Author Topic: Spin off dinner/supper time.  (Read 1147 times)

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Bijou

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Spin off dinner/supper time.
« on: January 19, 2013, 01:42:47 PM »
Just wondering...What do you call your evening meal?
I call mine Dinner.
I've never knitted anything I could recognize when it was finished.  Actually, I've never finished anything, much to my family's relief.

Amava

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Re: Spin off dinner/supper time.
« Reply #1 on: January 19, 2013, 01:55:44 PM »
I call mine "Avondeten".  >:D  ;)  (avond = evening , eten = food, meal)

When I speak English, though, I go with "supper". But when people say "dinner" I can usually see from the context whether they mean "noon dinner" or "evening dinner".

Most Americans I chat with call what's eaten at noon "lunch" and what's eaten in the evening "dinner".

TaurusGirl

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Re: Spin off dinner/supper time.
« Reply #2 on: January 19, 2013, 02:43:02 PM »
If it's just The Hawk and I, it's supper. If we're having company, it's dinner or tea.

Not sure why those two feel more formal, but they do :)

m2kbug

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Re: Spin off dinner/supper time.
« Reply #3 on: January 19, 2013, 03:40:07 PM »
Dinner. 

And since I'm thinking about it, davenport=couch.


TylerBelle

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Re: Spin off dinner/supper time.
« Reply #4 on: January 19, 2013, 03:44:33 PM »
Growing up it was supper. With the around noon time meal being dinner, though over the years I've gotten more used to referring to it as lunch with the later one being switched to dinner. ;D
Always be on the lookout for wonder. --E.B. White

ClaireC79

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Re: Spin off dinner/supper time.
« Reply #5 on: January 19, 2013, 03:59:55 PM »
tea unless it's a roast then it's dinner whatever time it's eaten (so Sunday dinner may be eaten at midday or 5pm)

HoneyBee42

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Re: Spin off dinner/supper time.
« Reply #6 on: January 19, 2013, 04:31:54 PM »
Depends on the day of week.

Sunday--dinner is around noon (and supper is in the evening).  The rest of the week, dinner is in the evening, and lunch is eaten around the middle of the day.


Gumbysqueak

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Re: Spin off dinner/supper time.
« Reply #7 on: January 19, 2013, 04:48:13 PM »
Dinner

jpcher

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Re: Spin off dinner/supper time.
« Reply #8 on: January 19, 2013, 05:00:53 PM »
Depends on the day of week.

Sunday--dinner is around noon (and supper is in the evening).  The rest of the week, dinner is in the evening, and lunch is eaten around the middle of the day.

This is how I grew up. "Dinner" being the heavier/more formal meal, which Sunday at noon was. Sunday night "Supper" was popcorn and sandwiches, usually in front of the TV watching "Sunday Mystery Movie."

In my thinking dinner is the formal term for a meal, while supper is more relaxed.

camlan

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Re: Spin off dinner/supper time.
« Reply #9 on: January 19, 2013, 05:09:42 PM »
Depends on the day of week.

Sunday--dinner is around noon (and supper is in the evening).  The rest of the week, dinner is in the evening, and lunch is eaten around the middle of the day.

This is how I grew up. "Dinner" being the heavier/more formal meal, which Sunday at noon was. Sunday night "Supper" was popcorn and sandwiches, usually in front of the TV watching "Sunday Mystery Movie."

In my thinking dinner is the formal term for a meal, while supper is more relaxed.

Add me in here. The big meal of the day is dinner, with, for some reason, Sunday dinner at noon, weeknight dinner in the evening.
Nothing is impossible, the word itself says, “I’m possible!” –Audrey Hepburn


Thipu1

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Re: Spin off dinner/supper time.
« Reply #10 on: January 20, 2013, 11:03:27 AM »
It depends. 

If we have sandwiches or soup at noon, the evening meal is dinner.

The restaurants around here offer very good and inexpensive two course lunch options.   if we go out for lunch, the evening meal is supper. 

Regardless, the meal in the middle of the day is always lunch.

AylaM

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Re: Spin off dinner/supper time.
« Reply #11 on: January 20, 2013, 07:59:16 PM »
In this house, dinner is interchangeable with supper.  Mostly it is called dinner though.  With one exception:
When grandma cooks and is calling everyone in, she always calls out "supper's ready!".


Luci

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Re: Spin off dinner/supper time.
« Reply #12 on: January 20, 2013, 10:48:09 PM »
Depends on the day of week.

Sunday--dinner is around noon (and supper is in the evening).  The rest of the week, dinner is in the evening, and lunch is eaten around the middle of the day.

Add holidays that have important meals, like Christmas, New Year Day, Easter, Thanksgiving, along with Sunday, and that's the way we call it, too.

Midwest US here.

snowdragon

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Re: Spin off dinner/supper time.
« Reply #13 on: January 20, 2013, 10:54:45 PM »
I call mine "Avondeten".  >:D  ;)  (avond = evening , eten = food, meal)

When I speak English, though, I go with "supper". But when people say "dinner" I can usually see from the context whether they mean "noon dinner" or "evening dinner".

Most Americans I chat with call what's eaten at noon "lunch" and what's eaten in the evening "dinner".

What language is this, Please? I'd like to learn more about it - languages are a passion of mine

Amava

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Re: Spin off dinner/supper time.
« Reply #14 on: January 21, 2013, 07:50:54 AM »
I call mine "Avondeten".  >:D  ;)  (avond = evening , eten = food, meal)

When I speak English, though, I go with "supper". But when people say "dinner" I can usually see from the context whether they mean "noon dinner" or "evening dinner".

Most Americans I chat with call what's eaten at noon "lunch" and what's eaten in the evening "dinner".

What language is this, Please? I'd like to learn more about it - languages are a passion of mine

It's Dutch! I live in the Dutch-speaking part of Belgium.

Ontbijt is Dutch for breakfast, by the way.
For what we eat at noon, we might use "middagmaal" (mid day meal) or use the word lunch just like in English.
We've borrowed the word "brunch", too.

The words "diner" and "souper" (from French) are sometimes still used in Dutch for formal occasions.