Author Topic: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing  (Read 57332 times)

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diesel_darlin

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Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
« Reply #540 on: March 06, 2013, 10:16:55 PM »
When someone want you to do something for them. Instead of asking "will you please", "do you mind doing xxxx", they say "do you wanna pick this up/ dump this/ carry this/whatever."

No, I dont wanna.  >:(

jaxsue

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Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
« Reply #541 on: March 07, 2013, 08:09:11 AM »
I hear "sprinkle" and I admit, I think of something that's done in the bathroom that, depending on gender, one can do sitting down or standing up.  Which makes the idea of a "sprinkle" as a modified baby shower rather unappealing.

Exactly! When I hear that word I feel the urge to visit the bathroom.  :o

whatsanenigma

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Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
« Reply #542 on: March 07, 2013, 08:16:14 AM »

"Passed on," "passed away" or "passed over" for "died"


I find this one annoying too, but only in certain contexts.  If you are talking about someone who really did "pass away", as in, an elderly person who died peacefully in their sleep, then I am fine with it.  But when people say things like "So and So passed away in the war", or when the death was otherwise violent, as in a car crash or homicide or sucicide, referring to those kinds of deaths with the term "passed away", it is really irritating to me.

bansidhe

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Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
« Reply #543 on: March 07, 2013, 02:08:05 PM »
Wonder whether "for free", is a tiresome trendy expression (or worse) for anyone else on the board?

Yep!  It annoys me every time I see it and I've been known to shout "That's wroooong!" at commercials on TV. ;D

Don't know if this has been mentioned: sprinkle, as in mini-shower. If it quacks like a duck and walks like a duck, then it's a duck. Or, in other words, it's a shower.

I encountered that term for the first time yesterday or the day before and it was on this board. I had no clue what it meant, so thanks for explaining. And I loathe it and am with other posters in thinking it sounds like a euphemism for urination.
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violinp

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Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
« Reply #544 on: March 07, 2013, 02:20:09 PM »

"Passed on," "passed away" or "passed over" for "died"


I find this one annoying too, but only in certain contexts.  If you are talking about someone who really did "pass away", as in, an elderly person who died peacefully in their sleep, then I am fine with it.  But when people say things like "So and So passed away in the war", or when the death was otherwise violent, as in a car crash or homicide or sucicide, referring to those kinds of deaths with the term "passed away", it is really irritating to me.

What's even worse is "He/She passed." As in, "The cow got loose after Mama passed." Passed what? I infinitely prefer "passed away" to that, because it doesn't sound like the sentence got cut off.
"It takes a great deal of courage to stand up to your enemies, but even more to stand up to your friends" - Harry Potter


twiggy

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Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
« Reply #545 on: March 07, 2013, 02:20:50 PM »

"Passed on," "passed away" or "passed over" for "died"


I find this one annoying too, but only in certain contexts.  If you are talking about someone who really did "pass away", as in, an elderly person who died peacefully in their sleep, then I am fine with it.  But when people say things like "So and So passed away in the war", or when the death was otherwise violent, as in a car crash or homicide or sucicide, referring to those kinds of deaths with the term "passed away", it is really irritating to me.

I use "passed" when talking about ODS. It's less jarring in conversation than "my child died" and to me, it feels a little softer, so it's easier on me as well.
In the United States today, there is a pervasive tendency to treat children as adults, and adults as children.  The options of children are thus steadily expanded, while those of adults are progressively constricted.  The result is unruly children and childish adults.  ~Thomas Szasz

bansidhe

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Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
« Reply #546 on: March 07, 2013, 05:47:50 PM »
Along those lines, I really dislike the ubiquitous "I'm sorry for your loss." You cannot be sorry for a loss. That makes no sense. You can, however, be sorry about someone's loss or you can be sorry for someone.
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Cat-Fu

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Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
« Reply #547 on: March 08, 2013, 11:45:05 AM »
That's not really a trendy phrase, though, that's just a manner of speech.
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Venus193

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Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
« Reply #548 on: March 08, 2013, 12:05:26 PM »
I probably mentioned it upthread already but current use of the word "on" in phrases that it doesn't belong in:

"Good on you" which should be "Good for you."

"Hating on" which simply should be "hating"

Especially when the user should know better.

cabbageweevil

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Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
« Reply #549 on: March 08, 2013, 12:50:35 PM »
I probably mentioned it upthread already but current use of the word "on" in phrases that it doesn't belong in:

"Good on you" which should be "Good for you."

"Hating on" which simply should be "hating"

Especially when the user should know better.

With respect: re the former -- in my understanding, "Good on..." has been for well over a century, established Australian English as a congratulatory phrase: the way that is said there, what elsewhere is more usually expressed as "Good for...".  It may not be patrician English, but it is for sure linguistic "standard operational procedure" in that part of the world.  I'd think that Aussie participants in the forum would concur here.

DottyG

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Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
« Reply #550 on: March 08, 2013, 12:55:33 PM »
Quote
With respect: re the former -- in my understanding, "Good on..." has been for well over a century, established Australian English as a congratulatory phrase: the way that is said there, what elsewhere is more usually expressed as "Good for...".  It may not be patrician English, but it is for sure linguistic "standard operational procedure" in that part of the world.  I'd think that Aussie participants in the forum would concur here.

And, equally with respect, many of the other phrases and words mentioned in this thread are "established" and "standard operational procedure" in various areas as well.  I've seen quite a few that, while may not be favored in some parts of the US or world, are absolutely correct in my area.  And I'm assuming that's true of ones that irk me as well.

MariaE

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Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
« Reply #551 on: March 08, 2013, 12:55:51 PM »
I probably mentioned it upthread already but current use of the word "on" in phrases that it doesn't belong in:

"Good on you" which should be "Good for you."

"Hating on" which simply should be "hating"

Especially when the user should know better.

With respect: re the former -- in my understanding, "Good on..." has been for well over a century, established Australian English as a congratulatory phrase: the way that is said there, what elsewhere is more usually expressed as "Good for...".  It may not be patrician English, but it is for sure linguistic "standard operational procedure" in that part of the world.  I'd think that Aussie participants in the forum would concur here.

This Kiwi participant certainly does :). Thanks, I was trying to figure out how to phrase it myself.
 
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twiggy

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Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
« Reply #552 on: March 08, 2013, 01:55:01 PM »
"Suck it up Buttercup"

and

"time to put on your big girl panties and . . . "

Both sound dismissive and condescending IMO
In the United States today, there is a pervasive tendency to treat children as adults, and adults as children.  The options of children are thus steadily expanded, while those of adults are progressively constricted.  The result is unruly children and childish adults.  ~Thomas Szasz

Moray

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Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
« Reply #553 on: March 08, 2013, 01:57:13 PM »
"Suck it up Buttercup"

and

"time to put on your big girl panties and . . . "

Both sound dismissive and condescending IMO

To be fair, that's kind of the point of those phrases :)
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Chonsil

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Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
« Reply #554 on: March 08, 2013, 06:21:51 PM »
Only been through half the pages....
Mine are:
My bad.
Bling.
And "slap" for "makeup". As in "Let's go get some slap on." Ugh.
And the current expression "That made me vomit in my mouth." Just yuck.