General Etiquette > Life...in general

Please don't tickle me

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Last_Dance:
This has (thankfully) become a moot point in the last years, but I'd still like some advice

I am horribly ticklish.
A light tickle is enough to keep me laughing for several minutes, unable to stop. If people tickle me hard enough, I lose control of my limbs and collapse in a giggling heap. It got so bad my body eventually started equating tickling with a physical attack and my "losing control of my limbs" turned into "lashing out": I'd wave my arms and kick, laughing hysterically all the while.

From kindergarten to high school, my various classmates used to find my reactions hilarious - until they got in the way of my arms or legs and got hit, at which point they'd go all "gee, it was just tickling, no need to be so violent!" as if I had done it on purpose. This would stop them, though only for a while: sooner or later they'd be back at it.

Tickling ambushes haven't happened in years, so now I can be tickled without automatically lashing out - however, I don't like being tickled. When somebody discovers how ticklish I am, I just say: "Yes, I'm extremely ticklish. I find it very annoying, so please don't do it" 

Unfortunately, the world is full of people who take "please don't do X" as an invitation to continue.
What should I do if I run into them?
Is there some way to make them stop before they re-awaken my "tickling = attack, must defend self" instincts and get kicked? 

Katana_Geldar:
Tickling is not always positive, it can be used as abuse or even torture.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tickling#Tickling_as_physical_abuse

What they are doing is not ok, and let them know this.

MrsCrazyPete:
I would let them know once politely. If they attempted to tickle me after that, I would act as if it were any other form of abuse. Use a loud voice. Put your hands up defensively. Move away. "STOP! I said do not touch me like that!"

Margo:

--- Quote from: MrsCrazyPete on January 07, 2013, 06:47:04 AM ---I would let them know once politely. If they attempted to tickle me after that, I would act as if it were any other form of abuse. Use a loud voice. Put your hands up defensively. Move away. "STOP! I said do not touch me like that!"

--- End quote ---
This. If they are touching you in a way you don't like, make it absolutely clear that that is not acceptable. Touching someone against their will is assault. And anyone who comes back with the 'it was only a joke / you've no sense of humour' type of comments should get a response which reiterates that the behavior isn't OK - "How is it funny for you to continue to touch me, against my will, in a way which I've made very clear to you is not OK?  Your actions amounted to an assault on me, and I don't think assaulting someone is ever 'fun'!"

I would not concern myself too much about not lashing out. If you lay hands on me without my permission and get yourself kicked in self defence it's your own silly fault for behaving in such a wayu in the first place.  Unless you are 6 or younger.

I'm also very ticklish in some places. I had some friends who thought this was hilarious until one of them tickeled my knee, which produced a (literally!) knee-jerk reaction which knocked into a table and tipped 6 nearly full pints of beer over the offending person. (we were in a pub at the time) Spending the rest of the evening it wet, beery clothing and having to buy 6 new drinks seemed to make an impression - he never did it again

Tea Drinker:
I've found that a friendly "Just so you know, the last time someone tickled me, I almost kicked his ribs in by reflex" was pretty effective. I tried to make it sound less like "don't you dare tickle me" than like a "danger: high voltage" warning sign: I am informing them of a fact, for their own safety.

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