Author Topic: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing  (Read 52406 times)

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Sharnita

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Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
« Reply #150 on: January 07, 2013, 06:45:06 PM »
Even worse, amahhhzing

CharlieBraun

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Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
« Reply #151 on: January 07, 2013, 07:39:29 PM »
A restaurant near my b/f's had a sign up for their breakfast special: "Ermagerd, perncerks!"

See, I think this is from a Kristin Wiig character from Saturday Night Live - the Target Lady.  Someone upthread was thinking it was making fun of an unavoidable speech situation, but I'm thinking it's the Target Lady.

Still and all....so, so annoying.  It's funny the first 100 times...maybe.
"We ate the pies."

DottyG

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Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
« Reply #152 on: January 07, 2013, 07:41:44 PM »
CharlieBraun, it comes from here: http://knowyourmeme.com/memes/ermahgerd


CharlieBraun

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Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
« Reply #153 on: January 07, 2013, 08:01:01 PM »
That's interesting Dotty.  When I saw it spelled, I heard (in my head) this:

http://www.nbc.com/saturday-night-live/video/target-lady/1379125/
"We ate the pies."

Yankee-Belle

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Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
« Reply #154 on: January 07, 2013, 08:05:13 PM »
A few that drive me up the wall is when I say thank you, I receive these responses:

"no worries"
"no problem"
"it's all good"

What happened to you're welcome?

jedikaiti

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Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
« Reply #155 on: January 07, 2013, 08:14:03 PM »
Someone mention "swag", and that reminded me of someone I know who uses (overuses, really) the word "swagtastic".  I was thinking, "Okay, I know the 'tastic' part came from the word 'fantastic', but now I have to look up 'swag' to make sure this isn't an insult..."

Nope, it isn't.  It just sounds strange to me.

OK, I am lost. "Swag" to me means 2 things - either the trash & trinkets you get for free, typically at a convention, or SWAG = Scientific Wild-A**ed Guess
What part of v_e = \sqrt{\frac{2GM}{r}} don't you understand? It's only rocket science!

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DottyG

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Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
« Reply #156 on: January 07, 2013, 08:17:44 PM »
CharlieBraun, that's not where the word came from but I do have to say that that clip is, ummmm, disturbing.  Yikes!


Yvaine

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Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
« Reply #157 on: January 07, 2013, 08:18:45 PM »
A few that drive me up the wall is when I say thank you, I receive these responses:

"no worries"
"no problem"
"it's all good"

What happened to you're welcome?

A response meaning, essentially, "It's no trouble at all," is actually pretty common around the world. In Spanish, for example, you might say "de nada" which means essentially "it's nothing." They're not meaning to insult or annoy you, they're telling you they're happy to do a nice thing for you and that you're not putting them out at all.

cabbageweevil

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Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
« Reply #158 on: January 07, 2013, 08:58:47 PM »
A few that drive me up the wall is when I say thank you, I receive these responses:

"no worries"
"no problem"
"it's all good"

What happened to you're welcome?

A response meaning, essentially, "It's no trouble at all," is actually pretty common around the world. In Spanish, for example, you might say "de nada" which means essentially "it's nothing." They're not meaning to insult or annoy you, they're telling you they're happy to do a nice thing for you and that you're not putting them out at all.

Some people whom I knew, very long ago, adventurously went on holiday to what was then Czechoslovakia. They tried to master a few basic phrases in the local language, including “thank you very much”; which I gather is something like (anglicised), “motskrat dyekuyi”. Being fairly averagely-silly late-teenagers, they were tickled by this phrase, which they morphed into “muskrat thank-you”. From which they developed a joke by which every time one of the party did something thank-worthy for another, the “thanker” said “muskrat thank-you”; to which the “thankee” had to make a reply involving a North American fauna specimen, and a variation on a gracious response to “thank you” – both, different every time.

