Author Topic: Hypothetical Airplane Question  (Read 4850 times)

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Devix

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Re: Hypothetical Airplane Question
« Reply #30 on: January 03, 2013, 11:20:06 PM »
I...actually have had this happen to me.

My seatmate got in a huff when I ordered my drink because (in her words) "Young ladies shouldn't partake in such sinful activities."  My response was to order two more rum & cokes all while flashing her a happy grin.  Not sure if it's the proper response though it did get her started on a mini-tirade on how I obviously hadn't been raised in a good christian household.  Too bad for her my mom was sitting in the seat in front of us and mom's response was definitely not e-hell approved.   >:D

Firecat

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Re: Hypothetical Airplane Question
« Reply #31 on: January 03, 2013, 11:21:26 PM »
Their moral standards aren't my issue. If I could summon sufficient presence of mind, I might say something like "If it will bother you, perhaps the flight attendant could assist you in finding another seat." If said politely, I think it puts the issue right back on them, which is where it belongs, after all. Sometimes we all have to deal with things that don't match our personal moral codes or preferences when in public places.

If someone said that they were a recovering alcoholic, I think I'd probably say something like, "I'm sorry to hear that. Congratulations on your sobriety; I hope it goes well for you." But I'd still have the drink if I wanted it enough to actually pay airline prices for one in the first place.

kherbert05

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Re: Hypothetical Airplane Question
« Reply #32 on: January 03, 2013, 11:29:13 PM »

I don't drink because I don't handle any sedatives very well. 1/2 a glass of wine and I can't walk straight.

The members of my family who are in recovery would say that if the person in recovery can't handle the situation - it is their job not to be in that situation.


Moral objections go nowhere with me. I hate people saying You doing something I object to means you are violating my religious rights.


If the person confided that they were severely allergic or the smell made them ill I would have to respect that.  I have to tell my seat mates about my peanut allergy because of the close quarters/touch can kill me thing. I simply ask they be careful not to touch me and dispose of the packaging so that it doesn't get into my space.  (I've never had a seatmate get offended - I did have an attendant tell me "People Like you shouldn't fly" When I went to the desk to complain after the flight I found out most of the people (12 or so on a commuter flight) had already field complaints about her yelling at me.
 
I actually had someone say something similar  I have a history of airplane sinus headaches. So I have medication I start taking 24 hours before the flight. Once a day that means I have to take 3 meds at the same time (1 is 24 hours, one is every 8 hours, one is every 4 hours). The person next to me objected, because they thought the meds were going to knock me out. I assured her that the meds wouldn't knock me out (they do let me sleep if my sinuses are acting up but they don't sedate me).  The woman complained to the attendants  - I showed them the meds to prove they weren't illegal drugs (all OTC now then one of them would have been an Rx) She griped about people flying drugged up for a while - then went to sleep and snored loudly. :o
Don't Teach Them For Your Past. Teach Them For Their Future

sparksals

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Re: Hypothetical Airplane Question
« Reply #33 on: January 03, 2013, 11:31:38 PM »
I would not comply for any reason, especially if it is for their moral reasons.  By complying, I would be compromising mine.  No one has the right to make this request of their seatmate on a flight.


OK, but what would you say/do in response?  Would you blatantly ignore, pretend like you didn't hear, or actually say something?


I would politely decline without offering any type of explanation - "I'm afraid that won't be possible".

sevenday

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Re: Hypothetical Airplane Question
« Reply #34 on: January 03, 2013, 11:45:06 PM »
This happened on the last flight my roommate was on, shortly after Christmas.  Not to him but to another passenger.  Person in 1st class orders something, person in the exit row seat directly behind first class began muttering things.  Didn't say anything directly to Passenger A, but was saying things like drinking was immoral, getting drunk in public was rude, et cetera.  Passenger A didn't say anything to passenger B, but did flag down a passing attendant and quietly explained what was happening.  The attendant went back to speak to Passenger B.  There was a brief flurry of raised voices which died down as soon as the FA said, "Sir, if you do not calm down and stop bothering the other passengers, we will have you detained when we reach our destination for disrupting the flight.  Nobody will enjoy that, including you.  I realize you are allowed to have your opinions, but keep them to yourself and there won't be any more problems."  Roommate reported perfect silence from Passenger B the rest of the flight.

As to what you can do: you could say, "Is there some medical reason why I shouldn't eat/drink this?"  In case there's some allergy or 'airsickness' situation in the offing.  If the answer is negative to these, you can say, "I see," and then turn back to whatever you were doing and ignore them.  If the person keeps it up, notify the attendants, this falls into the region of 'their job.'  Either ask to have the other person moved, or to switch seats yourself if things are that bad.  Of course I'm slightly spoiled by the fact that I'm deaf and if I don't want to hear someone's BS, I don't have to :D

snowdragon

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Re: Hypothetical Airplane Question
« Reply #35 on: January 03, 2013, 11:46:48 PM »
The request is on moral grounds.

