Author Topic: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing  (Read 55785 times)

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BabylonSister

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Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
« Reply #330 on: January 21, 2013, 01:29:55 PM »


Along that line, "I want to wife her".  I think this is possibly a bad translation, but it keeps cropping up on a page I visit and it is aggravating.


How odd.  Some of those neologisms feel a void but that one? I don't see the need for it. 

JeanFromBNA

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Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
« Reply #331 on: January 21, 2013, 01:59:43 PM »
"Long story short:" 

You just made it longer.

Diane AKA Traska

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Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
« Reply #332 on: January 21, 2013, 02:09:05 PM »
Along those lines:  "Someone who needs no introduction", proceeds to introduce anyway.
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Layla Miller

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Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
« Reply #333 on: January 21, 2013, 04:39:04 PM »
Along those lines:  "Someone who needs no introduction", proceeds to introduce anyway.

That reminds me of an episode of Futurama, in which Bender stands at the podium and says, "And now, a man who needs no introduction," and immediately sits back down.  After a few moments of awkward silence, he leans over to hiss, "Fry, get up there!"

The one that bugs me is "little man" to refer to a male child.  I can't put my finger on exactly why it bugs me, other than that I don't see little boys as miniature adults.  They're boys, not men.  I think part of it is that there's not really a female equivalent.  Little girls remain little girls, not little women.  Unless they're in a book by Louisa May Alcott.  ;D
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twiggy

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Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
« Reply #334 on: January 21, 2013, 04:48:58 PM »
Along those lines:  "Someone who needs no introduction", proceeds to introduce anyway.

That reminds me of an episode of Futurama, in which Bender stands at the podium and says, "And now, a man who needs no introduction," and immediately sits back down.  After a few moments of awkward silence, he leans over to hiss, "Fry, get up there!"

The one that bugs me is "little man" to refer to a male child.  I can't put my finger on exactly why it bugs me, other than that I don't see little boys as miniature adults.  They're boys, not men.  I think part of it is that there's not really a female equivalent.  Little girls remain little girls, not little women.  Unless they're in a book by Louisa May Alcott.  ;D

I've used the term "little lady" referring to DD and niece. But not often. Young Man/Lady is much more typical
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Layla Miller

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Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
« Reply #335 on: January 21, 2013, 04:56:51 PM »
Along those lines:  "Someone who needs no introduction", proceeds to introduce anyway.

That reminds me of an episode of Futurama, in which Bender stands at the podium and says, "And now, a man who needs no introduction," and immediately sits back down.  After a few moments of awkward silence, he leans over to hiss, "Fry, get up there!"

The one that bugs me is "little man" to refer to a male child.  I can't put my finger on exactly why it bugs me, other than that I don't see little boys as miniature adults.  They're boys, not men.  I think part of it is that there's not really a female equivalent.  Little girls remain little girls, not little women.  Unless they're in a book by Louisa May Alcott.  ;D

I've used the term "little lady" referring to DD and niece. But not often. Young Man/Lady is much more typical

"Little lady" bugs me a little bit, too, though not as much.  I think I associate with someone peering down their nose and saying "Little ladies don't climb trees/play with trucks/etc."  (Not saying you would say something like that--just a weird quirk of my own.  :))
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twiggy

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Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
« Reply #336 on: January 21, 2013, 05:17:52 PM »

I've used the term "little lady" referring to DD and niece. But not often. Young Man/Lady is much more typical

"Little lady" bugs me a little bit, too, though not as much.  I think I associate with someone peering down their nose and saying "Little ladies don't climb trees/play with trucks/etc."  (Not saying you would say something like that--just a weird quirk of my own.  :))

Lol, my little lady is just as rough and tumble as her brother. For me, it's more "little ladies don't put bananas in their hair/shriek at Mommy/run in the store" (she's almost 2 :)) or "what a sweet little lady, thank you for sitting so nicely/getting in your carseat/putting away toys"

But I think I'm a bit unusual in that regard. I don't know anyone else IRL who refers to their young children as ladies/gentlemen. I frequently tell 4yo DS that I am raising a gentleman, not a barbarian.
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Mental Magpie

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Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
« Reply #337 on: January 21, 2013, 05:23:29 PM »
To me, "Little Lady" is what a husband calls his wife as a term of endearment when speaking directly to her.

To me, "Little Man" is a term of endearment for a male child, kind of like "Champ" or "Sport".
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flowersintheattic

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Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
« Reply #338 on: January 21, 2013, 08:28:59 PM »
Along those lines:  "Someone who needs no introduction", proceeds to introduce anyway.

That reminds me of an episode of Futurama, in which Bender stands at the podium and says, "And now, a man who needs no introduction," and immediately sits back down.  After a few moments of awkward silence, he leans over to hiss, "Fry, get up there!"

The one that bugs me is "little man" to refer to a male child.  I can't put my finger on exactly why it bugs me, other than that I don't see little boys as miniature adults.  They're boys, not men.  I think part of it is that there's not really a female equivalent.  Little girls remain little girls, not little women.  Unless they're in a book by Louisa May Alcott.  ;D

I don't mind "little man" if it's used as a term of endearment directly to the child - like saying "Way to go, little man!" - but I don't like the idea of someone using it to describe a child to another adult.

