News: IMPORTANT UPDATE REGARDING SITE IN FORUM ANNOUNCEMENT FOLDER.

  • May 21, 2018, 06:32:17 AM

Login with username, password and session length

Author Topic: Well, I never knew that! Share your interesting info...  (Read 51910 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Spring Water on Sundays

  • We will never rest, fighting the battle of who could care less.
  • Member
  • Posts: 1987
Re: Well, I never knew that! Share your interesting info...
« Reply #90 on: January 11, 2013, 11:01:13 AM »
Canola oil comes from canola seeds - duh. But what are canola seeds?

As it turns out, the canola seed is not anything that would have ever existed without the intervention of man-made science and tinkering. What happened was that some agricultural scientists were trying to develop a new cooking oil. They started out using mustard seeds, but found them to be too acidic. So, through selective breeding and various modifications to the mustard seeds, those scientists "invented" the canola seed.

In fact, "canola" isn't even a proper word - it stands for Canada Oil Low Acidity: CAN(ada) O(il) L(ow) A(cidity).

(I just learned this a couple of weeks ago)
« Last Edit: January 11, 2013, 11:03:40 AM by Spring Water on Sundays »

sunnygirl

  • Member
  • Posts: 237
Re: Well, I never knew that! Share your interesting info...
« Reply #91 on: January 11, 2013, 11:27:31 AM »
Cheddar cheese did not start out orange, and the orange color is added.

Beginning in the 12th century, the cheese made in the village of Cheddar was very popular and had a pale yellow color when mature due to the diet of the cows. Only the cheese made in the Cheddar region could be called by that name. Other cheesemakers noticed the success of the cheese, and began to dye their cheeses to compete with Cheddar cheese.

But cheddar cheese isn't orange  :-\

That's what I was going to say.  Ladyknight, is it possible you are thinking of Red Leicester cheese?

In the US, what is marketed as Cheddar cheese is orange, or at least a dark yellow. The white cheddar sold is the same product, without color additives.

And this is my 1000th post!

I find that really interesting. I've never seen American cheddar, and now I really want to try some to see if it tastes like real cheddar.

alkira6

  • Member
  • Posts: 655
Re: Well, I never knew that! Share your interesting info...
« Reply #92 on: January 11, 2013, 11:38:17 AM »
Cheddar cheese did not start out orange, and the orange color is added.

Beginning in the 12th century, the cheese made in the village of Cheddar was very popular and had a pale yellow color when mature due to the diet of the cows. Only the cheese made in the Cheddar region could be called by that name. Other cheesemakers noticed the success of the cheese, and began to dye their cheeses to compete with Cheddar cheese.

But cheddar cheese isn't orange  :-\

That's what I was going to say.  Ladyknight, is it possible you are thinking of Red Leicester cheese?

In the US, what is marketed as Cheddar cheese is orange, or at least a dark yellow. The white cheddar sold is the same product, without color additives.

And this is my 1000th post!

I find that really interesting. I've never seen American cheddar, and now I really want to try some to see if it tastes like real cheddar.

It doesn't taste the same to me. There is a more mellow/aftertaste that comes along with the colored stuff. I much prefer the white or undyed cheddar cheese.  Also, the "sharp" cheddar is actually sharp when it's undyed - the dyed cheese all tastes the same to me.

Kariachi

  • Member
  • Posts: 228
Re: Well, I never knew that! Share your interesting info...
« Reply #93 on: January 11, 2013, 11:46:56 AM »
The proper term for the lack of a sense of smell is Anosmia, and as of 2000 it affected less than 1% of Americans.

Most people with anosmia develop it following a head injury or illness, with fewer developing it due to exposure to toxins, and only 1% due through aging. This often leads to severe depression and similar mental illnesses.

Some people may develop anosmia due to nasal polyps. This cause is relatively easy to treat.

Around 2% of anosmia 'sufferers' are born with the affliction. Unlike people lacking other senses, Anosmiacs often don't realize they lack the sense until around or past puberty. Many state that they felt they would 'learn how to smell' as time went on.

NO one is quite sure as to the cause of Congenital Anosmia, but it is believed to be the result of a hereditary gene malfunction. This is supported by claims by some Anosmiacs of learning of more Anosmiacs in their families once they themselves admitted to having the affliction.

