Author Topic: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing  (Read 58825 times)

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Ms_Cellany

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Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
« Reply #555 on: March 08, 2013, 06:23:54 PM »
"slap" for "makeup". As in "Let's go get some slap on." Ugh.

Huhn. I'd only heard that term as a 19th century circus term for clown makeup. Kinda cool that it smoldered underground for so long and re-emerged into the main culture.
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DottyG

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Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
« Reply #556 on: March 08, 2013, 06:28:32 PM »
Some of these terms are already gone where I am, but some people are calling them a "new trend" where they are.  These things must go in waves across the world or something.

For instance, the "vomit in my mouth" was a saying here years ago.  I haven't heard someone say that in ages.  It's sure not "trendy."  However, a recent poster called it a "current expression."

Chonsil

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Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
« Reply #557 on: March 08, 2013, 08:06:04 PM »
Some of these terms are already gone where I am, but some people are calling them a "new trend" where they are.  These things must go in waves across the world or something.

For instance, the "vomit in my mouth" was a saying here years ago.  I haven't heard someone say that in ages.  It's sure not "trendy."  However, a recent poster called it a "current expression."

Well, I am in the UK, but actually, no, I'd say it's more of an indicator of how out of the loop I am with what's trendy ( :)). I've only recently come across the vomit expression being used in Facebook comments from people - who are based in the States. But then, maybe that's why I notice it, because I've never heard it used over here. But then again, the last time I was out and about in a "trendy" social setting was a good four years ago!

DottyG

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Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
« Reply #558 on: March 08, 2013, 08:26:34 PM »
Quote
I've only recently come across the vomit expression being used in Facebook comments from people - who are based in the States.

It could be that it's a "new" saying to the FB people you're reading.  Maybe the wave isn't across the world but even more local.  Maybe it's just now hitting other parts of the US?


TaurusGirl

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Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
« Reply #559 on: March 08, 2013, 09:02:03 PM »
One that several of my friends (who are educated and know better!) keep using the "getting my hair did".

No. You are getting your hair DONE.

 >:(

Piratelvr1121

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Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
« Reply #560 on: March 08, 2013, 09:25:33 PM »
One that several of my friends (who are educated and know better!) keep using the "getting my hair did".

No. You are getting your hair DONE.

 >:(

Ugh, that bugs me too!
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Mental Magpie

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Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
« Reply #561 on: March 08, 2013, 09:26:22 PM »
One that several of my friends (who are educated and know better!) keep using the "getting my hair did".

No. You are getting your hair DONE.

 >:(

Are you sure they're not making fun of that saying?  I find with people who should know better do these things to poke fun at people who actually same them.
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cabbageweevil

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Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
« Reply #562 on: March 09, 2013, 02:31:26 AM »
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With respect: re the former -- in my understanding, "Good on..." has been for well over a century, established Australian English as a congratulatory phrase: the way that is said there, what elsewhere is more usually expressed as "Good for...".  It may not be patrician English, but it is for sure linguistic "standard operational procedure" in that part of the world.  I'd think that Aussie participants in the forum would concur here.

And, equally with respect, many of the other phrases and words mentioned in this thread are "established" and "standard operational procedure" in various areas as well.  I've seen quite a few that, while may not be favored in some parts of the US or world, are absolutely correct in my area.  And I'm assuming that's true of ones that irk me as well.

I'll use the word "Antipodean" -- I'm in the UK, so Australia and New Zealand are our geographical antipodes.  The crux of the thing for me is, that (as touched on in more recent posts), "trendy" expressions, for most of us, imply spoken or written stuff which has shown up only recently. For most of my 64 years of life, I've been aware of "Good on..." as an Antipodean congratulatory expression (and to me personally, rather a nice one); so to me, very far from new. It so happens that I'm not annoyed by the expression itself, or by its being borrowed by other peoples. Of course, everyone is free to find any form of words, irritating !

(MariaE, thanks for confirmation from the Antipodes.)

veronaz

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Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
« Reply #563 on: June 05, 2013, 09:41:28 PM »

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baglady

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Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
« Reply #564 on: June 05, 2013, 10:37:03 PM »
I'm in the U.S. and have been in love with "good on" since the first time I heard it. I occasionally slip it into my writing to avoid the double "for" ("good on you for doing ___" instead of "good for you for doing ___") because the latter feels clunky to me.

There aren't any "trendy" expressions I'm tired of, because by the time they get to my 54-year-old ears they aren't trendy anymore! Some will go out of style ("Groovy!") and some will stick around ("No way!"). I will continue to use the language I'm comfortable with, just as I wear the clothes I'm comfortable with, despite fashion trends.  ;)
« Last Edit: June 05, 2013, 11:37:26 PM by baglady »
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twoferrets

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Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
« Reply #565 on: June 06, 2013, 09:52:50 AM »
When people start a reply (online-- this doesn't really strike me the same in actual conversations) with "Um...".  It implies (to me, at least!) that the writer is about to get very smug.  As if it's shorthand for "here's something very obvious that you didn't know."

Use of the term "sat down with" instead of "spoke to" or "interviewed" by journalists.

The term "on trend."  And "kiddos" instead of kids or children.  And "hubby" but I think I may have already said that pages ago.

veronaz

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Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
« Reply #566 on: June 06, 2013, 10:07:10 AM »
Quote
When people start a reply (online-- this doesn't really strike me the same in actual conversations) with "Um...".  It implies (to me, at least!) that the writer is about to get very smug.  As if it's shorthand for "here's something very obvious that you didn't know."

Definitely.

As an online reply/remark “ummm” is almost always sarcastic and smug.

IRL “ummm” can simply mean the person is thinking.  It can be sarcasm and smugness, but not always.

magicdomino

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Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
« Reply #567 on: June 06, 2013, 11:01:47 AM »
Quote
When people start a reply (online-- this doesn't really strike me the same in actual conversations) with "Um...".  It implies (to me, at least!) that the writer is about to get very smug.  As if it's shorthand for "here's something very obvious that you didn't know."

Definitely.

As an online reply/remark “ummm” is almost always sarcastic and smug.

IRL “ummm” can simply mean the person is thinking.  It can be sarcasm and smugness, but not always.

Interesting.  When I've used "um" on email, posts, etc, I meant the opposite of smug.  I use "um" the same way that I use it in real life:  a way of indicating that I'm not absolutely confident that what I'm about to say is correct.  "Um . . . I may be confused about this."

Allyson

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Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
« Reply #568 on: June 06, 2013, 03:49:28 PM »
"Um" reads as snooty to me, too. I suspect it's one of those not inherently 'bad' ones that has been used that way so often it reads that way. For instance, "Um, maybe you didn't read my post, but not everyone likes weasels." But, generally the rest of the content will show whether or not it's a 'snooty' um or a conversational one.

dawnfire

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Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
« Reply #569 on: June 06, 2013, 08:05:57 PM »
My boo as referring to one's significant other. Especially when written!


It took me some time to figure out what that meant!!


I also hate "Meh" when someone else can't effectively communicate feelings by using actual words!!!!!

second me on meh, for  while it seemed it was all that came out of my older (he was a teen at the time) son's mouth