General Etiquette > All In A Day's Work

Right to refusal?

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Hmmmmm:

--- Quote from: gramma dishes on January 13, 2013, 09:57:52 AM ---I agree with everyone above.  I think the candidate should carefully and politely leave Job A and accept job B.  That's what s/he really wanted all along and s/he will regret it forever if they don't accept the offer now. 

I especially agree that leaving Position A needs to be done carefully, with humility and gratitude for the opportunity because the two jobs are actually "related" and the candidate may indeed have future dealings with people currently at Place A.  It's best not to burn bridges.

--- End quote ---

Agree.  Work does not have the same rules as social engagements.  And as a manager, there is nothing worse than a recent college grad who would rather be somewhere else.  I'd rather the employee switch to the role they preferred rather than have me spend a year training them to then quit to take another position.

Outdoor Girl:
I'd take the dream job.  In most places, if there has been a recent interview, they can pull from that interview to offer a job to the next most qualified candidate.  Where I work, if the job is exactly the same in the same location, they can go back to an interview up to a year previously.

By leaving for the second job, that person may have made another person's dream job available.

gramma dishes:

--- Quote from: Outdoor Girl on January 13, 2013, 10:57:58 AM ---
...   By leaving for the second job, that person may have made another person's dream job available.

--- End quote ---

Excellent point!! 

Sharnita:
I would say that one should be very careful.  I know people who have worked in both fields and moved form one to the other.  At least around here they tend to go hand in hand - you need to work cooperatively with each other to get anything done.  To tick off people in area one could make your life extremely difficult as you try to accomplish anything in workplace two.  They need and rely on each other in a way that would make bad history a really bad idea.

dirtyweasel:
This situation actually happened to my mom a few years ago.  She had been working for Job A for about two weeks when she was offered a job at Company B.  Company B had better hours, better benefits and was closer to what my mom wanted to do with her career.  She gave her two week notice, started at the other company and hasn't regretted it yet.

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