Anosmiacs sometimes use the term 'Olfies' to refer to people with a sense of smell, while the term 'Headbanger' is used to refer to other Anosmiacs that lost their sense of smell due to an accident.

Several spell-checks don't register Anosmia as a word.
"Heh. Forgive our manners, little creature that we may well kill and eat you is no excuse for rudeness."

Hmmmmm

  • Member
  • Posts: 9211
Re: Well, I never knew that! Share your interesting info...
« Reply #94 on: January 11, 2013, 11:50:24 AM »
Cheddar cheese did not start out orange, and the orange color is added.

Beginning in the 12th century, the cheese made in the village of Cheddar was very popular and had a pale yellow color when mature due to the diet of the cows. Only the cheese made in the Cheddar region could be called by that name. Other cheesemakers noticed the success of the cheese, and began to dye their cheeses to compete with Cheddar cheese.

But cheddar cheese isn't orange  :-\

That's what I was going to say.  Ladyknight, is it possible you are thinking of Red Leicester cheese?

In the US, what is marketed as Cheddar cheese is orange, or at least a dark yellow. The white cheddar sold is the same product, without color additives.

And this is my 1000th post!

I find that really interesting. I've never seen American cheddar, and now I really want to try some to see if it tastes like real cheddar.

American style cheddar is not going to the same if you just get a commercially available grocery store brand.  These normally come in mild, medium, sharp or extra sharp.  The texture is going to be a lot smoother than an English cheddar andanything other than the sharp or extra sharp is going to be extremely mild.  To get the yellow color, annato seed is used traditionally.  There are some small cheese producer who do make cheddars closer to an English style. 

jayhawk

  • Member
  • Posts: 1330
    • my organizing website
Re: Well, I never knew that! Share your interesting info...
« Reply #95 on: January 11, 2013, 04:05:04 PM »
Great. Now I want some cheese.

Bethczar

  • Member
  • Posts: 959
Re: Well, I never knew that! Share your interesting info...
« Reply #96 on: January 11, 2013, 04:17:52 PM »
Random fact: One of the first recorded uses of the word "baseball" in print in English is by Jane Austen, in Northanger Abbey. Somewhere in the first chapter, Catherine, the tomboyish heroine, plays "base ball" instead of sitting nicely and sewing. (You can check this in the OED.)

Just not the author you tend to think of first in relation to sports.
Jane Austen was also one of the first to use "doorbell", although I can't remember which book it was in.

We all have unique tongue prints. I wonder who decided to research that, though.  :P

Tea Drinker

  • Member
  • Posts: 2223
  • Now part of Team Land Crab
Re: Well, I never knew that! Share your interesting info...
« Reply #97 on: January 11, 2013, 06:57:33 PM »
An adult human can live quite normally with only one third of one kidney. I found this out when as a student nurse, in my Pediatric clinical rotation, I had to counsel the parents of a three-year-old who had been born with one atrophied kidney and was going for surgery to have it removed. Odd coincidence, the mother of the little one was someone I had worked with prior to going into Nursing.

My dad's cousin was 53 when he had to go in for some abdominal surgery....and learned for the first time that he only had one kidney!  Apparently, he was born with only one kidney but it was never discovered because he was healthy all those years and never had a reason for the doctors to find it.

One of my grandfather's kidneys atrophied, with no symptoms, sometime after his 70th birthday. At 95, he went to the hospital for something and, after doing whatever exams, found only one, when he'd had two twenty-five years earlier. (I don't know what they were checking on when he was 70.)
Any advice that requires the use of a time machine may safely be ignored.

sunnygirl

  • Member
  • Posts: 237
Re: Well, I never knew that! Share your interesting info...
« Reply #98 on: January 11, 2013, 07:02:20 PM »
And unique ear prints.

I always wondered what 'sharp' cheese was. Sounds like it's what we (in the UK) would call 'mature.'

