Author Topic: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing  (Read 55308 times)

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holly firestorm

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Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
« Reply #570 on: June 06, 2013, 08:28:16 PM »
One that several of my friends (who are educated and know better!) keep using the "getting my hair did".

No. You are getting your hair DONE.

 >:(

Ugh, that bugs me too!
I likes me some... is similar.

Also, I still hear the vomit in my mouth expression now and again.

Diane AKA Traska

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Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
« Reply #571 on: June 06, 2013, 11:40:56 PM »
My boo as referring to one's significant other. Especially when written!


It took me some time to figure out what that meant!!


I also hate "Meh" when someone else can't effectively communicate feelings by using actual words!!!!!

second me on meh, for  while it seemed it was all that came out of my older (he was a teen at the time) son's mouth

For me, "meh" sometimes IS the articulation.  The translation is:  I am so ambivalent about this that I can't even be bothered to find the words to describe the depths of my ambivalence.   
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Awestruck Shmuck

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Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
« Reply #572 on: June 07, 2013, 12:23:30 AM »
With respect: re the former -- in my understanding, "Good on..." has been for well over a century, established Australian English as a congratulatory phrase: the way that is said there, what elsewhere is more usually expressed as "Good for...".  It may not be patrician English, but it is for sure linguistic "standard operational procedure" in that part of the world.  I'd think that Aussie participants in the forum would concur here.

Agreed. I do occasionally cringe inwardly at the state of grammar/word choice in my circles, the exclamation 'goodonya!!' is perfectly logical, reasonable and useful in my mind! I say it even more to two of my dearest friends who are English Public School educated, and enjoy watching them flinch at just how Aussie it sounds!

I found in the Australian 'dialect' (Is it a dialect? I suppose...) anyway, 'good for you' is almost always sarcastic, eg:

Me: I totally nailed my exam yesterday, did much better than I was expecting!

Alternate possible responses:

Brother: Goodonya!! (genuinely pleased for me)
Classmate: Good for you *implied snark* (perhaps didn't do so well)

MariaE

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Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
« Reply #573 on: June 07, 2013, 02:25:14 AM »
With respect: re the former -- in my understanding, "Good on..." has been for well over a century, established Australian English as a congratulatory phrase: the way that is said there, what elsewhere is more usually expressed as "Good for...".  It may not be patrician English, but it is for sure linguistic "standard operational procedure" in that part of the world.  I'd think that Aussie participants in the forum would concur here.

Agreed. I do occasionally cringe inwardly at the state of grammar/word choice in my circles, the exclamation 'goodonya!!' is perfectly logical, reasonable and useful in my mind! I say it even more to two of my dearest friends who are English Public School educated, and enjoy watching them flinch at just how Aussie it sounds!

I found in the Australian 'dialect' (Is it a dialect? I suppose...) anyway, 'good for you' is almost always sarcastic, eg:

Me: I totally nailed my exam yesterday, did much better than I was expecting!

Alternate possible responses:

Brother: Goodonya!! (genuinely pleased for me)
Classmate: Good for you *implied snark* (perhaps didn't do so well)

Thank you!!! I was trying to figure out what bugged me about "Good for you" and you nailed it exactly. So let's just say that the same thing goes for the New Zealand 'dialect'.
 
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crella

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Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
« Reply #574 on: June 07, 2013, 03:26:51 AM »
When people start a reply (online-- this doesn't really strike me the same in actual conversations) with "Um...".  It implies (to me, at least!) that the writer is about to get very smug.  As if it's shorthand for "here's something very obvious that you didn't know."


Yes, I agree. It's a turn-off.

Venus193

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Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
« Reply #575 on: June 07, 2013, 06:39:23 AM »
I am misquoted above; it was cabbageweevil who attributed "good on" to Australian usage.

scotcat60

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Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
« Reply #576 on: June 07, 2013, 07:10:12 AM »
The one with Ingrid Bergman is always good.

Curiously I have never seen that version of "Gaslight". i have seen the Anton Walbrook/Diana Wynyard verison several times, and enjoy it.

I am tired of hearing"What do we got?" rather than "What have we got".

TootsNYC

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Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
« Reply #577 on: June 07, 2013, 11:33:42 AM »
Boy, am I old.  About ninety percent of the expressions posted in this thread are complete mysteries to me; never heard them, and don't really want to do so.

My hot button?  "Hating on".  "Hate" is a verb.  One doesn't "love on", "like on", "want on" or any such thing, so why this prevalence of "hate on"?  To me, it just smacks of a complete lack of creativity.  Surely there are so many more ways to convey this point!

End of sermon.

Actually, one does. And I think it IS creative, actually. It's taking the word and stretching into a new usage--isn't that what creativity often entails.

It might seem GRACELESS to someone.

