Author Topic: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing  (Read 53931 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Twik

  • A Pillar of the Forum
  • *****
  • Posts: 28519
Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
« Reply #465 on: February 13, 2013, 04:16:25 PM »
Well, if I painted five paintings from scratch, could I not say I had five unique paintings, if each one was different from any other painting out there?
My cousin's memoir of love and loneliness while raising a child with multiple disabilities will be out on Amazon soon! Know the Night, by Maria Mutch, has been called "full of hope, light, and companionship for surviving the small hours of the night."

Diane AKA Traska

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 4538
  • Or you can just call me Diane. (NE USA EHellion)
Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
« Reply #466 on: February 13, 2013, 04:24:09 PM »
Well, if I painted five paintings from scratch, could I not say I had five unique paintings, if each one was different from any other painting out there?

Yes, but your painting wouldn't be more unique than any other painting (assuming said painting was also unique).  Unique is a binary state, it either is or is not.  I think Seraphia meant "more unique" like "more flavorful" or "more worrisome", rather than "more toys" or "more cookies".

In any event, I don't WANT something that tastes unique.  We've discovered most of the really good flavors by now.  Something that tastes unique is going to be, like, garlic and pork infused bananas.
Location:
Philadelphia, PA

Slartibartfast

  • Super Hero!
  • ****
  • Posts: 11721
    • Nerdy Necklaces - my Etsy shop!
Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
« Reply #467 on: February 13, 2013, 07:17:09 PM »
Having something that's "a little unique" whatever is like being "a little pregnant."  We do use both as a shorthand for other characteristics, but they're either true or they're not.  (Someone who is "very pregnant" may be showing more than someone who is "a little pregnant," but they're both equally pregnant.)

Katana_Geldar

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 1812
Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
« Reply #468 on: February 13, 2013, 07:25:07 PM »
What do people mean by 'fall pregnant'?  What did you do? Fall over a man on the road?

afbluebelle

  • Super Hero!
  • ****
  • Posts: 5361
  • Saving the world one squirrelbot at a time
Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
« Reply #469 on: February 13, 2013, 10:19:42 PM »
What do people mean by 'fall pregnant'?  What did you do? Fall over a man on the road?

I'll be quoting Eminem for a week because of that statement ;D
My inner (r-word) is having a field day with this one.
-Love is Evol: Christopher Titus-

Mental Magpie

  • Super Hero!
  • ****
  • Posts: 5316
  • ...for the dark side looks back.
Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
« Reply #470 on: February 13, 2013, 10:28:43 PM »
What do people mean by 'fall pregnant'?  What did you do? Fall over a man on the road?

I'll be quoting Eminem for a week because of that statement ;D

Haha!  I actually quoted that to the Eagle upon reading Katana_Geldar's question...he just looked at me, clueless.
The problem with choosing the lesser of two evils is that you're still choosing evil.

Yvaine

  • Super Hero!
  • ****
  • Posts: 8895
Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
« Reply #471 on: February 13, 2013, 10:41:11 PM »
u·nique
[yoo-neek]
adjective
1.existing as the only one or as the sole example; single; solitary in type or characteristics: a unique copy of an ancient manuscript.
2.having no like or equal; unparalleled; incomparable: Bach was unique in his handling of counterpoint.
3.limited in occurrence to a given class, situation, or area: a species unique to Australia.
4.limited to a single outcome or result; without alternative possibilities: Certain types of problems have unique solutions.
5.not typical; unusual: She has a very unique smile.

Unique does not mean "Come to our store where you and 5 billion other people can buy the same exact unique item."  It's over-used in ads, newscasts, and printed media.




A friend of mine used to say "It's the most unique thing I have ever seen!"

Our other friend, the grammar cop, finally said "Is it more unique than the most unique thing you saw LAST week?"

Most unique is like absolutely final.  Both words are definitive... they can't be modified.

Thank you! This is one of mine too. "Our cupcakes will have more unique flavors than..." NO THEY WON'T. They can have unusual, rare, uncommon, special, different, surprising flavors. But they do not, will not, and cannot have, more unique flavors, because unique has no gradations.

