Author Topic: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing  (Read 57788 times)

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Hollanda

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Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
« Reply #600 on: June 10, 2013, 02:21:44 AM »
"I didn't like it.  I loved it. " Simon Cowell is so predictable! 
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CreteGirl

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Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
« Reply #601 on: June 10, 2013, 06:29:39 PM »
It bugs me when people say they "reached out" to someone, when they mean they contacted them.

Midnight Kitty

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Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
« Reply #602 on: June 10, 2013, 08:28:57 PM »
I finally made it to the end and am surprised that no one else suggested "perfect storm."  I would die happy if I never heard that overused expression again.

A woman with whom I used to work used "frick" instead of the bad 4 letter word starting with "f."  She said "frickin' this" and "frick that" with annoying frequency.  I understand that she was "keeping it clean for work," but when one uses a "clean" substitution, everyone just fills in the bad word anyway.

Another woman with whom I used to work tried to get me to stop using the 4 letter word starting with "s."  Difficult for me as I work in the wastewater world where we use this word frequently.  She got me to use "sugar" at work when not actually referring to the solids in the wastewater.  I would start with "sh", she would lift an eyebrow, and I would end with "ugar" instead of "it." >:D
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HGolightly

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Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
« Reply #603 on: June 10, 2013, 08:38:43 PM »
Meh.....I had a horrible and lazy coworker that said " meh" to anything she did not like or want to do.

Piratelvr1121

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Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
« Reply #604 on: June 10, 2013, 09:35:36 PM »
Regarding childless vs. childfree.  My best friend is childfree.  She loves kids and enjoys children a great deal and got quite teary when I asked her to be godmother to my youngest. 

But she also says that she knew that she shouldn't be a mother because she didn't think she'd be a good mother and should not have children and thus she took the measures to avoid having them.
Beyond a wholesome discipline, be gentle with yourself. You are a child of the universe, no less than the trees and the stars.  You have a right to be here. Be cheerful, strive to be happy. -Desiderata

katycoo

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Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
« Reply #605 on: June 10, 2013, 09:40:03 PM »
I use almost every phrase mentioned in this thread with (mostly ironic) abandon.  And I'm comfortable with that decision.

Also I feel that if every gripe listed was removed from conversation we'd all sound like a bunch of snotty pretentious snobs.  Language conveys so much more than words.

I did have to laugh recently when I heard someone say "sike!" Man I hadn't heard that since high school, really took me back!

Oh dear.  You mean "psych".

As in, you 'psyched' the person out with a mind trick.  I wonder how many other people didn't actually get the phrase?

My annoyance - "walla" instead of "voilà". Causes headaches in the same part of the brain as repeated stupid grammar and punctuation errors.

Because it is.  Its not 'trendy'.  These people don't usually know they're wrong. 

The term "childfree" drives me up the wall.  For me, it conjurs up images of a child being some sort of parasite to be avoided.

For some people, perhaps they are?

stitchygreyanonymouse

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Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
« Reply #606 on: June 10, 2013, 09:57:31 PM »
I use almost every phrase mentioned in this thread with (mostly ironic) abandon.  And I'm comfortable with that decision.

Also I feel that if every gripe listed was removed from conversation we'd all sound like a bunch of snotty pretentious snobs.  Language conveys so much more than words.

I did have to laugh recently when I heard someone say "sike!" Man I hadn't heard that since high school, really took me back!

Oh dear.  You mean "psych".

As in, you 'psyched' the person out with a mind trick.  I wonder how many other people didn't actually get the phrase?

My annoyance - "walla" instead of "voilà". Causes headaches in the same part of the brain as repeated stupid grammar and punctuation errors.

Because it is.  Its not 'trendy'.  These people don't usually know they're wrong. 

The term "childfree" drives me up the wall.  For me, it conjurs up images of a child being some sort of parasite to be avoided.

For some people, perhaps they are?

I’m not sure what tone you intended, but your wording in this post made you sound like a snotty pretentious snob (to use your phrase). Especially to Piratelvr. 'Sike' is an accepted alternate spelling for 'psych'—I dare say even preferred, since 'sike' usually connotes a different thing than trying to 'psych' someone out.


katycoo

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Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
« Reply #607 on: June 10, 2013, 10:22:01 PM »
I use almost every phrase mentioned in this thread with (mostly ironic) abandon.  And I'm comfortable with that decision.

