Author Topic: Hypothetical Airplane Question  (Read 4636 times)

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Victim Of Fate

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Re: Hypothetical Airplane Question
« Reply #60 on: January 04, 2013, 10:48:22 AM »
Yes, I was responding to the idea that somebody might react to the information that alcohol fumes make their seatmate nauseated with "That's not my concern".

I seem to be the only person to have used that phrase on this thread, and I was talking about if they claimed to have a moral issue with alcohol.

Obviously, saying "that's not my concern" to someone who felt sick would be both rude and inaccurate.

That said, where do you draw the line with this? What if the smell of meat made them feel nauseous? Would you not eat the turkey sandwich you had been looking forward to? What if it was the smell of airplane peanuts?

wolfie

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Re: Hypothetical Airplane Question
« Reply #61 on: January 04, 2013, 10:51:35 AM »
I'd probably just shrug and carry on.  I wouldn't really care.  Although if they said the smell of alcohol makes them vomit, there would be a tiny bit of self preservation, but then again, I'd expect them to not vomit on me either way, but rather in a bag which they then disposed of, so even then really I wouldn't care too much and would go about my life with my drink.

Just the sound of them vomiting would make me want to vomit so I would give up the drink in this case because I would want to avoid that!

Eden

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Re: Hypothetical Airplane Question
« Reply #62 on: January 04, 2013, 10:52:53 AM »
My verbal response would probably be, "No, I think I will still have my drink." And my non-verbal response would probably be along the lines of Mrkitty's post. My one drink would probably turn into 3. I recognize that is an unjustified, defiant response and is my own shortcoming. I'm just not sure I'd have the fortitude to beat the devil on my shoulder in that internal battle.

Outdoor Girl

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Re: Hypothetical Airplane Question
« Reply #63 on: January 04, 2013, 11:04:15 AM »
I suppose there are reasons this might be a relevant request. If someone said to me either "I'm sorry, but the smell would make me extremely ill," or even "I'm just out of rehab, and I would like to ask you, as a great favour, not to tempt me right now when I'm very vulnerable," I would certainly consider it.

"Because I consider drinking alcohol immoral?" Sorry, not a reason.

I agree.  I would consider cancelling my drink order in the first instances, since I don't need the drink to fly.  But if I did need the drink for the calming benefits, only the threat of my seatmate vomiting would make me reconsider.

'I'm afraid that won't be possible' and I'd put on my noise cancelling headphones for the remainder of the flight, if told it was on moral grounds.

And if there is a ruckus, I would call the FA and ask if one of us could be moved.  If there wasn't an equivalent seat available (I like an aisle), I wouldn't move and it would be up to my seatmate to decide if they wished to move or not.  I would take a window seat in First Class, though.   ;D
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wolfie

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Re: Hypothetical Airplane Question
« Reply #64 on: January 04, 2013, 11:14:30 AM »
Yes, I was responding to the idea that somebody might react to the information that alcohol fumes make their seatmate nauseated with "That's not my concern".

I seem to be the only person to have used that phrase on this thread, and I was talking about if they claimed to have a moral issue with alcohol.

Obviously, saying "that's not my concern" to someone who felt sick would be both rude and inaccurate.

That said, where do you draw the line with this? What if the smell of meat made them feel nauseous? Would you not eat the turkey sandwich you had been looking forward to? What if it was the smell of airplane peanuts?

I would give up a lot not to make the person next to me vomit. Hearing someone vomit and then smelling it would make me want to vomit and no drink or sandwich would be worth it to me. I would probably be ready to run off the plane at the end and would not be a happy camper but vomiting is just one thing i will avoid at all costs.

ettiquit

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Re: Hypothetical Airplane Question
« Reply #65 on: January 04, 2013, 11:17:09 AM »
Being new to AA is not a valid reason to not ask someone to drink.  If they can't handle being near the alcohol, they need to plan for that ahead of time.

I may honor the "it makes me sick" request, but would probably ask the FA to help them get a new seat.

On moral grounds?  I like the repeated "No thank you" tactic.

Twik

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Re: Hypothetical Airplane Question
« Reply #66 on: January 04, 2013, 11:23:40 AM »
That said, where do you draw the line with this? What if the smell of meat made them feel nauseous? Would you not eat the turkey sandwich you had been looking forward to? What if it was the smell of airplane peanuts?

I would give up a lot not to make the person next to me vomit. Hearing someone vomit and then smelling it would make me want to vomit and no drink or sandwich would be worth it to me. I would probably be ready to run off the plane at the end and would not be a happy camper but vomiting is just one thing i will avoid at all costs.

I think there is also some human decency involved. If someone would really suffer severe distress (and I would consider nausea while stuck in a plane seat pretty distressing), a decent person would put off eating the turkey or peanuts. My hunger is probably not as bad as their nausea. However, I would see if perhaps the flight attendants could rearrange the seating to eliminate the problem. If they are really worried about physical symptoms, not morality, that should be an acceptable solution.
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Victim Of Fate

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Re: Hypothetical Airplane Question
« Reply #67 on: January 04, 2013, 11:57:39 AM »
I think there is also some human decency involved. If someone would really suffer severe distress (and I would consider nausea while stuck in a plane seat pretty distressing), a decent person would put off eating the turkey or peanuts. My hunger is probably not as bad as their nausea. However, I would see if perhaps the flight attendants could rearrange the seating to eliminate the problem. If they are really worried about physical symptoms, not morality, that should be an acceptable solution.