Such as – timber wolf you’re welcome
                bison that’s quite OK
                skunk my pleasure
                bear not at all
                cougar no problem
                musk-ox the pleasure is mine
                bald eagle no worries
                raccoon likewise
                opossum no trouble
                beaver that’s fine
                wolverine glad to help
                roadrunner it’s good
                caribou happy to be of service
                coyote that’s all right
                mountain lion not in the least
                cardinal prosim (getting desperate – Czech for “please” – acceptable local 
                “thanks-response”)

The party being all Brits with a less-than-encyclopedic knowledge of North American fauna, both repertoires were run out of before long; but I understand that it was fun while it lasted.


Piratelvr1121

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Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
« Reply #159 on: January 07, 2013, 09:55:24 PM »
"Awesome!", probably the most overused word in the english language, IMO, and usually applied to things that are far less than that. The miracle of life, the vastness of the universe, or the devastating power of a Category 5 hurricane, for example- tose are things that are truly awesome. But if the fact that I agreed to a simple request, or that I ordered a burger from someone's restaurant menu is sufficient to fill a person with a sense of awe and wonder, they are very easily impressed!

That reminds me of a Bill Engvall routine where he talks about people overusing "awesome"

People, usually teen girls, squealing "OH EM GEEEEEEEEEE!" is like nails on a chalkboard to me.  Abbreviations are for when you want to save space and have a character limit. Just say "Oh My Gosh!"
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CakeEater

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Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
« Reply #160 on: January 07, 2013, 10:43:54 PM »
Apparently it's some woman named Rhonda.  I still don't get it, but that's all I'm able to find about this "sunrise" thing.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HW_kKUWlslo

There's a series of ads for an insurance comapny in Australia - this is one of them.

The drinks server in Bali tells Rhonda, who's a pretty average-looking woman, moreso since she has the glasses tan, that she looks hot today - like a sunrise.

It's just kind of an odd ending to the sentence, and it's become a bit of a phrase here.

DottyG

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Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
« Reply #161 on: January 07, 2013, 10:48:39 PM »
I abhor what CRUD MONKEYS! stands for, and I wish the abbreviation and the expanded version would disappear. It's offensive to me, and I hate that it's become so mainstream.


CrochetFanatic

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Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
« Reply #162 on: January 08, 2013, 12:51:19 AM »
Someone mention "swag", and that reminded me of someone I know who uses (overuses, really) the word "swagtastic".  I was thinking, "Okay, I know the 'tastic' part came from the word 'fantastic', but now I have to look up 'swag' to make sure this isn't an insult..."

Nope, it isn't.  It just sounds strange to me.

OK, I am lost. "Swag" to me means 2 things - either the trash & trinkets you get for free, typically at a convention, or SWAG = Scientific Wild-A**ed Guess

Copied straight from the Urban Dictionary: "swagtastic is when you have amazing game (swag,swagger)
Swagtastic derives from the words swagger+fantastic, so literally swagtastic means having fantastic swagger." 

I was lost too, which is why I was wondering if I'd been insulted when someone online called me "swagtastic".  I was thinking, "Um...thanks?  ???"

wendelenn

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Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
« Reply #163 on: January 08, 2013, 12:54:51 AM »
Here in the UK, a couple of years ago, someone invented the term 'yummy mummy', referring to an attractive woman with children. It drives me up the wall, for no real reason. I think it's just the childishness of the term.


That's bad, but not quite as bad as one of my peeves: MILF (Mom I'd like to eff)
"I don't mean to be rude", he began, in a tone that threatened rudeness in every syllable.

"--yet sadly, accidental rudeness occurs alarmingly often," Dumbledore finished the sentence gravely.  "Best to say nothing at all."

Iris

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Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
« Reply #164 on: January 08, 2013, 01:06:27 AM »
Here in the UK, a couple of years ago, someone invented the term 'yummy mummy', referring to an attractive woman with children. It drives me up the wall, for no real reason. I think it's just the childishness of the term.


That's bad, but not quite as bad as one of my peeves: MILF (Mom I'd like to eff)

Is THAT what that stands for??!!?? Ew. That's all I can say. Ew.
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Poirot thought you could, but forebore to say so.