Outdoor Girl

  • Member
  • Posts: 16769
Re: Well, I never knew that! Share your interesting info...
« Reply #99 on: January 11, 2013, 07:07:08 PM »
^^  My Mom, too.  Way back in the late 70's when cat scans were just coming into being, she went into hospital with severe pain.  And got a scan when the only people getting them were people who they suspected had cancer.  Scan was inconclusive so they did exploratory surgery and discovered that her left kidney was just a shell.  They figured that the pain was one last hurrah from the dead kidney.  They removed the shell while they were in there.

Funny story:  Shortly after Mom got home after her surgery, she had occasion to make bread.  She was kneading by hand and discovered that one of the suture lines was right at the height of the counter so she got Dad to do the kneading.  And since he was stronger, the bread was better kneaded and was lighter and generally just better.  So he was permanently conscripted until Mom got a food processor.
After cleaning out my Dad's house, I have this advice:  If you haven't used it in a year, throw it out!!!!.
Ontario

Lady Snowdon

  • Super cool awesome title
  • Member
  • Posts: 5793
Re: Well, I never knew that! Share your interesting info...
« Reply #100 on: January 11, 2013, 07:34:54 PM »
One of the common signs of depression is anhedonia - the inability to feel pleasure in normally pleasurable activities. 

jpcher

  • Member
  • Posts: 10435
Re: Well, I never knew that! Share your interesting info...
« Reply #101 on: January 11, 2013, 08:17:29 PM »
Upper case and Lower case letters . . . do you know where those terms come from?


Way back in the olden days when printed material was hand-set with individual letters, the majority of the letters used were small (as opposed to capital letters.)

The typesetter's desk was arranged with the small letters in one "case" (a lower level drawer) so that they would be more convenient to reach. The capital letters were in a different "case" (on a higher level or upper drawer, harder to reach.)


oz diva

  • Member
  • Posts: 1231
  • The Classics are SO last Century
Re: Well, I never knew that! Share your interesting info...
« Reply #102 on: January 11, 2013, 08:23:29 PM »
A former Prime Minister of Australia, Bob Hawke, was in the Guiness Book of Records for sculling 2.5 pints of beer in 11 seconds.

I don't care what party he is. I would totally vote for that guy.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o5mBShX9fdU

There ya go. Now you can see it!  ;D

Worth noting that he's 81 in this clip... and it's quite a few years since he led the country.  Still a proud Australian though... hand him a beer, call out "One for the country" and he sculls it without hesitation :D

The drink in the original post was a 'yard of ale' he skulled it while he was a Rhodes Scholar. I did vote for him.

Victoria

oz diva

  • Member
  • Posts: 1231
  • The Classics are SO last Century
Re: Well, I never knew that! Share your interesting info...
« Reply #103 on: January 11, 2013, 08:28:30 PM »
Canola oil comes from canola seeds - duh. But what are canola seeds?

As it turns out, the canola seed is not anything that would have ever existed without the intervention of man-made science and tinkering. What happened was that some agricultural scientists were trying to develop a new cooking oil. They started out using mustard seeds, but found them to be too acidic. So, through selective breeding and various modifications to the mustard seeds, those scientists "invented" the canola seed.

In fact, "canola" isn't even a proper word - it stands for Canada Oil Low Acidity: CAN(ada) O(il) L(ow) A(cidity).

(I just learned this a couple of weeks ago)
Another name for canola is rape.

Victoria

lady_disdain

  • Member
  • Posts: 5872
    • Contemporary Jewelry
Re: Well, I never knew that! Share your interesting info...
« Reply #104 on: January 11, 2013, 08:51:19 PM »
Buxtehude was considered the greatest organist of his age and musicians flocked to Lubeck to hear him play and, hopefully, get the chance to study with him, including Handel and Johann Sebastian Bach. Buxtehude also had the privilege of naming the successor to his lucrative church position. Even though he offered the post to several musicians, they all turned him down. Why? Because Buxtehude stipulated that, in order to get the post, they would have to marry his daughter first.

It says quite a lot about the lady that they all turned down the opportunity to study with the great master and have a good income for the rest of their lives to avoid her. As one scholar put it, "she was not a nice woman." In fact, Handel and his friend both received the offer and both jumped back into their coaches and ran back to their homes the very next day. Bach stayed longer in Lubeck, but he had just walked 400 miles to get there, so perhaps running wasn't quite as easy for him.