Author Topic: Hairdryers - Cautionary note  (Read 2430 times)

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DottyG

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Re: Hairdryers - Cautionary note
« Reply #15 on: June 12, 2013, 08:40:01 PM »
I always make sure that, if I'm buying a new curling iron, I get one with an auto-off feature.  Even with it, I always unplug it when I'm finished.  But, invariably, I will be in the car going somewhere and have this "OH MY GOODNESS.  DID I UNPLUG IT?  I think I did.  Did I?  I'm not sure.  Ok, I'm freaking out now" feeling.  At least I know that it does turn itself off after an hour by itself.


Harriet Jones

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Re: Hairdryers - Cautionary note
« Reply #16 on: June 12, 2013, 08:40:17 PM »
Quote
He also advises unplugging microwaves and stoves/ovens when going away for more than your normal work day.

I'm a bit confused on this part.  Unplugging the stove/oven would mean pulling the thing out all the time (not an easy task - it's wedged into the hole pretty tightly for a reason) and getting back behind it.  It's not as simple as it sounds like he's saying it is.

And I have no clue how to unplug a microwave.  It's built into the cabinet over the stove.  I'm assuming the plug is on the back.  But how the heck do you get to it?!

What about crockpots?  I know the draw of them is that you can put the food in it and leave it while you're at work.  But I can't do that.  Are they really safe?  Do y'all leave yours on unattended all day?  I feel nervous enough putting it on before bed and having it cook while I'm there asleep.

You could turn off the circuit that goes to those appliances.

DottyG

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Re: Hairdryers - Cautionary note
« Reply #17 on: June 12, 2013, 08:42:44 PM »
Which would also be the fridge and everything else in the kitchen.

How much of a risk are stoves and ovens if they're turned off?  I can see the other stuff - the little appliances.  But is there as much of a risk with the stove/oven/microwave?  What are the statistics on that?  (I'm asking that non-snarkily.)

In all my 46 years, I've never known a stove that's been turned off to suddenly ignite and start a fire.  Not to say it can't happen.  But, does it?

I'm saying this as someone who, faithfully, goes to her stove and oven before bed (and before leaving the home) and physically puts her hand on each burner and the oven to make sure they're actually all off.  Just one of those OCD things I do.
 
 

Bijou

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Re: Hairdryers - Cautionary note
« Reply #18 on: June 12, 2013, 08:49:20 PM »
Last night I washed/dried my hair, watched some TV, then went to bed.  Im a very sound sleeper.  (I took the hairdryer into my bedroom and sat down while using it.)  After a few hours sleep I thought I heard something, but was groggy and went back to continue my dream.  Then I heard a noise that woke me and also scared me it was the hairdryer!!!

 ??? I am 100% positive I turned it off. (It's so noisy anyway)  I got up, checked, and even though it was turned off it was still plugged in and had somehow turned itself on.

This was troublesome because as hot as they get, it could have started a fire.  Lesson:  always unplug the hairdryer.

Once I forgot to turn off/unplug my flatiron and left it on for an entire day, but I've never heard of a hairdryer turning itself on.   :-\  I've had this particular one for over 2 yrs, and this has never happened.
They can start a fire even if they are turned off but left plugged in.  Never leave your hair dryer plugged in when not in use.   
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Harriet Jones

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Re: Hairdryers - Cautionary note
« Reply #19 on: June 12, 2013, 09:00:18 PM »
Which would also be the fridge and everything else in the kitchen.

How much of a risk are stoves and ovens if they're turned off?  I can see the other stuff - the little appliances.  But is there as much of a risk with the stove/oven/microwave?  What are the statistics on that?  (I'm asking that non-snarkily.)

In all my 46 years, I've never known a stove that's been turned off to suddenly ignite and start a fire.  Not to say it can't happen.  But, does it?

I'm saying this as someone who, faithfully, goes to her stove and oven before bed (and before leaving the home) and physically puts her hand on each burner and the oven to make sure they're actually all off.  Just one of those OCD things I do.

