Author Topic: The missing invitation  (Read 3772 times)

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Roodabega

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Re: The missing invitation
« Reply #15 on: December 19, 2012, 12:15:43 PM »
My first thought was similar to citadelle.  That possibly there was no intention of sending the invitation, but when asked about it, felt they had to send one.

Mikayla

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Re: The missing invitation
« Reply #16 on: December 19, 2012, 02:31:06 PM »
SmarterPrimate, I don't agree with people saying you're overthinking this.  You mentioned in the OP that your DF is a higher-up in IT, who would know if the email had been sent.  A work address is less likely to have those "abysses" than a free web based service.

So I, too, would be a little concerned about the way it came down.  Did the invite contain anything by way of explanation/apology, or was it just worded like any other invite?

If the latter, I have to say it sounds like a purposeful omission where they changed their minds.  Anytime I make a mistake like this, I'd at least put something in the email to acknowledge my oversight, or wrong addy, or whatever might have happened.

TootsNYC

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Re: The missing invitation
« Reply #17 on: December 19, 2012, 02:34:54 PM »
But they gave their explanation/apology IN PERSON the night before, no? So why would they think they needed to repeat themselves?

And maybe the format didn't make it easy to add such a note.

The potential for mere administrative problems is so huge, from something going wrong electronically to them thinking your DH's email address was in the mail-merge group when it wasn't. What is that saying? Never attribute to malice that which can be explained by carelessness, stupidity, or mistake?

Tea Drinker

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Re: The missing invitation
« Reply #18 on: December 19, 2012, 06:10:58 PM »
Another possible source of error: A friend of mine with a fairly ordinary name signed up with gmail early enough to get initial+last name as her address. So, if she was "Jane White," it would be jwhite@gmail.com. She gets a lot of email for other people with her initial and last name, including a fair number of other women with the same full name (so she can't just set up a filter to block anything for "John White" and "Jennifer White" and so on). Much of the time, this is because people don't remember their own addresses, or assume that they can just say they have the username jwhite@gmail.com and it will be theirs, rather than setting up jwhite47 or the like. But not all those misdelivered bank statements and airline ticket confirmations and party invitations are the fault of the would-be recipient: sometimes a third party assumes that of course their friend, relative, or colleague has that email address.
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Minmom3

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Re: The missing invitation
« Reply #19 on: December 19, 2012, 11:01:25 PM »
Tea Drinker, does Jane respond to the erroneous emails telling them that "she is the the Jane White they are looking for?"  What a complete nuisance!  But that would be a funny response!
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zyrs

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Re: The missing invitation
« Reply #20 on: December 20, 2012, 03:41:29 PM »
I think in the case of an evite, they should send the evite to both members of the couple.  That way, if it gets filtered out or stuck in the abyss for one person, it hopefully won't have the same thing happen to the other.

Once, a friend sent me an email with a question about something upcoming.  Then a week later, they sent me an email complaining that I had not answered the question.  I had not received the email.  They did not believe me, but we got their question answered and everything was fine.

A few months later, I was checking my email and lo and behold here was the email they had sent me.  Somehow, between the day they sent it and the day I received it, it had just been sitting in the internet equivalent of the dead letter office.  o, maybe in a few months, you will get the first invitation.

Tea Drinker

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Re: The missing invitation
« Reply #21 on: December 20, 2012, 08:44:40 PM »
Tea Drinker, does Jane respond to the erroneous emails telling them that "she is the the Jane White they are looking for?"  What a complete nuisance!  But that would be a funny response!

She responds to some: "Please stop sending me a stranger's confidential banking information" and "You are violating HIPAA by sending me someone else's medical test results" and occasionally "please correct this travel information so your client can get her flight." And the polite "Are you the Jane I went to high school with?" ones, as distinct from "Dear Jane, Remember Mr. So-and-so's social studies class?! Wasn't that cool?"
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Hmmmmm

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Re: The missing invitation
« Reply #22 on: December 20, 2012, 11:17:47 PM »
SmarterPrimate, I don't agree with people saying you're overthinking this.  You mentioned in the OP that your DF is a higher-up in IT, who would know if the email had been sent.  A work address is less likely to have those "abysses" than a free web based service.

So I, too, would be a little concerned about the way it came down.  Did the invite contain anything by way of explanation/apology, or was it just worded like any other invite?

If the latter, I have to say it sounds like a purposeful omission where they changed their minds.  Anytime I make a mistake like this, I'd at least put something in the email to acknowledge my oversight, or wrong addy, or whatever might have happened.

I disagree about a work address being less likely to have an abyss.  Some, like my company, have extreme restrictions on incoming email and many emails with attachments get rejected.  Yes the sender should get a rejection notice, but if they sent mass emails, they might have missed the rejection notice. 

I think it more likely they just forgot to include ya'lls address when sending.