It's been a long time since someone mentioned it, but I loathe the terms "hubs" and "hubby," along with "wifey." They make my skin crawl. I also don't like the cutesy pregnant terms, like prego or preggers, or referring to babies and "bubs" or "bubbee," but I don't see that one as much.

And it was a few pages back, but when someone brought up "fetch," all I could think of was Regina George from "Mean Girls": "Stop trying to make fetch happen. It's never going to happen!"

ETA: I'm watching "The Wire" and they just used the term "Little Man."
« Last Edit: January 21, 2013, 08:30:49 PM by flowersintheattic »
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Iris

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Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
« Reply #339 on: January 21, 2013, 08:49:20 PM »
Along those lines:  "Someone who needs no introduction", proceeds to introduce anyway.

That reminds me of an episode of Futurama, in which Bender stands at the podium and says, "And now, a man who needs no introduction," and immediately sits back down.  After a few moments of awkward silence, he leans over to hiss, "Fry, get up there!"

The one that bugs me is "little man" to refer to a male child.  I can't put my finger on exactly why it bugs me, other than that I don't see little boys as miniature adults.  They're boys, not men.  I think part of it is that there's not really a female equivalent.  Little girls remain little girls, not little women.  Unless they're in a book by Louisa May Alcott.  ;D

This is interesting because I know that I have occasionally used this term before and you're right, I don't say "Little Woman". After reflection, I think it may be because there are fewer really noticeable physical changes in boys - their beards get shaved off, puberty changes are better hidden by clothing, and so on. So there have been times when my stocky toddler nephew is standing next to his dad, 'helping' with a job, with a very serious and grown up expression on his face that he quite literally looks like a "little man".
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diesel_darlin

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Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
« Reply #340 on: January 21, 2013, 08:51:04 PM »
A friend on FB just used "hit me up". It immediately reminded me to come and tell this thread how much I hate that phrase.

Yarnspinner

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Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
« Reply #341 on: January 21, 2013, 11:48:53 PM »
Woman's World magazine drives me insane with the use of certain words...they are perfectly normal words and do not bother me except when used within the magazine (which I buy on occasion because I cannot always resist articles promising me "easy ways to be happy").  Among the phrases/words that send me running for a drink and some dark chocolate:

1) Instead of (fattening item) enjoy (woefully small amount of item that is no where near as good as fattening item).  Example  "Instead of having a scoop of red velvet ice cream, enjoy four ounces of plain greek yogurt with sliced strawberries."  Plain Greek yogurt with strawberries may be good, but if what I want is B&JU's Red Velvet Ice Cream, I am NOT going to "enjoy" that yogurt.

2) This also goes for the word "sip".  Instead of a can of Diet Cola, sip ice water with mint and limes steeped in it."  or "Sip green tea"

3) "Easy Ways to Stretch Your Budget"  "Easy ways to Fall Asleep"  "Easy" followed by just about anything that is followed by ideas that you have been trying your whole life and are not just difficult, they mostly never work.

4)  "You see".  Used in the short romantic fiction (I remember a time when Woman's World had three or four page short stories that were often a great deal of fun to read.  Now it's like reading a dear diary insert".  Anyway, the person writing/telling the story(be it fiction or nonfiction) will relate a lengthy episode at the beginning and then back up and start off with "You see, we had been having financial difficulties...."  or whater... In fiction if yu are usuing that phrase you are telling rather than showing your audience.  In nonfiction, you shouldn't have to address the reader in that way because you shouldn't have been starting out with a teaser scene anyway.  In either cae, those two words are like nails on a blackboard and usually signal lazy writing to me.

And yet I will suddenly decide I need to read something and fork over my two dollars to read articles which feature all my least favorite words and phrases a dozen times.  It could be a drinking game for readers.

Shoo

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Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
« Reply #342 on: January 21, 2013, 11:58:56 PM »
Along those lines:  "Someone who needs no introduction", proceeds to introduce anyway.

That reminds me of an episode of Futurama, in which Bender stands at the podium and says, "And now, a man who needs no introduction," and immediately sits back down.  After a few moments of awkward silence, he leans over to hiss, "Fry, get up there!"

The one that bugs me is "little man" to refer to a male child.  I can't put my finger on exactly why it bugs me, other than that I don't see little boys as miniature adults.  They're boys, not men.  I think part of it is that there's not really a female equivalent.  Little girls remain little girls, not little women.  Unless they're in a book by Louisa May Alcott.  ;D

This is interesting because I know that I have occasionally used this term before and you're right, I don't say "Little Woman". After reflection, I think it may be because there are fewer really noticeable physical changes in boys - their beards get shaved off, puberty changes are better hidden by clothing, and so on. So there have been times when my stocky toddler nephew is standing next to his dad, 'helping' with a job, with a very serious and grown up expression on his face that he quite literally looks like a "little man".

I used to call my daughter Little Missy.

scotcat60

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Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
« Reply #343 on: January 22, 2013, 04:11:03 AM »
 think scotcat60 means that celebrities are adopting the use of "civilians" for anyone not a celebrity, not the military sense of the word.

Yes, that was my understanding of the way the term was used. We are indeed all civilians if we are not in the military, but we usually say "Other people" when referring to other people.

CakeEater

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Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
« Reply #344 on: January 22, 2013, 04:30:53 AM »
I like little man.

However, I have never in my life heard 'Little lady' used as a term of endearment for a grown woman.