Their morals are not my issue,,, and I would no more comply with this than I would being told what to wear or eat on moral grounds. They don't like my morals, they don't have to - but my complying is not an option.   I would say something like, "Please leave me alone"

m2kbug

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Re: Hypothetical Airplane Question
« Reply #36 on: January 03, 2013, 11:52:48 PM »
I don't know that there's any reason I would *not* drink, and especially not because of someone's morals objections.  I actually found a bloody Mary keeps me from getting sick and throwing up and has worked much better than any number of drugs I have tried.  I guess I could respond with "nervous flyer" like someone else said.  Or as also mentioned, "Perhaps you would like to move."  Or a just plain, "Okay," as I proceed with my order.

If a person is an alcoholic, why is it my responsibility to not drink?  I certainly had no plans to share in the first place.

If the smell of alcohol makes a person ill, should they not be aware that they will be in close quarters with several people who will be potentially drinking?  Shouldn't it be their responsibility to find something to aid in this problem prior to getting on the plane? 

Why would it be my responsibility? 

delabela

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Re: Hypothetical Airplane Question
« Reply #37 on: January 03, 2013, 11:57:11 PM »
OK, but what would you say/do in response?  Would you blatantly ignore, pretend like you didn't hear, or actually say something?

I think a calm, polite "no thank you" would fit nicely to the request.  repeated if necessary.

"please don't drink alcohol"
"no thank you"

"Its immoral"
"no thank you"


You know, it's funny - reading this, I realized that this is my default tactic when I am confronted by an absurd request/demand.  I say 'no thank you.'  It seems to work even if it doesn't make sense - it doesn't offer much opportunity for more engagement.  In this case, I'd probably say 'no than you' or 'I'm fine thanks' and then immediately become extremely interested in whatever was happening on the side of the plane directly opposite my seat mate. 

blarg314

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Re: Hypothetical Airplane Question
« Reply #38 on: January 04, 2013, 12:28:55 AM »

I would not change my alcohol order due to someone's moral objections any more than I would wear a full hijab because my seat mate thought that women should not be out in public with skin showing.

I think my response would be a puzzled look, followed by continuing my order. Ie, pretend that they didn't say what they did, to give them a chance to back down. 

mindicherry

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Re: Hypothetical Airplane Question
« Reply #39 on: January 04, 2013, 01:36:27 AM »
The request is on moral grounds.
Not my problem.

Seriously - I could request MANY things on Moral Grounds.  I could request to never be sat next to an adulterer, idolator, worshipper of contrary religions, a lady not wearing a Muslim "beekeeper" outfit (whatever you call it).

Just because someone has a moral objection to something doesn't make it my obligation to please them. Why aren't they worrying about my desire/need to have a Chardonnay so that I don't have a panic attack when flying through the air at 700 mph in a metal tube?

Not saying it is your problem, but how would you respond to them?  What would you say/do?
Well - I don't have a **moral** need to have a drink when flying or even a physical need (except for the few times when I was bumped up to 1st class - because hey!  it's FREE there!)...but a stranger with whom i will have 2-7 hours contact with and then never see again in my life does not rank high on my list of people that I must bend over backwards to be nice to!

Me:  I'll have a Vodka Tonic please

Them:  please don't have that!  I don't want to be next to it

Me: Why? (giving them the opportunity to tell me that they just entered AA last week, in which case I WOULD change my order to a ginger ale!)

them:  Vodka is immoral (insert your shocking description here).  Ladies shouldn't be drinking that! I can't be next to anyone drinking alcohol!

Me:  Excuse me, Flight Attendant?  Can you make that a double? I think it's going to be a long flight!

Amava

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Re: Hypothetical Airplane Question
« Reply #40 on: January 04, 2013, 01:42:32 AM »
I don't respond, because that simply does not deserve a response in my honest opinion.
And because I would be too dumbfounded to think of a response, other than a raised eyebrow.

Or if she keeps going on at it, giving me enough time to find a response and I am in a mood that I'm inclined to do so or just to shut her down, I say "Alcohol is allowed on this flight. If this is a problem for you, take it up with the airline company. Don't impose your morals on random passengers. Thanks."

Or "Please mind your own business. You drink what you want and I'll drink what I want."

