A Civil World. Off-topic discussions on a variety of topics. > Time For a Coffee Break!

"Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing

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Hollanda:

--- Quote from: Hazmat on February 26, 2013, 08:58:26 PM ---
--- Quote from: Diane AKA Traska on February 26, 2013, 02:43:35 PM ---
--- Quote from: Hollanda on February 26, 2013, 01:05:26 PM ---
--- Quote from: ladyknight1 on February 26, 2013, 09:53:38 AM ---My boo as referring to one's significant other. Especially when written!

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It took me some time to figure out what that meant!!


I also hate "Meh" when someone else can't effectively communicate feelings by using actual words!!!!!

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In my case, "meh" is the actual word.  Its definition is "neutrally ambivalent to the point of malaise or complete disinterest."

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I'm neutrally ambivalent about "meh" 8)

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I see what you did there!!!!! ;D 

cabbageweevil:
Occurred to me recently, out of the blue: "for free".

Not an expression which bothers me much ("life's too short") -- although I don't think I'd ever use it, in speech or writing; but I have a friend who loathes it with a passion. He is a great pedant about language-use of all kinds; and "for free" is one of many things on that scene, which make him furiously angry.  Basis: in proper English, if something has a cost / price ("in cash and / or kind"), it's "for" whatever that price is -- if it has no cost, then it's just "free".

My friend tells me of how, some fifty years ago, he and his schoolfriends used "for free" as a satirical, gently authority-mocking, joke and catchphrase -- because everybody knew it was nonsensical (see above).  They would never use it "in real life".  It makes him apoplectic that nowadays, it has come to be the common usage re something which one does not have to pay for -- shows up regularly and frequently even in British "quality" newspapers.  In principle, I see his point -- in practice, I think it not a hill to die on or otherwise dramatically and spectacularly end one's life over. Language is a democracy, and changes and evolves... and I see the alliterativeness of "for free", as likely being irresistible.

Wonder whether "for free", is a tiresome trendy expression (or worse) for anyone else on the board?

jaxsue:
Don't know if this has been mentioned: sprinkle, as in mini-shower. If it quacks like a duck and walks like a duck, then it's a duck. Or, in other words, it's a shower.

Piratelvr1121:
I hear "sprinkle" and I admit, I think of something that's done in the bathroom that, depending on gender, one can do sitting down or standing up.  Which makes the idea of a "sprinkle" as a modified baby shower rather unappealing.

Sebastienne:

--- Quote from: Piratelvr1121 on March 06, 2013, 05:51:10 PM ---I hear "sprinkle" and I admit, I think of something that's done in the bathroom that, depending on gender, one can do sitting down or standing up.  Which makes the idea of a "sprinkle" as a modified baby shower rather unappealing.

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To me, a "baby sprinkle" sounds less like a party and more like an unpleasant diaper changing incident.

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