Author Topic: Backrest, not footrest  (Read 7133 times)

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TurtleDove

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Re: Backrest, not footrest
« Reply #15 on: December 12, 2012, 03:03:34 PM »
They're using the seat in front of them because it's empty. I don't believe I've ever seen someone hang their feet on the back of an occupied seat.

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Perfect Circle

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Re: Backrest, not footrest
« Reply #16 on: December 12, 2012, 03:25:38 PM »
I agree. You say absolutely nothing. This is not harming anyone, it's not your business to monitor what others do in a movie theatre and as far as my experience goes, it's a perfectly normal way of behaving in a theatre if you have an empty seat in front of you.
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Outdoor Girl

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Re: Backrest, not footrest
« Reply #17 on: December 12, 2012, 03:38:59 PM »
I would only say something if it was directly affecting me.  So if the feet were blocking my view of the screen or if they were over my seat or the seat to either side of me or they are so 'fragrant' that it's making me naseous?  I'd ask them to move their feet.
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Re: Backrest, not footrest
« Reply #18 on: December 12, 2012, 08:02:46 PM »
I've been known to put my feet up and over an empty seat.  If anyone even looked like they were contemplating the row in front if me, I moved my feet back down.  I think the kids were considerate for removing their shoes.

Honestly, I'm more squicked out about possible lice on the headrest than whether anyone's shoes have been in the top edge.  It's a weird fear, not probable but possible.  (This after having a horrific episode when oldest was in kindergarten - *shudder*)

FadingAmaranth

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Re: Backrest, not footrest
« Reply #19 on: December 12, 2012, 08:58:58 PM »
Long time lurker, first time poster.  :P

I'm just popping out hiding to say that I've never particularly seen anything wrong with this either and have done it on occasion myself (though I always make sure my feet don't touch any of the fabric of the seat). Ushers have never spoken a word about it to any one and as long as you're not blocking a seat that's needed (i.e. wait until the movie's started to get settled), I don't see it as particularly rude; it's not...delicate but not rude.

Saying that though, I would be highly uncomfortable if someone's feet were dangling right next to my face while I were watching a movie and definitely think that you're well within your rights to say something about that. Or if they're blocking a seat you want to sit in. A simple, "I'm sorry but I'm not comfortable with your feet there, could you please move them" or "I'd like to sit there, would you please move your feet" wouldn't be out of line. Saying it to someone you're not even near would come across as a bit condscending.

Alternatively, if it really gets under your skin, just duck out and go ask the usher about it. They'll either act or not depending on what they deem is acceptable.

Honestly, I'm more squicked out about possible lice on the headrest than whether anyone's shoes have been in the top edge.  It's a weird fear, not probable but possible.  (This after having a horrific episode when oldest was in kindergarten - *shudder*)

^ Also this. If I have a jacket with me I sit with my hood up. It makes me a little more comfortable.

Daquiri40

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Re: Backrest, not footrest
« Reply #20 on: December 13, 2012, 11:02:23 AM »
At the theaters I have been to recently, the announcements say, turn off your cellphones, no texting, no loud talking, etc AND keep your feet off the seats

I was taught to keep your feet off the furniture.  I also think - you are at a theater, not your home.  I work at a college and students lie on benches, put their feet everywhere, etc.  Is it a generational thing?

Why is it necessary to put your feet up?

Yvaine

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Re: Backrest, not footrest
« Reply #21 on: December 13, 2012, 11:11:44 AM »
At the theaters I have been to recently, the announcements say, turn off your cellphones, no texting, no loud talking, etc AND keep your feet off the seats

I was taught to keep your feet off the furniture.  I also think - you are at a theater, not your home.  I work at a college and students lie on benches, put their feet everywhere, etc.  Is it a generational thing?

Why is it necessary to put your feet up?

I don't think it's generational--I know people of all ages who do it.

I think it may just be a result of movie theaters being uncomfortable. (Is it just me or is there less legroom than there used to be?) But whether it's rude or not, whether it's against the rules or not, the gist of the thread is that it's not some random other customer's place to police it unless the feet are in his/her space. If it's a rule, let the theater staff police it. If it's not a rule, just leave it alone. It falls under the etiquette rule of not calling out other people's rudeness. Especially total strangers.


DottyG

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Re: Backrest, not footrest
« Reply #22 on: December 13, 2012, 12:35:33 PM »
Quote
At the theaters I have been to recently, the announcements say, turn off your cellphones, no texting, no loud talking, etc AND keep your feet off the seats

That's really interesting.  Mine aren't saying that.  Where are you (you don't have to give specifics - even just US vs UK or whatever)?


WillyNilly

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Re: Backrest, not footrest
« Reply #23 on: December 13, 2012, 03:08:20 PM »
...I think it may just be a result of movie theaters being uncomfortable. (Is it just me or is there less legroom than there used to be?) ...

Funny.  I actually see less of the feet up thing these days because, in my city at least, theaters have become decidedly more comfortable and roomy.  The seats generally recline a bit (like on a spring, so you lean back it leans too) and have beverage holders built into the arm rests.  And stadium seating is more the norm now, so tall people are no longer an issue. Plus the rows are now super wide - wide enough the seated folks don't even need to scootch to the side let alone stand up to let people in.  And as a result of the wide rows, its harder to reach one's legs to the seats in front of them.

Yvaine

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Re: Backrest, not footrest
« Reply #24 on: December 13, 2012, 03:18:53 PM »
...I think it may just be a result of movie theaters being uncomfortable. (Is it just me or is there less legroom than there used to be?) ...

