Author Topic: Anyone an expert on Prime Rib  (Read 1204 times)

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POF

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Anyone an expert on Prime Rib
« on: December 08, 2012, 09:19:01 PM »
I am a pretty good cook, but not with beef roasts.  I cam make a great beef stew or pot roast - but give me a regular oven roast - and I get dry leathery meat.

My DH always comments when people walk out of the butcher with the lovely standing rib roasts ( prime rib roasts ). Of course there are 7,000 methods of cooking said roast.

What has worked for you ? Thanks

buvezdevin

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Re: Anyone an expert on Prime Rib
« Reply #1 on: December 08, 2012, 10:51:20 PM »
I am no expert, but for some few years, I made standing rib roasts using a recipe that started at high heat for 20 minutes then reduced temp to finish.  And every one was good - not necessarily amazing, but very good.  Then, I used a recipe pretty much as per the below link (the link is better written) - and would only cook it ths way now - this is the way to "amazing prime rib" and it is the reverse of what I had been doing, but it is well worth a try.

http://www.chow.com/recipes/30234-slow-roasted-prime-rib-au-jus
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sparksals

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Re: Anyone an expert on Prime Rib
« Reply #2 on: December 08, 2012, 11:51:20 PM »
Interesting recipe above, Buvezdevin.    I do prime rib every Christmas.  I shopped around and found the best deal for standing rib roast at Costco of all places.  It still isn't cheap, but it is a dang fine cut of meat.

I slow cook it too, but not at that low of a temp.  Here is a recipe I use:

http://www.food.com/recipe/kittencals-perfect-prime-rib-roast-beef-82023

It is kind of a pain to do the garlic slit thing, so last year, I cheated and got one already seasoned and stuffed from Costco... for the same price as the non-seasoned roast.  It was TDF!

POF, the key is not to overcook a prime rib and to use a meat probe or thermometer.  If your oven has a built in probe linked to your oven temp and timer, that is the best, otherwise, invest in a good thermometer, preferably digital and leave it in while it cooks.  I cook my prime rib to 120 and let it stand for 30- 45 minutes. 



Chip2

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Re: Anyone an expert on Prime Rib
« Reply #3 on: December 18, 2012, 09:32:17 AM »
I'm not an expert but Alton is:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YOoEzZNT8o4

Here's how to work a prime rib from start to finish.

Bethalize

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Re: Anyone an expert on Prime Rib
« Reply #4 on: December 18, 2012, 09:48:27 AM »
I follow Queen Delia (Smith) . High heat for twenty minutes, then a super low heat. Oh, and get a meat thermometer.

http://www.deliaonline.com/how-to-cook/meat/how-to-roast-beef.html

Morrigan

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Re: Anyone an expert on Prime Rib
« Reply #5 on: December 18, 2012, 11:50:05 AM »
We get a pre-seasoned prime rib.  Cook it at 500 for awhile (half an hour or so), then turn the heat off and let it sit in the oven for another hour.

sparksals

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Re: Anyone an expert on Prime Rib
« Reply #6 on: December 18, 2012, 12:34:43 PM »
Yes, a thermometer is essential for doing prime rib.  I start it high to sear the outside and then cook on low temp.  I take mine out at 120 b/c 130 cooks it to more medium when it stands.

DavidH

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Re: Anyone an expert on Prime Rib
« Reply #7 on: December 18, 2012, 12:45:02 PM »
The key is a meat thermometer and paying attention to it.  It is better to check the temperature of the meat often rather than risk overcooking it.  I'm on the high heat to sear and then low and slow.  Once you take it out of the oven, it is important to let it rest, about 20 min if I recall right, otherwise the juices will flow out when you cut it.  While it is resting, the heat in the roast will continue to cook it, so it is best to take it out when it's not quite as done as you want it.  It won't cook as quickly out of the oven, so it you wanted it to rest for 20 minutes, you'd take it out needing say another 10-15 minutes of cooking time.  If all else fails, it is much easier to cook it a bit more than to uncook it, so it is better to err on the side of underdone. 

veryfluffy

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Re: Anyone an expert on Prime Rib
« Reply #8 on: December 18, 2012, 01:10:03 PM »

http://www.chow.com/recipes/30234-slow-roasted-prime-rib-au-jus

This would be worth trying if I could eat the whole thing myself! Unfortunately DH likes his more medium well (which is an improvement over the well-to-cremated he used to prefer!). Using the "high heat for 20 minutes, then turn down" method tends to get the outside slices cooked how he likes it, and the inside bits nice and rare for me.
   

sparksals

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Re: Anyone an expert on Prime Rib
« Reply #9 on: December 18, 2012, 06:09:58 PM »
The key is a meat thermometer and paying attention to it.  It is better to check the temperature of the meat often rather than risk overcooking it.  I'm on the high heat to sear and then low and slow.  Once you take it out of the oven, it is important to let it rest, about 20 min if I recall right, otherwise the juices will flow out when you cut it.  While it is resting, the heat in the roast will continue to cook it, so it is best to take it out when it's not quite as done as you want it.  It won't cook as quickly out of the oven, so it you wanted it to rest for 20 minutes, you'd take it out needing say another 10-15 minutes of cooking time.  If all else fails, it is much easier to cook it a bit more than to uncook it, so it is better to err on the side of underdone.

This is exactly how I do mine too.  Make sure not to let it sit too long!  One year, I had very rude guests arrive late who didn't like Prime Rib and brought a full blown turkey that they expected to brown in the oven after borrowing my roaster.  The turkey in the oven took time from reheating my sides.  My $65 prime rib that was to be served rare to Medium rare was well done b/c it sat for over an hour.