(when ones "loves on" one's kitty, one is actively engaging in activites that express love--one is smooching her, petting her, snuggling her. When one is "hating on" someone, one is not just *feeling* negative emotions but is going out of their way to EXPRESS their animosity and disapproval. It's actually very specific and USEFUL)

Judah

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Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
« Reply #578 on: June 07, 2013, 11:41:04 AM »
My boo as referring to one's significant other. Especially when written!


It took me some time to figure out what that meant!!


I also hate "Meh" when someone else can't effectively communicate feelings by using actual words!!!!!

second me on meh, for  while it seemed it was all that came out of my older (he was a teen at the time) son's mouth

For me, "meh" sometimes IS the articulation.  The translation is:  I am so ambivalent about this that I can't even be bothered to find the words to describe the depths of my ambivalence.

Exactly! That's a perfect translation, Diane.
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Strong hints don't work.
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Betelnut

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Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
« Reply #579 on: June 07, 2013, 11:50:44 AM »
Boy, am I old.  About ninety percent of the expressions posted in this thread are complete mysteries to me; never heard them, and don't really want to do so.

My hot button?  "Hating on".  "Hate" is a verb.  One doesn't "love on", "like on", "want on" or any such thing, so why this prevalence of "hate on"?  To me, it just smacks of a complete lack of creativity.  Surely there are so many more ways to convey this point!

End of sermon.

Actually, one does. And I think it IS creative, actually. It's taking the word and stretching into a new usage--isn't that what creativity often entails.

It might seem GRACELESS to someone.

(when ones "loves on" one's kitty, one is actively engaging in activites that express love--one is smooching her, petting her, snuggling her. When one is "hating on" someone, one is not just *feeling* negative emotions but is going out of their way to EXPRESS their animosity and disapproval. It's actually very specific and USEFUL)

Good description of "loves on" and "hating on" Toots!
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HockeyNut

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Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
« Reply #580 on: June 07, 2013, 01:48:16 PM »
The term "childfree" drives me up the wall.  For me, it conjurs up images of a child being some sort of parasite to be avoided.


So what to you would be an acceptable term to describe someone who doesn't want children?

I fought with doctors from ages 16 to 31 to get sterilized because I never wanted
kids.  Childless to me means I don't have something I wanted.  Childfree means
I don't have something I never wanted.  From reading childfree blogs & forums it seems most childfree people feel that way.

So yes, for me & I'm sure many other childfree people birthing children is something to be avoided.   

Bijou

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Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
« Reply #581 on: June 07, 2013, 02:58:22 PM »
This is from talent shows for singing and jewelry or crafting shows   "Make it your own".  Gads!  I started gritting my teeth at that expression after about the third time I heard it.

Also, "Trust me"  as in when someone says something and follows it with "Trust me."  as though they are the know it all of the universe.  We went to a book signing once by a local author who had the 'trust me' syndrome.  She gave a little lecture about her book and some stories, but what should have been interesting had me stiffening and dreadfully waiting for the next "Trust me!"  What was worse was it was contagious and after that I found myself saying it!  Boy, I broke that habit in a hurry.  :-[ :-[ :-[
I've never knitted anything I could recognize when it was finished.  Actually, I've never finished anything, much to my family's relief.

magicdomino

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Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
« Reply #582 on: June 07, 2013, 04:13:17 PM »
I never trust anyone who says, "Trust me."

cwm

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Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
« Reply #583 on: June 07, 2013, 04:26:08 PM »
I'll see you a walla and raise you one.
Wah-lah.

I hate hate HATE lol added to the end of every sentence. I have a friend who will complain about how terrible her life is and every sentence ends with lol.

"Do you want to....?"
No. I don't. And I usually answer in such a manner.

Also, I can't stand it when bosses/managers/higher-ups start with saying "We need to..." Okay, maybe I'm just being difficult here, but if you say WE, then you need to take some ownership of whatever it is you're telling everyone else to do. If "we" need to get all these bins filled with product, don't then stand by and watch as everyone else fills bins with product and you don't.

Then again, most of these I use with my friends/family, but it's all a matter of audience. I don't use a lot of these here, and if I know that someone is exceptionally bothered by something, I try to remember not to say it around them.

bansidhe

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Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
« Reply #584 on: June 07, 2013, 06:30:37 PM »
The term "childfree" drives me up the wall.  For me, it conjurs up images of a child being some sort of parasite to be avoided.


So what to you would be an acceptable term to describe someone who doesn't want children?

I fought with doctors from ages 16 to 31 to get sterilized because I never wanted
kids.  Childless to me means I don't have something I wanted.  Childfree means
I don't have something I never wanted.  From reading childfree blogs & forums it seems most childfree people feel that way.

So yes, for me & I'm sure many other childfree people birthing children is something to be avoided.

This! For me, children were definitely something to be avoided at all costs and thus I am childfree, not childless.

Unrelated:
Add me to the group that dislikes "Umm..." at the beginnings of sentences. I rarely hear it used with other than snotty intentions.

Also add me to the group that can't stand "hating on," "loving on," and - ugh - "crushing on."
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