Disclaimer: I don't even drink alcohol myself (for medical reasons) but I have very little patience with people who try to impose their morals on others.

mindicherry

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Re: Hypothetical Airplane Question
« Reply #41 on: January 04, 2013, 01:43:17 AM »
I think I imagine the conversation would go like this:

Me (to FA): A Bloody Mary, please.

Seatmate: You shouldn't drink that.

Me: (Accepting drink from FA)

Seatmate: It's immoral.

Me: "..."

Me: (glug, glug, glug). Ahhh.

Me: FA, may I have another, please?

Seatmate: How dare you! I told you I want no part of this. It's immoral and I cannot accept this.

Me: (Accepting second delicious cocktail) FA, I believe my neighbor would like to move to another seat.

Me: (glug, glug)

Seatmate: Option A: Either gets relocated by FA or Option B: Does not get relocated. Begins loud, obnoxious lecture on all the reasons I will go to a dark and desolate location upon my death.

Me: (Chugging down third cocktail): Plugs in noise cancelling earphones.

Me: Relaxes.

Seatmate: Continues loud, angry rant about immorality of consuming alcohol.

Me: Continues to relax.

Seatmate: Escalates angry tirade.

FA: Orders seatmate to calm down

Me: Attempts to read book, while stealing glances at scene unfolding in aisle.

Seatmate: Continues emotional meltdown.

Me: Staring with incredulity at absurd scene unfolding in front of me.

FA: Calls for additional FA's. Places plastic handcuffs on seatmate. Relocates seatmate to quiet seat in isolated part of cabin.

Me: Returns to book. Requests another cocktail.

Aircraft eventually lands.

Me: Deplanes. Continues on to destination.

Seatmate: Is taken to dark and desolate location in airport to await questioning.

Me: Have interesting story for new friends during hotel's Happy Hour.

 ;D
I just fell in love with you (in a completely eHell approved manner)  ;)

Perfect Circle

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Re: Hypothetical Airplane Question
« Reply #42 on: January 04, 2013, 02:24:25 AM »
I'm pretty sure my only response would be a shrug.
Maybe he's caught in the legend
maybe he's caught in the mood
Maybe these maps and legends
Have been misunderstood

The map that you painted didn't seem real
He just sings whatever he's seen
Point to the legend, point to the east
Point to the yellow, red, and green

mrkitty

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Re: Hypothetical Airplane Question
« Reply #43 on: January 04, 2013, 02:38:04 AM »
I think I imagine the conversation would go like this:

Me (to FA): A Bloody Mary, please.

Seatmate: You shouldn't drink that.

Me: (Accepting drink from FA)

Seatmate: It's immoral.

Me: "..."

Me: (glug, glug, glug). Ahhh.

Me: FA, may I have another, please?

Seatmate: How dare you! I told you I want no part of this. It's immoral and I cannot accept this.

Me: (Accepting second delicious cocktail) FA, I believe my neighbor would like to move to another seat.

Me: (glug, glug)

Seatmate: Option A: Either gets relocated by FA or Option B: Does not get relocated. Begins loud, obnoxious lecture on all the reasons I will go to a dark and desolate location upon my death.

Me: (Chugging down third cocktail): Plugs in noise cancelling earphones.

Me: Relaxes.

Seatmate: Continues loud, angry rant about immorality of consuming alcohol.

Me: Continues to relax.

Seatmate: Escalates angry tirade.

FA: Orders seatmate to calm down

Me: Attempts to read book, while stealing glances at scene unfolding in aisle.

Seatmate: Continues emotional meltdown.

Me: Staring with incredulity at absurd scene unfolding in front of me.

FA: Calls for additional FA's. Places plastic handcuffs on seatmate. Relocates seatmate to quiet seat in isolated part of cabin.

Me: Returns to book. Requests another cocktail.

Aircraft eventually lands.

Me: Deplanes. Continues on to destination.

Seatmate: Is taken to dark and desolate location in airport to await questioning.

Me: Have interesting story for new friends during hotel's Happy Hour.

 ;D
I just fell in love with you (in a completely eHell approved manner)  ;)


{{HUGS}}, mindicherry!  ;D
Learn from past. Live in the present. Hope for the future.

Rusty

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Re: Hypothetical Airplane Question
« Reply #44 on: January 04, 2013, 05:43:27 AM »
Until airlines start allocating seats based on the passenger's moral beliefs I think you are within your right to reply, "I don't share your moral belief so I'm afraid your request is denied".  If the passenger objects to the serving of alcohol on airplanes, perhaps they should take their stance up with the airline industry.  What's next, banning children, people with hygiene issues, people who snore.  When you travel in close proximity to perfect strangers you know it might be uncomfortable, thats life.
« Last Edit: January 04, 2013, 05:45:32 AM by Rusty »