Are you sure they don't mean "a larger quantity of unique flavors"--as in, they have 6 unique flavors while the other place only has 5--rather than that any specific flavor is "uniquer" than any other flavor?

Sharnita

  • Super Hero!
  • ****
  • Posts: 21459
Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
« Reply #472 on: February 13, 2013, 11:47:02 PM »
For me it's "person of interest." Everytime I hear it I know what the cops are really trying to say: "We have no clues and no suspects, but if we admit it we look like idiots. So we use this term to fool the public into thinking we're actually making headway when we actually are just treading water."

I think of  Richard Jewel and Stephen Hatfill everytime I hear this ridiculous phrase...

I assume it means "we have a sort-of suspect, but we won't call him that, in case we're wrong, and he sues us."

Twik, that is what it means to me, too

Seraphia

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 1766
  • Unabashed cat person
Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
« Reply #473 on: February 14, 2013, 12:15:37 PM »
u·nique
[yoo-neek]
adjective
1.existing as the only one or as the sole example; single; solitary in type or characteristics: a unique copy of an ancient manuscript.
2.having no like or equal; unparalleled; incomparable: Bach was unique in his handling of counterpoint.
3.limited in occurrence to a given class, situation, or area: a species unique to Australia.
4.limited to a single outcome or result; without alternative possibilities: Certain types of problems have unique solutions.
5.not typical; unusual: She has a very unique smile.

Unique does not mean "Come to our store where you and 5 billion other people can buy the same exact unique item."  It's over-used in ads, newscasts, and printed media.




A friend of mine used to say "It's the most unique thing I have ever seen!"

Our other friend, the grammar cop, finally said "Is it more unique than the most unique thing you saw LAST week?"

Most unique is like absolutely final.  Both words are definitive... they can't be modified.

Thank you! This is one of mine too. "Our cupcakes will have more unique flavors than..." NO THEY WON'T. They can have unusual, rare, uncommon, special, different, surprising flavors. But they do not, will not, and cannot have, more unique flavors, because unique has no gradations.

Are you sure they don't mean "a larger quantity of unique flavors"--as in, they have 6 unique flavors while the other place only has 5--rather than that any specific flavor is "uniquer" than any other flavor?

Sorry, I should have continued my example sentence. When 'more' is being used as its own adjective, (e.g. "we have more food") that's fine. But trying to say something is "more unique" than something else, or claiming that a thing is "the most unique" of the things, that's what makes me a little grouchy.
Ancora Imparo - I am still learning

BeagleMommy

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 3131
Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
« Reply #474 on: February 14, 2013, 12:49:33 PM »
u·nique
[yoo-neek]
adjective
1.existing as the only one or as the sole example; single; solitary in type or characteristics: a unique copy of an ancient manuscript.
2.having no like or equal; unparalleled; incomparable: Bach was unique in his handling of counterpoint.
3.limited in occurrence to a given class, situation, or area: a species unique to Australia.
4.limited to a single outcome or result; without alternative possibilities: Certain types of problems have unique solutions.
5.not typical; unusual: She has a very unique smile.

Unique does not mean "Come to our store where you and 5 billion other people can buy the same exact unique item."  It's over-used in ads, newscasts, and printed media.




A friend of mine used to say "It's the most unique thing I have ever seen!"

Our other friend, the grammar cop, finally said "Is it more unique than the most unique thing you saw LAST week?"

Most unique is like absolutely final.  Both words are definitive... they can't be modified.

Thank you! This is one of mine too. "Our cupcakes will have more unique flavors than..." NO THEY WON'T. They can have unusual, rare, uncommon, special, different, surprising flavors. But they do not, will not, and cannot have, more unique flavors, because unique has no gradations. The phrasing is further undermined to a teeth-gritting degree when the "unique" flavor is something like salted caramel or mocha strawberry, which maybe not everybody has come up with, but certainly more than one individual has.

DH just rolls his eyes now when I start shouting "Non-modifiable adjective!" at the television. I think he's finally gotten used to me arguing with cooking shows.

Thank you, x1000000000!  Would you mind terribly if I start yelling "Non-modifiable adjective" as well?  I was watching a local program where a chef described his dish as having the "most unique" flavor.  What did he make?  Fetuccini with shrimp.  Grrrrr!