Also I feel that if every gripe listed was removed from conversation we'd all sound like a bunch of snotty pretentious snobs.  Language conveys so much more than words.

I did have to laugh recently when I heard someone say "sike!" Man I hadn't heard that since high school, really took me back!

Oh dear.  You mean "psych".

As in, you 'psyched' the person out with a mind trick.  I wonder how many other people didn't actually get the phrase?

My annoyance - "walla" instead of "voilà". Causes headaches in the same part of the brain as repeated stupid grammar and punctuation errors.

Because it is.  Its not 'trendy'.  These people don't usually know they're wrong. 

The term "childfree" drives me up the wall.  For me, it conjurs up images of a child being some sort of parasite to be avoided.

For some people, perhaps they are?

I’m not sure what tone you intended, but your wording in this post made you sound like a snotty pretentious snob (to use your phrase). Especially to Piratelvr. 'Sike' is an accepted alternate spelling for 'psych'—I dare say even preferred, since 'sike' usually connotes a different thing than trying to 'psych' someone out.

Yes, lack of tone can have that effect.

In any event, colour me educated.  I have never seen 'sike' (in the referred context or otherwise) and assumed it a misheard word.

Diane AKA Traska

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Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
« Reply #608 on: June 10, 2013, 10:33:35 PM »
As a teen of the late 80s/early 90s, I can confirm the "sike" comment.
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Hillia

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Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
« Reply #609 on: June 10, 2013, 11:39:41 PM »
I don't know if anyone else would consider this one trendy, but I have noticed more and more people around me using it lately: "needs <past tense verb>".  E.g. "The sink needs fixed" or "The dog needs fed."  No.  "The sink needs to be fixed" or perhaps "The sink needs fixing."

I don't think this is trendy so much as a regional grammatical quirk.  My dh and his family are from rural New Mexico, and they all say it.  I think I've seen some ehellions use it also.  It's like saying 'i'm going to the store,do you want to go with?',which is often used by people who come from a German-speaking background, even if they themselves never spoke German.

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Piratelvr1121

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Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
« Reply #610 on: June 11, 2013, 08:18:02 AM »
As a teen of the late 80s/early 90s, I can confirm the "sike" comment.

As I remember it, sike was pretty much a synonym for "Just kidding!" Or "Gotcha!"
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Betelnut

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Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
« Reply #611 on: June 11, 2013, 08:49:13 AM »
I've never seen "psych" spelled as "sike."  Having just googled it, I guess it is but it seems to lose its meaning when spelled like that as "psych" indicates its original derivation.
« Last Edit: June 11, 2013, 08:50:59 AM by Betelnut »
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cwm

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Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
« Reply #612 on: June 11, 2013, 09:47:21 AM »
I don't know if anyone else would consider this one trendy, but I have noticed more and more people around me using it lately: "needs <past tense verb>".  E.g. "The sink needs fixed" or "The dog needs fed."  No.  "The sink needs to be fixed" or perhaps "The sink needs fixing."

I don't think this is trendy so much as a regional grammatical quirk.  My dh and his family are from rural New Mexico, and they all say it.  I think I've seen some ehellions use it also.  It's like saying 'i'm going to the store,do you want to go with?',which is often used by people who come from a German-speaking background, even if they themselves never spoke German.

My group of friends and I use go with like that, we're in the Midwest and the closest we have to German language is...well, one of my friend's dad is from England, which is closer to Germany than the USA? Yeah, that's all I got...

stitchygreyanonymouse

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Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
« Reply #613 on: June 11, 2013, 10:17:22 AM »
I use "go with" like that, however my family is largely of German ancestry, so I could see that being why.

Also, the Midwest has a lot of German ancestry, cwm. Cole Camp, MO is known for its German heritage, for instance. In fact, they have a lot of people still fluent in Low German there.

Mental Magpie

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Re: "Trendy" expressions you're tired of hearing
« Reply #614 on: June 11, 2013, 10:21:45 AM »
I have a strong German heritage, my grandfather being first generation American...but I also paid attention in school.  "Go with" is not a complete sentence.  I remember my neighbors doing it and how completely annoyed I was even at that young age.
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