General Etiquette > Techno-quette

Etiquette in a Text?

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Seraphia:
I'm with Carotte. 24 hours is a fair window for returning texts, unless it's something with a time context attached.

Example: "Hey, do we need anything from the store? I'm heading out in the next hour." Probably rude to return that text the next day.
"I saw this neat book - [picture]. Have you read it?" Fine to respond whenever it is that you get the chance.

My rule of thumb is - if I know you're working, I'd like a response soon, but I understand if you can't get to your phone until the end of the day or your lunch break. If I get a text, I assume the person sending it is un-busy enough to respond to more than one, since they texted me in the first place, unless they say specifically they can't talk now. (I can text at work, but I definitely prefer not to make phone calls) What I find rude is getting a text from someone, answering it with a question, and the person dropping off the face of the earth for 48 hours.

bah12:
First, I don't think text messages are adequate methods of communication when you are trying to have a conversation.  When I send a text to someone, I don't expect that they will necessarily see it right away or respond right away.  I respond to text messages when I can.  I use texting more for short messages like "Here's the address of the restaurant"  "meet me at 7"  "are you doing anything Saturday?"  "I'm on my way".  Short messages that don't require a lot (if any) back and forth. 

So, in that regard, I do think that 24 hours is a good window. 

If you're talking to a guy that you are "dating", and having long text conversations vs. phone or in person conversations, I see this as a red flag (Not saying that's happening here).   Texting is not a good way to have the "get to know you" or "this is how my day went" or philisophical or whatever conversations.  That's what phone calls and dates are for. 

MrTango:
I don't subscribe to any particular rule that says how long I have to respond to a text (or personal phone call, or personal email, for that matter).

I'll check my phone when I want to, and if I want to respond to a text, I'll do so.

My phone is on silent more often than not.

blarg314:

I'd say 24 hours is probably a good time line.

But there are big differences in personal texting style - a lot of people use texting as a chat mechanism, for conversation. Other people (like me) don't.

So if you keep sending out chatty texts, and get responses 24 hours later, then it's probably not useful to try to communicate that way. And if you're getting chatty texts you don't want to respond to, then it's worth mentioning to the other person that you would prefer phone-calls/email for conversations, and texts for short messages.

One consideration is the type of phone. Texting from a smart phone or phone with a keyboard is much easier than doing so from a numeric keypad. I want to type as little as possible from my stupid phone, so I may see the text, but respond later when I'm somewhere that I can send an email from a computer with a keyboard.

Yvaine:

--- Quote from: bah12 on January 18, 2013, 11:11:28 AM ---First, I don't think text messages are adequate methods of communication when you are trying to have a conversation.  When I send a text to someone, I don't expect that they will necessarily see it right away or respond right away.  I respond to text messages when I can.  I use texting more for short messages like "Here's the address of the restaurant"  "meet me at 7"  "are you doing anything Saturday?"  "I'm on my way".  Short messages that don't require a lot (if any) back and forth. 

--- End quote ---

I use it both for that and for silly asides that don't necessarily require a response--basically, the kind of thing to which the most intuitive response might be "LOL." It's annoying to have long deep conversations via text, though I might feel differently if I had a better phone with a better keypad and screen so it felt more like email.

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