Ms_Cellany

  • The Queen of Squee
  • Super Hero!
  • ****
  • Posts: 5774
  • Big white goggie? No. Hasn't seen him.
Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
« Reply #475 on: February 14, 2013, 01:32:39 PM »
Professional writer here:

I'm fine with "more unique" or "very unique."  Think of a line of vases, each different in some way: one is an irregular shape, one has spectacular colors, one is sleek and made of metal, etc.  Then, at the end, is a vase made of cheesecloth cast in resin, with embedded chocolate dragons, and wooden feed hand-carved in the shape of Mickey Mouse gloves, painted in stripes.

Each vase is unique, but that one is really unique.

"Mass exodus," OTOH, just irks me.
Current fosters: Boojum (F, adult);  Rooney, Rascal, Rocket (M)

Diane AKA Traska

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 4538
  • Or you can just call me Diane. (NE USA EHellion)
Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
« Reply #476 on: February 14, 2013, 01:49:20 PM »
Professional writer here:

I'm fine with "more unique" or "very unique."  Think of a line of vases, each different in some way: one is an irregular shape, one has spectacular colors, one is sleek and made of metal, etc.  Then, at the end, is a vase made of cheesecloth cast in resin, with embedded chocolate dragons, and wooden feed hand-carved in the shape of Mickey Mouse gloves, painted in stripes.

Each vase is unique, but that one is really unique.

"Mass exodus," OTOH, just irks me.

Sorry, still no.  If there's only one of something in all the universe, it can't be more only of is something in all the universe than something else.  It can be more peculiar, more differing, more interesting, even more artistic, but it can't be more unique.  It *can*, however, be unique i more ways than something else.
Location:
Philadelphia, PA

Betelnut

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 3741
Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
« Reply #477 on: February 14, 2013, 02:51:25 PM »
"Jump the shark"

It just seems to be used when a TV show, movie or whatever irritates you rather than when it have an episode of sheer ridiculousness.  Being irritated with a show is not the same as a show doing something that totally destroys its integrity.

"The show totally jumped the shark when it had Colleen eat a doughnut!  I mean, she would never do that!"
Native Texan, Marylander currently

MrTango

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 2345
Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
« Reply #478 on: February 14, 2013, 02:57:08 PM »
"Jump the shark"

It just seems to be used when a TV show, movie or whatever irritates you rather than when it have an episode of sheer ridiculousness.  Being irritated with a show is not the same as a show doing something that totally destroys its integrity.

"The show totally jumped the shark when it had Colleen eat a doughnut!  I mean, she would never do that!"

The phrase is actually a reference to an episode of the show Happy Days, wherein the Fonz is water-skiing and ends up having to literally jump over a shark.  Of course, the more ridiculous part of that scene is that he's still wearing his leather jacket while water skiing...

A variant on that is "Nuke the Fridge," referencing the scene in the 4th Indiana Jones movie in which Harrison Ford climbs into a lead-lined refrigerator to survive a nuclear blast.
« Last Edit: February 14, 2013, 03:03:16 PM by MrTango »

Betelnut

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 3741
Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
« Reply #479 on: February 14, 2013, 03:38:56 PM »
"Jump the shark"

It just seems to be used when a TV show, movie or whatever irritates you rather than when it have an episode of sheer ridiculousness.  Being irritated with a show is not the same as a show doing something that totally destroys its integrity.

"The show totally jumped the shark when it had Colleen eat a doughnut!  I mean, she would never do that!"

The phrase is actually a reference to an episode of the show Happy Days, wherein the Fonz is water-skiing and ends up having to literally jump over a shark.  Of course, the more ridiculous part of that scene is that he's still wearing his leather jacket while water skiing...

A variant on that is "Nuke the Fridge," referencing the scene in the 4th Indiana Jones movie in which Harrison Ford climbs into a lead-lined refrigerator to survive a nuclear blast.

I know where the phrase comes from.  I just don't like it being used just because someone doesn't like a plot twist.  It is used too often.
Native Texan, Marylander currently