I don't know that I've heard anything about ovens or microwaves, but we had a dishwasher that was recalled for short circuiting when left closed after a cycle was complete.

veronaz

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Re: Hairdryers - Cautionary note
« Reply #20 on: June 12, 2013, 09:25:50 PM »
Quote
What about crockpots?  I know the draw of them is that you can put the food in it and leave it while you're at work.  But I can't do that.  Are they really safe?  Do y'all leave yours on unattended all day?  I feel nervous enough putting it on before bed and having it cook while I'm there asleep.

Never owned a crockpot for this reason.


DottyG

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Re: Hairdryers - Cautionary note
« Reply #21 on: June 12, 2013, 09:32:35 PM »
Quote
What about crockpots?  I know the draw of them is that you can put the food in it and leave it while you're at work.  But I can't do that.  Are they really safe?  Do y'all leave yours on unattended all day?  I feel nervous enough putting it on before bed and having it cook while I'm there asleep.

Never owned a crockpot for this reason.



I wouldn't discount them - they do make some good food.  Slow simmering of food can be a good thing.

I use mine on weekends when I'm there and able to monitor it.  While I'm watching tv or something.


katycoo

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Re: Hairdryers - Cautionary note
« Reply #22 on: June 12, 2013, 09:54:44 PM »
Quote
He also advises unplugging microwaves and stoves/ovens when going away for more than your normal work day.

I'm a bit confused on this part.  Unplugging the stove/oven would mean pulling the thing out all the time (not an easy task - it's wedged into the hole pretty tightly for a reason) and getting back behind it.  It's not as simple as it sounds like he's saying it is.

And I have no clue how to unplug a microwave.  It's built into the cabinet over the stove.  I'm assuming the plug is on the back.  But how the heck do you get to it?!

What about crockpots?  I know the draw of them is that you can put the food in it and leave it while you're at work.  But I can't do that.  Are they really safe?  Do y'all leave yours on unattended all day?  I feel nervous enough putting it on before bed and having it cook while I'm there asleep.

I do.  A circuit breaker will avoid most problems and slow cookers are pretty much designed to be used all day without burning dry - providing (like anything) you use it properly.

Layla Miller

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Re: Hairdryers - Cautionary note
« Reply #23 on: June 12, 2013, 10:08:57 PM »
Quote
He also advises unplugging microwaves and stoves/ovens when going away for more than your normal work day.

I'm a bit confused on this part.  Unplugging the stove/oven would mean pulling the thing out all the time (not an easy task - it's wedged into the hole pretty tightly for a reason) and getting back behind it.  It's not as simple as it sounds like he's saying it is.

And I have no clue how to unplug a microwave.  It's built into the cabinet over the stove.  I'm assuming the plug is on the back.  But how the heck do you get to it?!

What about crockpots?  I know the draw of them is that you can put the food in it and leave it while you're at work.  But I can't do that.  Are they really safe?  Do y'all leave yours on unattended all day?  I feel nervous enough putting it on before bed and having it cook while I'm there asleep.

I do.  A circuit breaker will avoid most problems and slow cookers are pretty much designed to be used all day without burning dry - providing (like anything) you use it properly.

Me too, for many years.  Never had a problem.  :)
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TootsNYC

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Re: Hairdryers - Cautionary note
« Reply #24 on: June 12, 2013, 10:59:57 PM »
It's also possible the switch wasn't QUITE clicked into the "off" position, and it just slid back into the "on" position.

m2kbug

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Re: Hairdryers - Cautionary note
« Reply #25 on: June 13, 2013, 12:01:54 AM »
Which would also be the fridge and everything else in the kitchen.

How much of a risk are stoves and ovens if they're turned off?  I can see the other stuff - the little appliances.  But is there as much of a risk with the stove/oven/microwave?  What are the statistics on that?  (I'm asking that non-snarkily.)

In all my 46 years, I've never known a stove that's been turned off to suddenly ignite and start a fire.  Not to say it can't happen.  But, does it?

I'm saying this as someone who, faithfully, goes to her stove and oven before bed (and before leaving the home) and physically puts her hand on each burner and the oven to make sure they're actually all off.  Just one of those OCD things I do.

