Poll

If you were fairly new to a position, would you ask for time off after your supervisor requested that you work over the holidays?  

Yes, I would ask for the time off
No, I would not request time off if I was previously asked to work during that time

Author Topic: Asking for time off during the holidays  (Read 14753 times)

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MissRose

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Re: Asking for time off during the holidays
« Reply #45 on: December 11, 2012, 01:33:45 PM »
I would say if you are a new person and trying to prove yourself to get out of a state of being contract/temp to full hire, intern to full pay, and/or part time to full time, its a bad idea to ask for time off so soon into a new position especially if you do not get any time off for a certain period of time.

I know for many years I volunteered to work many holidays and times that were not favorable as those ahead of me in seniority had earned the right to the time off first.  Now that I have seniority, I still work some holidays but not all to prove I am a team player.

StuffedGrapeLeaves

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Re: Asking for time off during the holidays - Update on Page 3
« Reply #46 on: December 11, 2012, 01:53:07 PM »
CreteGirl, now I'm curious.  Are you the employee or the supervisor?

I am the supervisor of the soon to be ex-employee.  I tried to word my question neutrally to get unbiased answers, but I understand why most would assume I was the employee. 

My main question:  "would you even ask?", was answered with a resounding no.  I was curious if the fact that the position is part time and temporary would make anyone more likely to ask for or expect the time off.

The employee in question has been a stellar employee up until this point, although he is still learning the position basics. 

I asked him to reschedule his vacation, and he told me it was not possible.  I told him this jeopardizes his chances for advancement and even continued employment, to which he had no response.

What he has thrown away is an opportunity that could, after a number of years, turn from an entry level position into a six figure income.   He has lost the opportunity to be mentored by someone who has the position he said he someday hopes to achieve.

I'm astounded at how easily he has thrown away an opportunity for career mentoring and advancement within an industry leading company.

Thanks for answering the question!  I'm with you - it's astounding how willing he is to throw away this opportunity.  I hope that trip was worth it for him.

bah12

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Re: Asking for time off during the holidays
« Reply #47 on: December 11, 2012, 03:31:34 PM »
It amazes me how some people just don't look at the big picture.  This is a situation where someone is new to a company/position and hadn't previously requested time off.  Being asked to work, knowing that no one else is available to cover and then deciding to request that time off is not smart.  In this case I think it does hurt to ask.  It basically tells the supervisor that you have no consideration for the needs to the company and that you (general) are only thinking of your own needs.  Not something that company leadership looks too fondly on.  A new employee does not have the leverage or the rights that a seasoned employee that has proven worth does and they shouldn't act like it.  In this same situations (as the employee) I would suck it up and work. 

Biker Granny

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Re: Asking for time off during the holidays
« Reply #48 on: December 12, 2012, 03:17:43 PM »
It never ceases to amaze me the sense of entitlement some people get.
I work in an accounting office and the end of our Fiscal Year is Sept 30th.  It is common knowledge that you just don't ask for time off after Sept 10th and don't ask again until Oct 10th.  Inveritably three employees always have to have the last few days of Sept off.
In my 19 years here and a gagillion vacation hours saved up, I have missed gdaughter's birthday a couple of times (Sept 7) and have never gotten to go see the fall, (I'm in Florida) but I've never asked for time off during that period.

Winterlight

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Re: Asking for time off during the holidays - Update on Page 3
« Reply #49 on: December 12, 2012, 04:36:02 PM »
CreteGirl, now I'm curious.  Are you the employee or the supervisor?

I am the supervisor of the soon to be ex-employee.  I tried to word my question neutrally to get unbiased answers, but I understand why most would assume I was the employee. 

My main question:  "would you even ask?", was answered with a resounding no.  I was curious if the fact that the position is part time and temporary would make anyone more likely to ask for or expect the time off.

The employee in question has been a stellar employee up until this point, although he is still learning the position basics. 

I asked him to reschedule his vacation, and he told me it was not possible.  I told him this jeopardizes his chances for advancement and even continued employment, to which he had no response.

What he has thrown away is an opportunity that could, after a number of years, turn from an entry level position into a six figure income.   He has lost the opportunity to be mentored by someone who has the position he said he someday hopes to achieve.

I'm astounded at how easily he has thrown away an opportunity for career mentoring and advancement within an industry leading company.

Honestly, the fact that it's part time and temporary makes me even less likely to ask, given the hope that the job would become permanent. Spoiling your chances before they ever happen is a solid CLM. (Career limiting move)
If wisdom’s ways you wisely seek,
Five things observe with care,
To whom you speak,
Of whom you speak,
And how, and when, and where.
Caroline Lake Ingalls

JeanFromBNA

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Re: Asking for time off during the holidays
« Reply #50 on: December 12, 2012, 06:50:25 PM »
Makes me grateful for my employees.  One of my employees has a ruptured disk (non-work related), and must have surgery soon.  The others have paid time off scheduled around the holidays.  I have asked them if they could help, and they said they would come in if necessary. 

Lillie82

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Re: Asking for time off during the holidays - Update on Page 3
« Reply #51 on: December 12, 2012, 06:59:16 PM »
CreteGirl, now I'm curious.  Are you the employee or the supervisor?

