Author Topic: Truly a problem?  (Read 7821 times)

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bloo

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Re: Truly a problem?
« Reply #30 on: December 09, 2012, 07:21:28 PM »
She mentioned the rumors of Best Buy going out of business; perhaps it was against policy at that point to accept a return of any sort.

It's my understanding with computers, accessories and electronics that the return policy is MUCH shorter than other products and is ALWAYS shorter than the warranty period.

You might have 30-90 days to return a set of glasses or a lamp. But you might only have 7-14 days for computers and associated equipment.

A warranty period may be 1 whole year but beyond that 7-14 day period, you would have to send your defective equipment to the manufacturer for repair or replacement. So I'm impressed that the store would refund while under warranty.

EG.: I just bought a cellphone at Walmart. They informed me they have a 14 day policy for returns on cellphones. Any problems or I just don't like it I can bring it back to Walmart. If I have any problems with it AFTER the 14 days, I've got to send it back to Samsung, the manufacturer.

So I assumed that Luci45 bought the printer, had it longer than the average return policy for that store for printers when it broke but before the manufacturer's warranty expired. So she brought it back to the big box store she bought it at (Best Buy?) and they gave her a refund. That's pretty cool.

Audrey Quest

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Re: Truly a problem?
« Reply #31 on: December 09, 2012, 07:27:53 PM »
Nothing wrong with what she did!  They wasted her time.  It took 15 minutes to serve her.  Who knows how long she had to wait in line--there is usually a line at customer service during holiday shopping.  Stores offer services like shopping online and picking up in the store for convenience.  When their own incompetence renders that service inconvenient it isn't over the line to ask for compensation.
 
Consequences are good.  They need to get their act together.  Picking up an item bought online would seem to be well within the purview of customer service, so why didn't they know how to do their jobs?  As a customer, I am not there for them to cut their teeth on their procedures.  My time is worth something and they should be very careful about wasting it.
 
This doesn't sound like a "mistake" but people not being properly trained.  I know that many new people are hired during the holiday season, but its not like the holiday season is a complete surprise--it comes around the same time every year--plenty of notice to train people properly before putting them out there in front of the public.

Jones

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Re: Truly a problem?
« Reply #32 on: December 09, 2012, 07:31:53 PM »
I am suddenly realizing that I could be missing out on a lot of money from a lot of places...

bloo

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Re: Truly a problem?
« Reply #33 on: December 09, 2012, 08:27:32 PM »
Nothing wrong with what she did!  They wasted her time.  It took 15 minutes to serve her.  Who knows how long she had to wait in line--there is usually a line at customer service during holiday shopping.  Stores offer services like shopping online and picking up in the store for convenience.  When their own incompetence renders that service inconvenient it isn't over the line to ask for compensation.
 
Consequences are good.  They need to get their act together.  Picking up an item bought online would seem to be well within the purview of customer service, so why didn't they know how to do their jobs?  As a customer, I am not there for them to cut their teeth on their procedures.  My time is worth something and they should be very careful about wasting it.
 
This doesn't sound like a "mistake" but people not being properly trained.  I know that many new people are hired during the holiday season, but its not like the holiday season is a complete surprise--it comes around the same time every year--plenty of notice to train people properly before putting them out there in front of the public.

As much as I hate the idea of being a SS or being perceived as 'entitled', I agree with the bolded when shopping. I'm like an eagle watching things get rung up and there was one grocery store I used to shop at in the state I used to live in that would regularly have products ringing up for more than what they were labeled on the shelf. Since I grocery shopped 2-3 days a week and this was a smaller town (but a big store) they knew my face and wouldn't question me when I'd catch a mis-ring. Heck they trained me to carefully pay attention to prices. One day I just happen to look up while shopping and saw a banner hanging from the ceiling.

It said, "If one of your items scans incorrectly, it's yours - free of charge." The sign specifically stated that grills were exempt.

I kid you not, no matter what cashier I pointed that sign to after a mis-ring, they'd turn around and stare at the sign and then back at me as if they'd never seen it before. Since I was in there 2-3 days a week catching mis-rings EVERY. SINGLE. TIME I shopped, I always got a few bucks off my bill.