Perhaps if you were leaving for a couple of weeks, to make use of the circuit would be good, but that still leaves having to get rid of all kinds of perishables.  Some things you don't want to keep, but what about all that frozen stuff?  To pull out all of the appliances is just not practical and my microwave is attached under the cupboard too, so inaccessible.  I have never heard of unplugging the stove.  What about the fridge and washer and dryer?  I always unplug the small appliances before extended trips, but not necessarily during the day except for blow dryer/curling iron. 

I have heard of the dangers of crockpots, but given they're meant to be on for hours, you'd think they would have safety features.  Probably best to keep it someplace where it won't catch on anything if it sparks.  It's probably one of those things where you need to get a really good brand and replace it regularly if you use it often to prevent any malfunctions.

Would the GFCI plugs stop some of these mishaps?

Flibbertigibbet

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Re: Hairdryers - Cautionary note
« Reply #26 on: June 13, 2013, 07:30:03 AM »
In my experience (though I'm in the UK) the oven or stove is on its own circuit, and has a separate switch and fuse in the consumer unit  - so it can be isolated. Is that not the case in the US? When Im away for any length of time I do turn off all appliances other than the freezer and fridge (strange that we trust those not to spontaneously combust ;)), but thats just because as other posters have said, there is too much potential food wastage otherwise. I suppose we can also switch the outlet off; though to be honest I tend to actually unplug too - especially with hairdryers and straighteners.

iridaceae

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Re: Hairdryers - Cautionary note
« Reply #27 on: June 13, 2013, 07:37:00 AM »
In my experience (though I'm in the UK) the oven or stove is on its own circuit, and has a separate switch and fuse in the consumer unit  - so it can be isolated. Is that not the case in the US? When Im away for any length of time I do turn off all appliances other than the freezer and fridge (strange that we trust those not to spontaneously combust ;)), but thats just because as other posters have said, there is too much potential food wastage otherwise. I suppose we can also switch the outlet off; though to be honest I tend to actually unplug too - especially with hairdryers and straighteners.

I think it probably depends on the house/apartment. I admit I unplug my microwave in between uses and everything bug the fridge and stove get unplugged before I go on vacation.

Cami

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Re: Hairdryers - Cautionary note
« Reply #28 on: June 13, 2013, 07:39:47 AM »
Which would also be the fridge and everything else in the kitchen.

How much of a risk are stoves and ovens if they're turned off?  I can see the other stuff - the little appliances.  But is there as much of a risk with the stove/oven/microwave?  What are the statistics on that?  (I'm asking that non-snarkily.)

In all my 46 years, I've never known a stove that's been turned off to suddenly ignite and start a fire.  Not to say it can't happen.  But, does it?

I'm saying this as someone who, faithfully, goes to her stove and oven before bed (and before leaving the home) and physically puts her hand on each burner and the oven to make sure they're actually all off.  Just one of those OCD things I do.
It's one of those things that since I know people whose houses burned due to an appliance turning itself on, I don't really care about the stats.  I'd rather go through the 10 second "hassle" of turning off the breaker than come home to a burning house.

It's just like I never turned off my outside water when I was done with it until I lived next to obnoxious kids who think nothing of coming into my yard and turning on my house to play in the water and then leave the water running all night long. If it hasn't happened to you, it's probably too much trouble. When you get a HUGE water bill and have damage to your patio, then it's worth it go into the basement and turn off the water every day.
« Last Edit: June 13, 2013, 07:42:23 AM by Cami »

Outdoor Girl

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Re: Hairdryers - Cautionary note
« Reply #29 on: June 13, 2013, 09:22:14 AM »
A properly wired kitchen should have a separate circuit for every plug.  And since the stove is usually 220, not 110, it should definitely have its own circuit.  I've never thought about throwing the circuit when I'm away.  I don't unplug the small appliances, either.

I'm going to be redoing my kitchen in a couple of years so I think I'm going to make sure each of the plugs are on their own circuits and I may even have some switches installed for the plugs that will be used for my toaster oven and kettle.  That way, I can just turn the switch off.  I've never seen switches right on the plug like shown above but I have seen a lot of outlets controlled by a wall switch, mainly in living room or bedroom areas so that a lamp can be plugged in and shut off with the switch.  And since I'll have to replace the panel (I want whole home surge protection installed), I'll make sure everything is properly labelled and I'll know which breaker to throw for the stove.
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