Author Topic: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing  (Read 50403 times)

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Iris

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Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
« Reply #390 on: January 23, 2013, 04:16:57 PM »


Essentially any unnecessary shortening of words and/or deliberate misspellings, like "imma" instead of "I'm going to". Why? WHY DOES THIS HAPPEN?




"Imma" is not a misspelling; it's a transcription of the way it's pronounced, like "gonna" or "wanna".

I thing that's fairly generous. I mean it misses the entire middle word and then ends up sounding like something else very common. The first time my daughter played the Gosh-awful song "Imma be" in my presence I really heard "I'm a bee" for the first bit until they started including other lyrics. The *first* time I heard it was Kanye and his infamous awards interruption and I honestly thought that he was just accidentally missing a whole word out of his sentence. Given how clearly he was on *something* I just kept on thinking that until I heard it somewhere else.

I mean, if you say "gunna" with a broad enough Australian accent it sounds like "gunner", but I don't think those are two really easily confused words. I understand language evolves, and I understand urban groups often want their own private language, I just don't have to be happy about it  :)
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bansidhe

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Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
« Reply #391 on: January 23, 2013, 05:07:14 PM »
Adressing an unknown audience as 'people'...'People, read the signs!'  'It's not difficult, people!'  It sounds so condescending.

I'd forgotten about that one. It thoroughly irks me also, and for the same reason.
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Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
« Reply #392 on: January 23, 2013, 05:28:53 PM »


Essentially any unnecessary shortening of words and/or deliberate misspellings, like "imma" instead of "I'm going to". Why? WHY DOES THIS HAPPEN?




"Imma" is not a misspelling; it's a transcription of the way it's pronounced, like "gonna" or "wanna".

I thing that's fairly generous. I mean it misses the entire middle word and then ends up sounding like something else very common. The first time my daughter played the Gosh-awful song "Imma be" in my presence I really heard "I'm a bee" for the first bit until they started including other lyrics. The *first* time I heard it was Kanye and his infamous awards interruption and I honestly thought that he was just accidentally missing a whole word out of his sentence. Given how clearly he was on *something* I just kept on thinking that until I heard it somewhere else.

I mean, if you say "gunna" with a broad enough Australian accent it sounds like "gunner", but I don't think those are two really easily confused words. I understand language evolves, and I understand urban groups often want their own private language, I just don't have to be happy about it  :)

I think she's spot on, actually.  "I'm going to" changed to "I'm gunna" to "I'mma", just shortening each time.
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Iris

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Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
« Reply #393 on: January 23, 2013, 06:07:53 PM »


Essentially any unnecessary shortening of words and/or deliberate misspellings, like "imma" instead of "I'm going to". Why? WHY DOES THIS HAPPEN?




"Imma" is not a misspelling; it's a transcription of the way it's pronounced, like "gonna" or "wanna".

I thing that's fairly generous. I mean it misses the entire middle word and then ends up sounding like something else very common. The first time my daughter played the Gosh-awful song "Imma be" in my presence I really heard "I'm a bee" for the first bit until they started including other lyrics. The *first* time I heard it was Kanye and his infamous awards interruption and I honestly thought that he was just accidentally missing a whole word out of his sentence. Given how clearly he was on *something* I just kept on thinking that until I heard it somewhere else.

I mean, if you say "gunna" with a broad enough Australian accent it sounds like "gunner", but I don't think those are two really easily confused words. I understand language evolves, and I understand urban groups often want their own private language, I just don't have to be happy about it  :)

I think she's spot on, actually.  "I'm going to" changed to "I'm gunna" to "I'mma", just shortening each time.

Oh, I wasn't disagreeing with the theory, I was just having my little middle-aged tantrum because I don't like it  :) I mean, at least YOLO, lol, cray-cray etc aren't already other word(s) that mean something else entirely.
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BabylonSister

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Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
« Reply #394 on: January 23, 2013, 07:41:03 PM »


Essentially any unnecessary shortening of words and/or deliberate misspellings, like "imma" instead of "I'm going to". Why? WHY DOES THIS HAPPEN?




"Imma" is not a misspelling; it's a transcription of the way it's pronounced, like "gonna" or "wanna".

I thing that's fairly generous. I mean it misses the entire middle word and then ends up sounding like something else very common. The first time my daughter played the Gosh-awful song "Imma be" in my presence I really heard "I'm a bee" for the first bit until they started including other lyrics. The *first* time I heard it was Kanye and his infamous awards interruption and I honestly thought that he was just accidentally missing a whole word out of his sentence. Given how clearly he was on *something* I just kept on thinking that until I heard it somewhere else.