But it worked because the mis-rings started really tapering off, especially since I told all my friends and it was the only grocery store in town.

I have a feeling I got the sign pulled down, though. They mis-rang a $33.00 container of protein powder so I got it free. The manager had to okay the comp and I watched him go right to the shelf and clear out all the other protein powders so that no one else could grab one before he re-labeled it with the correct price.

The sign was down a week later.

But I agree that consequences are good and they needed to get their act together. Just because they were the only grocery store in the area did not give them the right to be sloppy in their service (in this case I had to pay more than the usual attention of prices and at the register). Even at Wal-Mart, where I do my usual grocery shopping I have a habit of wanting to have the conveyor loaded so I can watch the prices on the digital display as the cashier scan the products. They're no where near as bad as that old grocery but it still happens.

Auntie Mame

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Re: Truly a problem?
« Reply #34 on: December 09, 2012, 08:36:36 PM »
I prefer to cut people slack rather than demand free things because I'm slightly inconvenienced.
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CluelessBride

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Re: Truly a problem?
« Reply #35 on: December 09, 2012, 08:51:23 PM »
I prefer to cut people slack rather than demand free things because I'm slightly inconvenienced.

Demanding and asking are not the same thing.

Deetee

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Re: Truly a problem?
« Reply #36 on: December 09, 2012, 08:56:44 PM »
I prefer to cut people slack rather than demand free things because I'm slightly inconvenienced.

People yes. Corporations no.

If a company is trying to compete with another company (which Walmart is trying to do with Amazon), they better do it in a fashion that works. The corporation isn't giving gift cards (or free groceries on a mis-ring) because they are nice and capitulating to whining. They are doing it because they want people to come back to the store.

It is better for companies for people to let their complaints be known and the company can decide how to deal with with. The customer then has the choice of accepting the offer from the company. It's better for the company to hand out a $5 gift card than lose a customer to Amazon. (I assume or they wouldn't have the offer)


Audrey Quest

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Re: Truly a problem?
« Reply #37 on: December 09, 2012, 09:29:25 PM »
I prefer to cut people slack rather than demand free things because I'm slightly inconvenienced.

But, that's your preference.  You value your time below their incompetence.  Not everyone does.
 
You may have an extra 15 minutes to wait for people to get their act together, but not everyone has that luxury.  And if they find that they don't and someone has wasted their time, then they should bring the matter to someone's attention and ask to be compensated.

It's not really a "free thing," its compensation for having their time wasted.

LifeOnPluto

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Re: Truly a problem?
« Reply #38 on: December 09, 2012, 09:44:36 PM »
I think it's rather cheeky to ask for a specific item of compensation. IMO, the proper thing to do (if you truly feel the service was unacceptable) is to politely inform the manager of the situation, and see if they offer you anything (ie an apology, gift card, freebie, etc).

But to ask for something specific right off the bat shows a certain level of entitlement, to me.

One of the more popular suggestions here in threads about writing complaint letters is to spell out what resolution or compensation you feel would make the situation right. I'll admit that it's not something I'm personally comfortable with. I'd rather inform and see if I'm offered resolution/compensation - and if not I'll take my business elsewhere. I wouldn't ask for specific compensation unless the resolution I was getting was grossly unfair (e.g. refusing to honor a warranty or not offering to replace an ordered item that arrived broken). But I don't think there's anything wrong with being upfront with what you need to make the situation right if you are comfortable with it.

I think this is a good idea when it's clear what the value is. For example, if you buy a product, and it breaks, you could either ask for a replacement product, or reimbursement of what you paid for it.

But it's much harder to place a value on time. In this case, what is 15 minutes worth? A $10 gift voucher? A $30 gift voucher? A $200 gift voucher? How does one decide, and where does one draw the line?

Deetee

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Re: Truly a problem?
« Reply #39 on: December 09, 2012, 09:52:44 PM »
I prefer to cut people slack rather than demand free things because I'm slightly inconvenienced.

But, that's your preference.  You value your time below their incompetence.  Not everyone does.
 
You may have an extra 15 minutes to wait for people to get their act together, but not everyone has that luxury.  And if they find that they don't and someone has wasted their time, then they should bring the matter to someone's attention and ask to be compensated.

It's not really a "free thing," its compensation for having their time wasted.

