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Well, I never knew that! Share your interesting info...

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jpcher:

--- Quote from: Kaora on January 13, 2013, 05:29:47 PM ---
--- Quote from: Bethczar on January 11, 2013, 05:17:52 PM ---
--- Quote from: camlan on January 06, 2013, 08:21:12 AM ---Random fact: One of the first recorded uses of the word "baseball" in print in English is by Jane Austen, in Northanger Abbey. Somewhere in the first chapter, Catherine, the tomboyish heroine, plays "base ball" instead of sitting nicely and sewing. (You can check this in the OED.)

Just not the author you tend to think of first in relation to sports.

--- End quote ---
Jane Austen was also one of the first to use "doorbell", although I can't remember which book it was in.

We all have unique tongue prints. I wonder who decided to research that, though.  :P

--- End quote ---

Here's one I always wanted to see done-- see if we  can figure out an estimated tongue size on our hominid ancestors and other relations, see how they compare to their luimb proportions.  Yes, I would want to do a study to see how many ancient humans could lick their elbows! :D

--- End quote ---

Okay, how many people just tried to lick their elbows?

Kimblee:

--- Quote from: jpcher on January 13, 2013, 05:36:29 PM ---
--- Quote from: Kaora on January 13, 2013, 05:29:47 PM ---
--- Quote from: Bethczar on January 11, 2013, 05:17:52 PM ---
--- Quote from: camlan on January 06, 2013, 08:21:12 AM ---Random fact: One of the first recorded uses of the word "baseball" in print in English is by Jane Austen, in Northanger Abbey. Somewhere in the first chapter, Catherine, the tomboyish heroine, plays "base ball" instead of sitting nicely and sewing. (You can check this in the OED.)

Just not the author you tend to think of first in relation to sports.

--- End quote ---
Jane Austen was also one of the first to use "doorbell", although I can't remember which book it was in.

We all have unique tongue prints. I wonder who decided to research that, though.  :P

--- End quote ---

Here's one I always wanted to see done-- see if we  can figure out an estimated tongue size on our hominid ancestors and other relations, see how they compare to their luimb proportions.  Yes, I would want to do a study to see how many ancient humans could lick their elbows! :D

--- End quote ---

Okay, how many people just tried to lick their elbows?

--- End quote ---

Me! And I failed.

I knew someone who said she could lick her elbow when she was younger. She had some condition that made her arms and legs shorter compared to the rest of her body. Before they did surgery on her arms to legthen them, she claims she could lick her elbow. I have no proof this is true, but none that its false, so there.

SamiHami:

--- Quote from: ladyknight1 on January 09, 2013, 08:51:36 AM ---
--- Quote from: RingTailedLemur on January 09, 2013, 07:38:41 AM ---
--- Quote from: Snooks on January 09, 2013, 05:58:57 AM ---
--- Quote from: ladyknight1 on January 08, 2013, 08:02:30 PM ---Cheddar cheese did not start out orange, and the orange color is added.

Beginning in the 12th century, the cheese made in the village of Cheddar was very popular and had a pale yellow color when mature due to the diet of the cows. Only the cheese made in the Cheddar region could be called by that name. Other cheesemakers noticed the success of the cheese, and began to dye their cheeses to compete with Cheddar cheese.

--- End quote ---

But cheddar cheese isn't orange  :-\

--- End quote ---

That's what I was going to say.  Ladyknight, is it possible you are thinking of Red Leicester cheese?

--- End quote ---

In the US, what is marketed as Cheddar cheese is orange, or at least a dark yellow. The white cheddar sold is the same product, without color additives.

And this is my 1000th post!

--- End quote ---

Most cheeses are made with the same basic ingredients: milk, rennet, citric acid and salt. There are a few variations, of course, but the differences in flavors/textures come about by the way the cheese is made.

All that being said, there is no such thing as orange cheese. If you see orange cheese in a store, it is definitely dyed. I become annoyed when I see the orange stuff labeled "cheddar," but the undyed cheese labeled "white cheddar."

Thipu1:
Yes, orange cheese is dyed but the dye used is usually anneto.  That's a seed used in several ethnic cuisines and it's perfectly natural so orange cheese doesn't bother me---unless it's American putty.

Moonie:

--- Quote from: Lady Snowdon on January 11, 2013, 08:34:54 PM ---One of the common signs of depression is anhedonia - the inability to feel pleasure in normally pleasurable activities.

--- End quote ---

This doesn't surprise me at all. It was one of the first things I noticed while in an abusive relationship.

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