Author Topic: Backrest, not footrest  (Read 6801 times)

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Last_Dance

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Backrest, not footrest
« on: December 12, 2012, 11:54:24 AM »
My BF and I went to the cinema last Sunday to see New Animated Movie. There were a lot of people in the teather, mostly children.

During a 5-minutes break about halfway through the movie, when the lights were all turned on, I happened to glance down toward the first rows of seats: a little girl in the second row had taken off her shoes and was sitting were feet up over the first-row backrest.
I couldn't believe my eyes.
Worse still, there was a younger boy on her left sitting exactly in the same way, shoes off and feet up over the backrest.

They might have been sitting like that for the whole first half of the movie for all I know. The seats right in front of them were mercifully empty, but there were people sitting in the front row.
I believe the two adults I saw sitting on the girl's right and talking to them were their parents/caretakers for the day. It didn't look like they were telling them to put their shoes on and sit like polite vertebrates.

Frankly, I thought it was disgusting. If it should happen again and I was closer, what should I say?

I know I should address the adults, but beyond that, I have no idea. Ok, that's not true, I have a couple but they came from Evil!Lilya, there's no way they are E-Hell approved.
We're fools whether we dance or not, so we might as well dance.

bah12

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Re: Backrest, not footrest
« Reply #1 on: December 12, 2012, 12:00:21 PM »
If it doesn't affect you, you shouldn't say anything.  They may be "disgusting" but it's not your place to parent the children or point out rudeness to the adults. 

If they were sitting in such a way as they were disturbing you (like you were sitting in front of them or their feet were blocking your view), then you could politely ask them to remove their feet so that you could lean back/see, or whatever.  If they didn't cooperate, then alert cinema staff and have them take care of it.

WillyNilly

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Re: Backrest, not footrest
« Reply #2 on: December 12, 2012, 12:25:18 PM »
For the last 30 years I've seen people putting their feet up on the backs of the seats in front of them at the movie theater.  I have never seen a theater employee or a PSA on screen asking people not too.  I actually think it was quite considerate they took their shoes off and limited themselves to seats without people in them.

onyonryngs

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Re: Backrest, not footrest
« Reply #3 on: December 12, 2012, 12:27:33 PM »
You say nothing.

TurtleDove

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Re: Backrest, not footrest
« Reply #4 on: December 12, 2012, 12:29:14 PM »
POD to PPs. I am not certain why you feel the need to say anything, and I wouldn't.

jmarvellous

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Re: Backrest, not footrest
« Reply #5 on: December 12, 2012, 12:32:30 PM »
For the last 30 years I've seen people putting their feet up on the backs of the seats in front of them at the movie theater.  I have never seen a theater employee or a PSA on screen asking people not too.  I actually think it was quite considerate they took their shoes off and limited themselves to seats without people in them.


Yep. It is exceedingly common to put feet up on unoccupied seat tops in stadium or inclined seating, in my experience.

SingActDance

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Re: Backrest, not footrest
« Reply #6 on: December 12, 2012, 12:54:52 PM »
I do it all the time (shoes on usually). The seat backs are not going to be harmed and if it's not bothering anybody....

Of course it applies only to casual environments, like sports arenas and movie theaters. At the ballet or the opera, it would be inappropriate.
Most people look at musical theatre and think "Why are those people singing and dancing in the street?" I'm sort of the opposite. I see a street full of people and think, "Why aren't they?"

rose red

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Re: Backrest, not footrest
« Reply #7 on: December 12, 2012, 01:33:29 PM »
Back when I was young and went to actual movie theaters, it was common to put your feet up.  Not if someone is sitting in the seat though.  From this topic, I thought this was no longer the case, but I guess it is still common from the other posts.

I don't know if you can say anything unless their feet were on your seat or the smell is directly bothering you.

Moray

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Re: Backrest, not footrest
« Reply #8 on: December 12, 2012, 01:36:38 PM »
You say nothing unless someone is actively putting their feet on the back of your seat.

Utah

DottyG

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Re: Backrest, not footrest
« Reply #9 on: December 12, 2012, 01:55:20 PM »
I agree with all of the above - from the "it's not your business to say anything" to "it's not that unusual/uncommon for someone to put their feet up like that."


BeagleMommy

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Re: Backrest, not footrest
« Reply #10 on: December 12, 2012, 01:58:24 PM »
You don't say anything unless their feet are near you or their feet smell up your airspace.  Otherwise, it is the theater owner/operator's job to enforce any rules.

I've seen other people do this.  Usually it doesn't matter as long as the seat in front of them in unoccupied.

Last_Dance

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Re: Backrest, not footrest
« Reply #11 on: December 12, 2012, 02:56:05 PM »
I didn't mean to come across as the seat police, I just wanted something to say if the people sitting next to me/behind me to the side decided to do so. I wasn't clear though, my bad.

Just to clarify, they weren't leaning their feet against the back of the chair, they were over the backrest. If somebody had been sitting in that chair, their feet would have been against the other person's head - I don't see that going down well.

To be honest, I wouldn't want to spend a movie with a pair of feet right next to my face, whether or not they have shoes on or smell. 
We're fools whether we dance or not, so we might as well dance.

onyonryngs

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Re: Backrest, not footrest
« Reply #12 on: December 12, 2012, 02:59:32 PM »
I didn't mean to come across as the seat police, I just wanted something to say if the people sitting next to me/behind me to the side decided to do so. I wasn't clear though, my bad.

Just to clarify, they weren't leaning their feet against the back of the chair, they were over the backrest. If somebody had been sitting in that chair, their feet would have been against the other person's head - I don't see that going down well.

To be honest, I wouldn't want to spend a movie with a pair of feet right next to my face, whether or not they have shoes on or smell.

I've never seen someone put their feet on a seat that is already occupied.  It's usually only done when there's an empty seat so hopefully you won't have an issue.

Yvaine

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Re: Backrest, not footrest
« Reply #13 on: December 12, 2012, 03:00:42 PM »
Just to clarify, they weren't leaning their feet against the back of the chair, they were over the backrest. If somebody had been sitting in that chair, their feet would have been against the other person's head - I don't see that going down well.

They may have intentionally chosen seats with no one in front of them, though, and there's no indication they'd have refused to move their feet if someone had come along later and sat there. I think the only time you can really say something is if they actually keep doing it once someone is sitting there--and even then, it's for the person being encroached on to say something, not a random third party.

Moray

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Re: Backrest, not footrest
« Reply #14 on: December 12, 2012, 03:01:20 PM »
They're using the seat in front of them because it's empty. I don't believe I've ever seen someone hang their feet on the back of an occupied seat.

However, should someone stick their feet on either side of your head, you can say "Please remove your feet from either side of my head". If someone sticks their feet on the back of your seat, you can say "Please don't rest your feet on the back of my seat."

If they don't stop, move or get an usher.

Utah