Author Topic: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing  (Read 45766 times)

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Piratelvr1121

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Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
« Reply #375 on: January 23, 2013, 09:10:00 AM »
The last one bugs me because Halloween is one of my favorite holidays and I am Christian. It's fine if people choose not to for religious convictions but to imply they're better Christians for not participating is irksome.
Beyond a wholesome discipline, be gentle with yourself. You are a child of the universe, no less than the trees and the stars.  You have a right to be here. Be cheerful, strive to be happy. -Desiderata

DaisyG

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Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
« Reply #376 on: January 23, 2013, 09:16:10 AM »
My least favourite word is 'incident' especially on the train announcements near here - e.g. "This train is delayed due to an earlier incident" which gives me no information at all! There was recently a small fire on a train while I was on my way to work. The power was cut to all trains in the area for a few minutes so everything got delayed. The driver of the train I was on kept us up-to-date with what was happening but when I got off, the announcer was just saying that all trains in the area were delayed after an 'incident' with no other information.

Actually, my experience says that "incident" usually gives you a pretty good clue that the problem is  a bit more serious than a signal failure.

If it's a technical failure (or line-side vandalisation), they tend to say so. (The number of times I've heard "Sorry for the delay which was caused by thieves stealing the signaling cable" is really quite disturbing!)

If it's because of a crash/fire/something serious that they don't want people to talk about/cause a panic over, it's called an "incident".

And look on the bright side, at least they're telling you SOMETHING! Having been involved in a (minor) train crash, where we were stuck in the middle-of-nowhere Ohio for six hours without any actual announcement of what happened OR how long we were going to be stuck there, I'll take "incident" any day!

I think the reason I dislike it is because I have heard it used for everything from signal failures and not enough staffing to serious derailments, not just the more serious stuff.

BabylonSister

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Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
« Reply #377 on: January 23, 2013, 09:23:54 AM »


Essentially any unnecessary shortening of words and/or deliberate misspellings, like "imma" instead of "I'm going to". Why? WHY DOES THIS HAPPEN?




"Imma" is not a misspelling; it's a transcription of the way it's pronounced, like "gonna" or "wanna".

Twik

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Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
« Reply #378 on: January 23, 2013, 09:31:17 AM »
"As a..." also drives me nuts because it always kind of feels like if you don't think this, then you're not a real X. Like, if someone said "As a feminist, I think this smutty book should be banned." If I don't want the book banned, am I not a real feminist? It feels like people are trying to speak for the whole group, to speak with the weight of the whole group, even if the group is not actually that monolithic.

Another example that comes up here every year is that somebody's neighbor will say "As a Christian, I don't celebrate Halloween" to the Christian ehellion who is celebrating Halloween as they speak.

On the other hand, people often want to explain that they are taking a particular stand because of their political/religious/philosophical principles.
My cousin's memoir of love and loneliness while raising a child with multiple disabilities will be out on Amazon soon! Know the Night, by Maria Mutch, has been called "full of hope, light, and companionship for surviving the small hours of the night."

Coley

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Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
« Reply #379 on: January 23, 2013, 09:46:17 AM »
"Double down."

It seems I cannot read a news article or watch a news program these days without someone doubling down about something.
« Last Edit: January 23, 2013, 10:19:16 AM by Coley »

Twik

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Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
« Reply #380 on: January 23, 2013, 10:02:02 AM »
"Winding down".

Things used to "wind up". The image that gave me was of a finale, after which you knew the event was concluded. "Winding down" makes me think of one of those parties where people end up getting bored and drifting away from, because they're not sure whether the party is over or not. "Winding down" sounds so disorganized.
My cousin's memoir of love and loneliness while raising a child with multiple disabilities will be out on Amazon soon! Know the Night, by Maria Mutch, has been called "full of hope, light, and companionship for surviving the small hours of the night."

Piratelvr1121

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Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
« Reply #381 on: January 23, 2013, 10:26:50 AM »
"Like a boss!"
Beyond a wholesome discipline, be gentle with yourself. You are a child of the universe, no less than the trees and the stars.  You have a right to be here. Be cheerful, strive to be happy. -Desiderata

Dalek

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Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
« Reply #382 on: January 23, 2013, 10:30:54 AM »
Phrases like " Because I said so" , " Because, that's why", or " It just is that way" really annoy me. It's like the person wants to debate but doesn't want to put any work into his argument.
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Yvaine

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Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
« Reply #383 on: January 23, 2013, 10:42:12 AM »
"As a..." also drives me nuts because it always kind of feels like if you don't think this, then you're not a real X. Like, if someone said "As a feminist, I think this smutty book should be banned." If I don't want the book banned, am I not a real feminist? It feels like people are trying to speak for the whole group, to speak with the weight of the whole group, even if the group is not actually that monolithic.