Okay, so how about this hypothetical:

The person next to you feels nauseous at the smell of alcohol because they're so hungover from the night before? Does that elicit as much sympathy as if they were simply allergic to alcohol? Would it affect your course of action?

Outdoor Girl

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Re: Hypothetical Airplane Question
« Reply #68 on: January 04, 2013, 12:03:56 PM »
They wouldn't garner any sympathy at all from me but I would still consider cancelling my drink order because the sound/smell of vomiting would make me vomit.

And if the sound of my knitting needles ticking was giving them a headache? ' So sorry, perhaps you could purchase a pair of headphones so you can't hear them.'
I have CDO.  It is like OCD but with the letters in alphabetical order, as they should be.
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sparksals

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Re: Hypothetical Airplane Question
« Reply #69 on: January 04, 2013, 12:07:00 PM »
If the person has any issue with alcohol, type of food the seatmate is eating, the onus is on them to ask to be moved if it is so objectionable - including if it makes them sick.  I am diabetic.  If my food makes the person next to me sick, I still need to eat.  Whose need trumps? 

mrkitty

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Re: Hypothetical Airplane Question
« Reply #70 on: January 04, 2013, 12:13:32 PM »

Okay, so how about this hypothetical:

The person next to you feels nauseous at the smell of alcohol because they're so hungover from the night before? Does that elicit as much sympathy as if they were simply allergic to alcohol? Would it affect your course of action?
[/quote]




Offer a little hair of the dog. Cures hangovers every time.  :P ***



***Just kidding. I know that sounds terrible. I wouldn't do that. But, in all seriousness, if they were nauseous from being *that* hung over, they are probably not in any condition to fly in the first place...but if they do so anyway, just about any foodstuff or activity (or motion from the airplane in the first place) is likely to make them sick. In such a case, I would probably ask the FA to re-seat one of us just to ensure that I am *far* away from any vomit.
Learn from past. Live in the present. Hope for the future.

Outdoor Girl

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Re: Hypothetical Airplane Question
« Reply #71 on: January 04, 2013, 12:13:56 PM »
If the person has any issue with alcohol, type of food the seatmate is eating, the onus is on them to ask to be moved if it is so objectionable - including if it makes them sick.  I am diabetic.  If my food makes the person next to me sick, I still need to eat.  Whose need trumps?

Yours, absolutely.  I wouldn't 'need' to have a drink and not inducing vomiting in myself would be the only reason I would consider not imbibing.

A polite, 'Would you consider not eating/drinking that?  I'm afraid the smell will make me vomit' would go a lot further than 'You can't eat/drink that.  It will make me sick.'  In the first case, if it was something I didn't need to do, I would consider it.  In the second case, 'Tough luck, mate.  Maybe you should ask if it is possible to change your seat.'
I have CDO.  It is like OCD but with the letters in alphabetical order, as they should be.
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Twik

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Re: Hypothetical Airplane Question
« Reply #72 on: January 04, 2013, 12:29:34 PM »
I think there is also some human decency involved. If someone would really suffer severe distress (and I would consider nausea while stuck in a plane seat pretty distressing), a decent person would put off eating the turkey or peanuts. My hunger is probably not as bad as their nausea. However, I would see if perhaps the flight attendants could rearrange the seating to eliminate the problem. If they are really worried about physical symptoms, not morality, that should be an acceptable solution.

Okay, so how about this hypothetical:

The person next to you feels nauseous at the smell of alcohol because they're so hungover from the night before? Does that elicit as much sympathy as if they were simply allergic to alcohol? Would it affect your course of action?

If a person says they're nauseated, I'm not going to judge why.

Basically, airplanes are minor torture chambers most of the time. It makes life a little easier if people are considerate of each other. Ideally, moving the person feeling ill would be best, but often people who are truly ill will feel even worse at being moved. I will do what I can, within reason, to help fellow passengers. Hopefully, a little compromise will make everyone feel better.
My cousin's memoir of love and loneliness while raising a child with multiple disabilities will be out on Amazon soon! Know the Night, by Maria Mutch, has been called "full of hope, light, and companionship for surviving the small hours of the night."

sparksals

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Re: Hypothetical Airplane Question
« Reply #73 on: January 04, 2013, 01:20:11 PM »
If the person has any issue with alcohol, type of food the seatmate is eating, the onus is on them to ask to be moved if it is so objectionable - including if it makes them sick.  I am diabetic.  If my food makes the person next to me sick, I still need to eat.  Whose need trumps?

Yours, absolutely.  I wouldn't 'need' to have a drink and not inducing vomiting in myself would be the only reason I would consider not imbibing.

A polite, 'Would you consider not eating/drinking that?  I'm afraid the smell will make me vomit' would go a lot further than 'You can't eat/drink that.  It will make me sick.'  In the first case, if it was something I didn't need to do, I would consider it.  In the second case, 'Tough luck, mate.  Maybe you should ask if it is possible to change your seat.'

I think if they have the problem with it, it is their obligation to move.  If I want a drink, I will have a drink.  I am a nervous flyer and it eases my tension.   Even if I wasn't, I probably still wouldn't comply.   Besides, how far does the smell of a glass of wine travel?  The person could easily turn on their personal air circulator thing.   

What do they do at restaurants or other public places where people drink?