For a while I worked on contract as a consultant. I had an hourly billable rate. I could work whenever I wanted as long as I got my work done and my hours were pretty flexible so I could work more or less if I wanted more money or more time.

It was interesting how that taught me to value my time even for non work related errands. I would start to consider what it cost me to go grocery shopping versus delivery, housekeeping versus a cleaning person etc.... Because I could be working during that time, I did not want to spend my (suddenly valuable) time on anything that didn't either bring me money or I enjoyed.

So, yes, my time is valuable. So if someone wastes 15 minutes of my time in a commercial transaction, it is (and was moreso when I was a contracter) exactly like they had taken $XX away from me.

Auntie Mame

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Re: Truly a problem?
« Reply #40 on: December 09, 2012, 10:00:58 PM »
I prefer to cut people slack rather than demand free things because I'm slightly inconvenienced.

But, that's your preference.  You value your time below their incompetence.  Not everyone does.
 
You may have an extra 15 minutes to wait for people to get their act together, but not everyone has that luxury.  And if they find that they don't and someone has wasted their time, then they should bring the matter to someone's attention and ask to be compensated.

It's not really a "free thing," its compensation for having their time wasted.

I don't consider myself more important and special than other people.  I make mistakes just like everyone else.  I approach things with patience.  Seriously, it's 15 minutes, the world is not going to end because you have to wait 15 minutes.
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MaryMy

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Re: Truly a problem?
« Reply #41 on: December 09, 2012, 10:01:19 PM »
So the next question in the lady wanting a gift card is do all the customers behind her get one too? After all the associates were all trying to solve her issue making others wait. My thought is she waited her turn and people were called in to help and she had their full attention. I do not warrant a gift card for my wait. Personally, I would have never asked for a gift card because staff was trying hard to fix the problem.  Should the person behind me receive a gift card because they had to wait for an associate to go in the back to get my layaway? Who's time was more valuable? Everyone's time is valuable!

I go to salon to by hair products. Sometimes the stylist tells the person in the chair to wait while they ring me out other times I am told to wait while they finish the person in the chair. Because one of us has to wait shouldn't we get a gift card? Going into any business means you may have a wait of some sort.

As far as training, those who have worked customer service know you learn a lot in the first day of training. The most common transactions are drilled in and you have no issues handling them. You perform them day in and out. Odd issues are brought up in training but if you rarely have to deal with them you do need help.

Giggity

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Re: Truly a problem?
« Reply #42 on: December 10, 2012, 08:22:45 AM »
I think it's truly snowflakey to request a gift card because you had to wait in line while Christmas-shopping in December. You and the rest of the world, lady. You ain't special.
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Sharnita

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Re: Truly a problem?
« Reply #43 on: December 10, 2012, 08:31:45 AM »
I think there is a lot we don't know.  We don't know the exact nature of the transaction.  Did she already pay online with the promise that it would eb ready and waiting at X store?  If so then they violated their own policy and promise to her.  The workeres were aware of 15 minutes of her wait but how long did it take her to get the attention of the sales associates? She mentioned a 30 minute wait.

jaxsue

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Re: Truly a problem?
« Reply #44 on: December 10, 2012, 08:47:37 AM »
I think it's truly snowflakey to request a gift card because you had to wait in line while Christmas-shopping in December. You and the rest of the world, lady. You ain't special.

ITA.

General comment: I am a vendor and work in several WM's in NJ. WM hires my company to do inventory, so while I don't work for WM I do spend lots of time in them. Pity me.  :P

Honestly, I'd avoid doing the ordering-and-pickup or layaway thing there during the holidays simply because of the number of orders/customers they deal with. The lines are crazy! I don't blame the employees for the most part. They are vastly underpaid, their hours are limited (so corp doesn't have to pay bennies or overtime), and there is a freeze on hiring in several of my stores. So the workers are being asked to d a lot.

I do think the customer was SS to demand a gift card. When I sign in at a WM, I have to stand in the customer service line, along with everyone else, in order to let them know I'm there to work. It's a requirement. My time is money, too, and the clock doesn't start until I start zapping UPC codes. It's frustrating, but I deal.

If someone is that unhappy with the level of customer service, they can go elsewhere.