Funny.  I actually see less of the feet up thing these days because, in my city at least, theaters have become decidedly more comfortable and roomy.  The seats generally recline a bit (like on a spring, so you lean back it leans too) and have beverage holders built into the arm rests.  And stadium seating is more the norm now, so tall people are no longer an issue. Plus the rows are now super wide - wide enough the seated folks don't even need to scootch to the side let alone stand up to let people in.  And as a result of the wide rows, its harder to reach one's legs to the seats in front of them.

Around here, a theater complex is likely to have one or two rooms that are like that and the rest much less plush. So if you're not seeing whatever the biggest movie of the week is, you don't get stadium seating and such. The exception is the small sort of "boutique" movie theaters that have only one or maybe two screens; a lot of those will be really nice with couches, beer sold, food that's better than movie food, etc.

SciFiLeslie

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Re: Backrest, not footrest
« Reply #25 on: December 13, 2012, 04:27:02 PM »
For the last 30 years I've seen people putting their feet up on the backs of the seats in front of them at the movie theater.  I have never seen a theater employee or a PSA on screen asking people not too.  I actually think it was quite considerate they took their shoes off and limited themselves to seats without people in them.

I worked in a movie theater in the early 90s and on walk-throughs we did ask folks to remove their feet from the back of seats.  Once I realized that the gentleman I had just spoken to was the local NBC news film reviewer.

Momiitz

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Re: Backrest, not footrest
« Reply #26 on: December 13, 2012, 06:10:53 PM »
I'm so surprised so many people here think that feet on the seat are okay.

It looks like I might be in the minority here. I think it is rude to put your feet up on the back or top of a theater seat. Its also not being respectful of someone elses property.

This is a place of business and just because the management does not say anything does not mean its okay. Maybe they were taught not to point out another persons rudeness. I know that phrase is stated on this forum a lot.

I would think that the staff are probably not allowed to say anything unless it is affecting another patron. I'm sure after so many people ingored their pleas for no feet on the seats they just gave up trying.

The theater is not your home.  Treat it like you would any other business. Would you go to the dentist office and put your feet up on the seat?

To answer the question I would not say anything. That would be pointing out someone else's rudeness. I would be silently shaking my head wondering why they did not know any better.

Edited to add info.
« Last Edit: December 13, 2012, 06:13:53 PM by Momiitz »

Tabby Uprising

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Re: Backrest, not footrest
« Reply #27 on: December 13, 2012, 06:17:59 PM »
I'm so surprised so many people here think that feet on the seat are okay.

It looks like I might be in the minority here. I think it is rude to put your feet up on the back or top of a theater seat. Its also not being respectful of someone elses property.

This is a place of business and just because the management does not say anything does not mean its okay. Maybe they were taught not to point out another persons rudeness. I know that phrase is stated on this forum a lot.

I would think that the staff are probably not allowed to say anything unless it is affecting another patron. I'm sure after so many people ingored their pleas for no feet on the seats they just gave up trying.

The theater is not your home.  Treat it like you would any other business. Would you go to the dentist office and put your feet up on the seat?

To answer the question I would not say anything. That would be pointing out someone else's rudeness. I would be silently shaking my head wondering why they did not know any better.

Edited to add info.

I don't think that argument holds much water when theaters aren't shy about asking patrons not to bring in outside food, talk during the film, text, etc.  When discussing a business, it isn't pointing out someone else's rudeness, it is enforcing their rules and policies. 

DottyG

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Re: Backrest, not footrest
« Reply #28 on: December 13, 2012, 06:23:00 PM »
Quote
I don't think that argument holds much water when theaters aren't shy about asking patrons not to bring in outside food, talk during the film, text, etc.  When discussing a business, it isn't pointing out someone else's rudeness, it is enforcing their rules and policies.

That.

And, actually, I do put my feet on the seat at the dentist's office! :D  How do you not do that?  It's how the seat is made.

(I know what you were trying to say.  :)  I think you just picked a bad example there.)




Yvaine

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Re: Backrest, not footrest
« Reply #29 on: December 13, 2012, 06:27:52 PM »
I'm so surprised so many people here think that feet on the seat are okay.

It looks like I might be in the minority here. I think it is rude to put your feet up on the back or top of a theater seat. Its also not being respectful of someone elses property.

This is a place of business and just because the management does not say anything does not mean its okay. Maybe they were taught not to point out another persons rudeness. I know that phrase is stated on this forum a lot.

I would think that the staff are probably not allowed to say anything unless it is affecting another patron. I'm sure after so many people ingored their pleas for no feet on the seats they just gave up trying.

The theater is not your home.  Treat it like you would any other business. Would you go to the dentist office and put your feet up on the seat?

To answer the question I would not say anything. That would be pointing out someone else's rudeness. I would be silently shaking my head wondering why they did not know any better.

Edited to add info.

I don't think that argument holds much water when theaters aren't shy about asking patrons not to bring in outside food, talk during the film, text, etc.  When discussing a business, it isn't pointing out someone else's rudeness, it is enforcing their rules and policies.

Exactly. Whereas, if a random private citizen chastised someone for putting their feet on the seat, that's pointing out someone else's rudeness as we've talked about on this forum.

This thread really isn't about whether or not it's OK to put one's feet on the seats, and it's possible to not like that practice while still thinking it's rude to chastise a total stranger about it when you don't even work there.

If one was really concerned, I suppose it would be acceptable to report the foot-rester to theater management, though I doubt they'd care that much. But in any case, it's for the theater to decide whether or not this is a rule, and to enforce it if it is a rule. It is not one patron's place to give an etiquette lesson to another patron whose (possibly) rude behavior isn't even affecting them. It's different if someone's behavior is actually impinging on you--like talking so you can't hear the movie, or kicking the seat you're actually in--but someone just doing something you find unaesthetic is not carte blanche to lecture a stranger.