I am the supervisor of the soon to be ex-employee.  I tried to word my question neutrally to get unbiased answers, but I understand why most would assume I was the employee. 

My main question:  "would you even ask?", was answered with a resounding no.  I was curious if the fact that the position is part time and temporary would make anyone more likely to ask for or expect the time off.

The employee in question has been a stellar employee up until this point, although he is still learning the position basics. 

I asked him to reschedule his vacation, and he told me it was not possible.  I told him this jeopardizes his chances for advancement and even continued employment, to which he had no response.

What he has thrown away is an opportunity that could, after a number of years, turn from an entry level position into a six figure income.   He has lost the opportunity to be mentored by someone who has the position he said he someday hopes to achieve.

I'm astounded at how easily he has thrown away an opportunity for career mentoring and advancement within an industry leading company.

Can I have his job?  >:D I promise I'll be more reliable than he showed himself to be.  ;D

Just kidding - but if you were wondering whether you were in your right to be annoyed at him even just asking, well, I would say yes you are.
You /could/ perhaps have told him: "No" instead of just /asking/ him to reschedule his vacation, but then again, you did explain the consequences.
It's odd. He must just not have cared as much about the job, the field and the opportunities as you would have expected him to.

I hope the next one who fills the position will be a better match!

Since you say he's been "stellar" up to this point...you're letting him go based on this incident of asking?

MayHug

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Re: Asking for time off during the holidays
« Reply #52 on: December 12, 2012, 07:04:06 PM »
This is a little different, but my job is open 24/7 365 days a year. We never close. Interviewees are told this before hiring. They even sign a paper stating they understand the policy about potentially working holidays. We still get newer employees that act shocked when they are told they may have to work Thanksgiving/Christmas. "But I didn't realize every holiday included Christmas!"

We are paid well for actually working a holiday so most senior employees don't mind working. But everyone has to be willing to work.

Shoo

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Re: Asking for time off during the holidays
« Reply #53 on: December 12, 2012, 07:05:26 PM »

Since you say he's been "stellar" up to this point...you're letting him go based on this incident of asking?

I think it's more than just asking.  He's taking, against the wishes of his employer.  He's been asked to not go, but he's still going.

KenveeB

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Re: Asking for time off during the holidays
« Reply #54 on: December 12, 2012, 07:53:45 PM »

Since you say he's been "stellar" up to this point...you're letting him go based on this incident of asking?

I think it's more than just asking.  He's taking, against the wishes of his employer.  He's been asked to not go, but he's still going.

I think no matter how stellar you are, leaving everyone else in the lurch over something you'd already agreed to do is definitely worth not hiring someone on for. He's shown he's not a team player and absolutely not reliable. I'm sure there are plenty of other people who would do a stellar job as well but actually be able to work the times they say they'll work.

blarg314

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Re: Asking for time off during the holidays - Update on Page 3
« Reply #55 on: December 12, 2012, 08:58:42 PM »
I asked him to reschedule his vacation, and he told me it was not possible.  I told him this jeopardizes his chances for advancement and even continued employment, to which he had no response.

This sounds like more than simply asking - it sounds more like a demand, given that he had already agreed to work over the holidays.  If you're asking in a situation like this, it would be best to be really clear that you're asking a big favour, and will fully accept being turned down.

The employee may be very good at their tasks so far, but this behaviour indicates that there's an attitude problem there - likely that they'll work hard only as long as it's convenient to them, and can't be depended on to follow through if it isn't. That can go a long way to offsetting the benefits of someone who is technically competent. (or, conversely, in todays job market you have to be spectacular at job only you can do to support such an attitude issue).

snowdragon

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Re: Asking for time off during the holidays
« Reply #56 on: December 13, 2012, 02:19:26 AM »
Aside from how management views here, if she asks, how will her co=workers view a new worker who has less seniority, who has been asked to cover these days. asking and possibly getting them off,, especially if one of them have to cover those days. This could make them resentful of her and even if she does come back from this in the view of management,..it could affect how they will feel about her and deal with her for a long time to come

KenveeB

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Re: Asking for time off during the holidays
« Reply #57 on: December 13, 2012, 08:08:17 AM »
Aside from how management views here, if she asks, how will her co=workers view a new worker who has less seniority, who has been asked to cover these days. asking and possibly getting them off,, especially if one of them have to cover those days. This could make them resentful of her and even if she does come back from this in the view of management,..it could affect how they will feel about her and deal with her for a long time to come

Yup. Somebody has to cover that time. If it's not the new person (who already agreed), then who is going to get their holiday plans ruined?

dawbs

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Re: Asking for time off during the holidays
« Reply #58 on: December 13, 2012, 11:59:10 AM »
Wait--did he AGREE to work these other days?

Because I can't find an answer to that and...that drastically affects my opinion.

(I work a 4-10's schedule.  I end up coming in on my day off fairly regularly at certain times of the year but I won't do it at the drop of the hat--we agreed on a schedule when I was hired and I'm willing to be flexible but I expect my employer to understand that I'm 'doing a favor'/'going above and beyond'/etc when I drive in on my day off)

bopper

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Re: Asking for time off during the holidays
« Reply #59 on: December 13, 2012, 12:48:05 PM »
The OP sees this persons career trajectory as she has the experience and maturity.  The worker may not have the same goals or vision.