Author Topic: Dentist etiquette - should I jump ship?  (Read 6419 times)

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katycoo

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Re: Dentist etiquette - should I jump ship?
« Reply #30 on: December 17, 2012, 05:31:28 PM »
Actually, I know dentists who will open early, stay late or even come in on days they are normally closed to help take care of emergencies.

There are many who do and this is a wonderful service.  And I certainly do not blame patients who seek out providers of this service.

But I don't think a dentist is necesarily deficient because he prefers to be able to schedule his personal time how he chooses instead of always prioritising his patients.

Extreme example, but the dentist who has a family he wishes to spend time with needent necessarily miss out of that as he is constantly working back to assist people with emergencies.

I do agree that it is awkward to utilise a dentist only in an emergency situation, but I have a certain amount of respect for those who choose not to provide emergency after hours appointments.

Judah

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Re: Dentist etiquette - should I jump ship?
« Reply #31 on: December 17, 2012, 05:39:27 PM »
Actually, I know dentists who will open early, stay late or even come in on days they are normally closed to help take care of emergencies.

There are many who do and this is a wonderful service.  And I certainly do not blame patients who seek out providers of this service.

But I don't think a dentist is necesarily deficient because he prefers to be able to schedule his personal time how he chooses instead of always prioritising his patients.

Extreme example, but the dentist who has a family he wishes to spend time with needent necessarily miss out of that as he is constantly working back to assist people with emergencies.

I do agree that it is awkward to utilise a dentist only in an emergency situation, but I have a certain amount of respect for those who choose not to provide emergency after hours appointments.

This is a business relationship. A dentist is well within her rights to decide that making accommodations for emergencies is not something she wants for her business, but her patients are also free to decide that doesn't work for them and  to find a dentist that will see them when they need to be seen.

We all have to make priorities in our lives. I would not choose a dentist who wouldn't see me when I have an emergency. There are lots of good dentists out there and it makes more sense for me to find one who will work with my needs than for me to have to suffer in pain or try to hunt around for someone willing to fit me in when I have an emergency.
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katycoo

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Re: Dentist etiquette - should I jump ship?
« Reply #32 on: December 17, 2012, 06:04:18 PM »
Actually, I know dentists who will open early, stay late or even come in on days they are normally closed to help take care of emergencies.

There are many who do and this is a wonderful service.  And I certainly do not blame patients who seek out providers of this service.

But I don't think a dentist is necesarily deficient because he prefers to be able to schedule his personal time how he chooses instead of always prioritising his patients.

Extreme example, but the dentist who has a family he wishes to spend time with needent necessarily miss out of that as he is constantly working back to assist people with emergencies.

I do agree that it is awkward to utilise a dentist only in an emergency situation, but I have a certain amount of respect for those who choose not to provide emergency after hours appointments.

This is a business relationship. A dentist is well within her rights to decide that making accommodations for emergencies is not something she wants for her business, but her patients are also free to decide that doesn't work for them and  to find a dentist that will see them when they need to be seen.

We all have to make priorities in our lives. I would not choose a dentist who wouldn't see me when I have an emergency. There are lots of good dentists out there and it makes more sense for me to find one who will work with my needs than for me to have to suffer in pain or try to hunt around for someone willing to fit me in when I have an emergency.

I agree entirely.  Which is why the OP should not feel bad about the decisions she made in seeing another dentist, and should continue with whomever she feels most comfortable.  She has no obligation to either. 

Winterlight

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Re: Dentist etiquette - should I jump ship?
« Reply #33 on: December 18, 2012, 09:26:34 AM »
I don't think I'd stay with a dentist who couldn't see me in an emergency.  One thing you might do before switching dentists, however, is speak to your old dentist in person if you can.  It could be that his appointment scheduler has no idea what constitutes an emergency, and the dentist had no idea he/she had put you off like that.  Give him a chance to tell you he's appalled at what happened.  If he doesn't, then go forth to your new dentist!

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Virg

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Re: Dentist etiquette - should I jump ship?
« Reply #34 on: December 18, 2012, 10:27:55 AM »
I also agree with Shoo.  Talk directly to your dentist about what happened and you'll know if it was a situation that won't happen again, and you might wish to give  a decades-long business relationship another chance if that's the case.  But if your original dentist can't assure you that it was a one-time error, then in your shoes I'd switch.  If a dentist can't fit you in for emergency work, then it's a good idea to find a dentist who will because dental emergencies can be extremely painful and cause lasting problems.

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Decimus

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Re: Dentist etiquette - should I jump ship?
« Reply #35 on: December 18, 2012, 11:22:19 AM »
I'll POD talking to the dentist too.  If a dentist doesn't want to treat emergencies, that's his/her choice, but I do feel they ought to then have someone they refer to ("For emergencies or after-hours, call Dr X at 555-5555").  I feel it would be particularly odd if the dentist couldn't at least refer to an emergency dental clinic or something.

RegionMom

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Re: Dentist etiquette - should I jump ship?
« Reply #36 on: December 18, 2012, 11:41:34 AM »
The OP called in pain.  She was told to wait three weeks

Several years ago, my 4 yr old DD had a mouth pain and our insurance told us only three people could take care of it.  All were out when I called.  Insurance expanded the net and found one person 60 miles away. 
They wanted me to bounce her around in pain and wait a few more days, regardless.  Or, I could easily wait a couple of weeks, right?  Till one of the three locals was back?

no way.
I finagled a cell phone number and called to find that the person 60 miles away would be in my town the next day at a satellite office.  I got DD in  first thing. 
All better.

And, yes, I would have paid out of pocket cash to help DD.  But, we pay for insurance by golly, and we got it covered!  (This was for an oral surgeon, not our regular dentist)

There is a difference between, "I am in PAIN and need help NOW" and "I would like to schedule an appointment."

Talk to the dentist and see if he knows the details.  Then decide.



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girlmusic

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Re: Dentist etiquette - should I jump ship?
« Reply #37 on: December 18, 2012, 12:47:08 PM »
Actually, I know dentists who will open early, stay late or even come in on days they are normally closed to help take care of emergencies.

My father is a dentist, and he has always done this. He will also call the next day and see how the patient is doing, if it was a major procedure (he himself, not his staff). Sometimes a scheduled appointment would have to wait for an emergency patient, but they were always informed of what was going on and offered an alternative time if they couldn't wait.

Annoyed in America

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Re: Dentist etiquette - should I jump ship?
« Reply #38 on: January 05, 2013, 07:43:44 AM »
I don't think I'd stay with a dentist who couldn't see me in an emergency.  One thing you might do before switching dentists, however, is speak to your old dentist in person if you can.  It could be that his appointment scheduler has no idea what constitutes an emergency, and the dentist had no idea he/she had put you off like that.  Give him a chance to tell you he's appalled at what happened.  If he doesn't, then go forth to your new dentist!

I agree.  I had a doctor whose assistant acted like she was the supreme gate keeper and wouldn't let you get in or even talk to the doctor if you didn't kiss her patutie.  I let the doctor know and things got better (for a while).