Another example that comes up here every year is that somebody's neighbor will say "As a Christian, I don't celebrate Halloween" to the Christian ehellion who is celebrating Halloween as they speak.

On the other hand, people often want to explain that they are taking a particular stand because of their political/religious/philosophical principles.

Well, of course. But I think it's more polite and less annoying to use wording that doesn't sound like one is speaking for the entire group. Why not just speak for yourself? "I think this is sexist." "I feel this is morally wrong."

cabbageweevil

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Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
« Reply #384 on: January 23, 2013, 12:14:59 PM »
"Winding down".

Things used to "wind up". The image that gave me was of a finale, after which you knew the event was concluded. "Winding down" makes me think of one of those parties where people end up getting bored and drifting away from, because they're not sure whether the party is over or not. "Winding down" sounds so disorganized.

A big hate of mine. Largely in my case, personal -- was a favourite expression of the smug, pedantic idiot headmaster of the fifth-rate private school which I attended. Largely because of the ludicrous accent in which (this was in the UK) he spoke -- "u-ine-deeng dooowne" -- still makes me angry, fifty years after.

twiggy

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Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
« Reply #385 on: January 23, 2013, 12:41:20 PM »
"Winding down".

Things used to "wind up". The image that gave me was of a finale, after which you knew the event was concluded. "Winding down" makes me think of one of those parties where people end up getting bored and drifting away from, because they're not sure whether the party is over or not. "Winding down" sounds so disorganized.

A big hate of mine. Largely in my case, personal -- was a favourite expression of the smug, pedantic idiot headmaster of the fifth-rate private school which I attended. Largely because of the ludicrous accent in which (this was in the UK) he spoke -- "u-ine-deeng dooowne" -- still makes me angry, fifty years after.

I need to hone my reading comprehension skills. I read hamster, and was confused about how a small rodent could have a smug, pedantic (facial) expression. Then, when the hamster started talking, that really hurt my head.
In the United States today, there is a pervasive tendency to treat children as adults, and adults as children.  The options of children are thus steadily expanded, while those of adults are progressively constricted.  The result is unruly children and childish adults.  ~Thomas Szasz

Twik

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Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
« Reply #386 on: January 23, 2013, 01:45:36 PM »
Hamsters are usually cool, but gerbils can be SOOOO arrogant at times.
My cousin's memoir of love and loneliness while raising a child with multiple disabilities will be out on Amazon soon! Know the Night, by Maria Mutch, has been called "full of hope, light, and companionship for surviving the small hours of the night."

jaxsue

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Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
« Reply #387 on: January 23, 2013, 02:21:04 PM »
*ahem*
It pains me to even write these out:

- "welp" (as a replacement for "well" in the written word, as in "welp, I'm off to bed")
- "cray" (because it's too hard to say "crazy"???)

Essentially any unnecessary shortening of words and/or deliberate misspellings, like "imma" instead of "I'm going to". Why? WHY DOES THIS HAPPEN?

Sorry... I do most of my communicating in the written form, and these just drive me up the wall and make me lose hope for the future of the written word.

We are kindred souls.  :)

Hillia

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Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
« Reply #388 on: January 23, 2013, 02:47:15 PM »
Adressing an unknown audience as 'people'...'People, read the signs!'  'It's not difficult, people!'  It sounds so condescending.

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cabbageweevil

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Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
« Reply #389 on: January 23, 2013, 03:49:30 PM »
"Winding down".

Things used to "wind up". The image that gave me was of a finale, after which you knew the event was concluded. "Winding down" makes me think of one of those parties where people end up getting bored and drifting away from, because they're not sure whether the party is over or not. "Winding down" sounds so disorganized.

A big hate of mine. Largely in my case, personal -- was a favourite expression of the smug, pedantic idiot headmaster of the fifth-rate private school which I attended. Largely because of the ludicrous accent in which (this was in the UK) he spoke -- "u-ine-deeng dooowne" -- still makes me angry, fifty years after.

I need to hone my reading comprehension skills. I read hamster, and was confused about how a small rodent could have a smug, pedantic (facial) expression. Then, when the hamster started talking, that really hurt my head.
twiggy -- I take it that (as it seems) you ultimately got, that the word was "headmaster", not "hamster". I'll say no more.