Etiquette School is in session! > "What an interesting assumption."

Another neighbourly disagreement - how to proceed?

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wheeitsme:

--- Quote from: JenJay on January 03, 2013, 11:07:47 PM ---She'd rather park in her neighbor's yard than her own driveway? That makes no sense to me. Doesn't it mean she has a longer walk to get into her home? Isn't it muddy when it rains?

As for what to do, hmmm. I suppose inviting all my friends to come park on her lawn would be retaliatory rudeness, eh? I'd probably decide to start putting out the sprinkler a lot more often.  >:D

--- End quote ---

Is there a way to set up some above ground sprinklers like these?  That way it's easier to take care of the grass, and it might help keep her off.  Especially if you put them on a timer...

http://www.whateverworks.com/itemdy00.aspx?T1=K9201&srccode=NXCKC6&utm_source=google&utm_medium=comparison&utm_campaign=datafeed&gclid=CJvBorjtzbQCFSmCQgodtiQA_Q

FizzyChip:
Hi, thanks for your replies.  and Yes, I agree it's a bit odd her not parking on her own property when she has ample room both on her own driveway and lawn.  It is a longer walk for her, but as for the muddy arguement, we're in Australia and to be honest we don't get a lot of rain to turn it into mud.  I am only guessing that she does not want to wear her own lawn or risk her reticulation by parking in her own front yard, she's never actually answered my question as to "why?".

I have called the local authoirities and yes, there is little legal recourse we can take, it is public property, even if her reasoning is off and our request has turned into a vendetta!

I do like the suggestion of the strategically placed splrinklers though and I never thought of that.  Perhaps we should try planting a tree too.  Will let you know how we go!

Shoo:
I would plant as many trees as the space will hold.  But choose trees that don't get too big!

And I'd consider motion-sensor sprinklers too!   :P

JenJay:
I was telling DH about this and he said he'd find out if we could put in raised flower beds. I like the trees, too, except I wonder if the city could charge you for their removal if they ever need to widen the road. At least beds would be easier & cheaper to take out if you had to.  :-\

JadeAngel:

--- Quote from: FizzyChip on January 04, 2013, 12:23:59 AM ---Hi, thanks for your replies.  and Yes, I agree it's a bit odd her not parking on her own property when she has ample room both on her own driveway and lawn.  It is a longer walk for her, but as for the muddy arguement, we're in Australia and to be honest we don't get a lot of rain to turn it into mud.  I am only guessing that she does not want to wear her own lawn or risk her reticulation by parking in her own front yard, she's never actually answered my question as to "why?".
--- End quote ---

I would say this is why, if she is garden proud she would not want to risk killing her lawn or tearing up her sprinklers by parking on her own garden so she parks on yours.

Plant a tree but make sure she knows you're doing it otherwise if she pulls onto the lawn and hits it she could claim that you are liable for damage to her car. Best to make it a native/local tree as well, most councils prefer them to imports.

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