I mean, if you say "gunna" with a broad enough Australian accent it sounds like "gunner", but I don't think those are two really easily confused words. I understand language evolves, and I understand urban groups often want their own private language, I just don't have to be happy about it  :)

I think she's spot on, actually.  "I'm going to" changed to "I'm gunna" to "I'mma", just shortening each time.

Oh, I wasn't disagreeing with the theory, I was just having my little middle-aged tantrum because I don't like it  :) I mean, at least YOLO, lol, cray-cray etc aren't already other word(s) that mean something else entirely.


It's very sloppy pronunciation, for sure.  I'm trying to imagine someone who is learning English as a second language and has to decipher "Imma" as "I'm going to/gonna" and "Ahnunno" as "I don't know."

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Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
« Reply #395 on: January 25, 2013, 09:50:43 AM »
I recall in the excellent series "The Story of English" a discussion of how pronunciation and word usage change in a given population over time. So, the development of "Imma" in place of "I am going to," or even "I'm gonna" is a natural phenomenon. It's one reason why we now have so many different languages.

The problem with a worldwide language such as English, of course, is that at some point, different forms of "English" may develop until they become mutually unintelligible.There are some interesting sociopolitical issues about whether those forms should be considered variants from "standard" English, or treated as different languages.
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SpottedPony

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Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
« Reply #396 on: January 25, 2013, 11:13:40 AM »
A couple more that annoy me that I wish would go away.  Making it real or it's getting real.  Also B-itches like or B-itch Please. 

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Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
« Reply #397 on: January 25, 2013, 11:56:33 AM »
Making it real or it's getting real. 

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I know that this has been around for awhile, but I despise the modern use of the word "real" and "fake."  Whenever I hear, "She's so fake!  She only thinks about clothes and boys!" I automatically think, "But boys and clothes aren't made up, are they?"

Not to mention the fact that I keep hearing people use "real" to excuse their rude/bratty/nasty behavior.  I think kindness is just as real.

twiggy

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Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
« Reply #398 on: January 25, 2013, 12:32:58 PM »
I'm getting tired of seeing people use "littles" to mean children. I just saw a FB update "takin the littles to the park"
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CreteGirl

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Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
« Reply #399 on: January 25, 2013, 01:01:23 PM »
"Rocking" used to mean "wearing".  As in she was rocking (or rockin') a new sweater.

SciFiLeslie

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Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
« Reply #400 on: January 25, 2013, 03:22:25 PM »
Surprised not to see these after 27 pages (unless I missed them)

"Can I haz..." or "I haz..."

"So many feels."

bansidhe

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Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
« Reply #401 on: January 25, 2013, 07:11:18 PM »
Surprised not to see these after 27 pages (unless I missed them)

"Can I haz..." or "I haz..."

"So many feels."

I'm good with the first one because of the cat connection, though I prefer "I can haz."  :D

What on earth is "So many feels" supposed to express, though? I haven't run into that one before. Is it something along the lines of "So many emotions"?
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violinp

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Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
« Reply #402 on: January 25, 2013, 08:14:53 PM »
Surprised not to see these after 27 pages (unless I missed them)

"Can I haz..." or "I haz..."

"So many feels."

I'm good with the first one because of the cat connection, though I prefer "I can haz."  :D

What on earth is "So many feels" supposed to express, though? I haven't run into that one before. Is it something along the lines of "So many emotions"?

Feels = feelings or emotions, usually sad or bittersweet. It's usually used in the context of "That episode of Game of Thrones gave me so many feels."
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Diane AKA Traska

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Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
« Reply #403 on: January 25, 2013, 10:45:09 PM »
Surprised not to see these after 27 pages (unless I missed them)

"Can I haz..." or "I haz..."

"So many feels."

I'm good with the first one because of the cat connection, though I prefer "I can haz."  :D

What on earth is "So many feels" supposed to express, though? I haven't run into that one before. Is it something along the lines of "So many emotions"?

Feels = feelings or emotions, usually sad or bittersweet. It's usually used in the context of "That episode of Game of Thrones gave me so many feels."

I *think* it cam from Imgur, but I can't be positive.
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Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
« Reply #404 on: January 25, 2013, 11:23:25 PM »
Surprised not to see these after 27 pages (unless I missed them)

"Can I haz..." or "I haz..."

"So many feels."

I'm good with the first one because of the cat connection, though I prefer "I can haz."  :D

What on earth is "So many feels" supposed to express, though? I haven't run into that one before. Is it something along the lines of "So many emotions"?

Feels = feelings or emotions, usually sad or bittersweet. It's usually used in the context of "That episode of Game of Thrones gave me so many feels."

Yea, that really isn't the image that phrase invokes, though...
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