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Author Topic: Proud kitchen moments, anyone? .  (Read 24984 times)

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Library Dragon

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Re: Proud kitchen moments, anyone? .
« Reply #75 on: December 25, 2014, 06:41:48 PM »
The puff pastry for our individual Beef Wellington's worked much better than I thought it would.  I used a  "rough" food processor recipe.  DS2 has developed a minor allergy to mushrooms, so the individual portions allowed me to keep his "clean". 

The pastry puffed and browned and the beef was a beautiful medium rare. 


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Black Delphinium

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Re: Proud kitchen moments, anyone? .
« Reply #76 on: December 25, 2014, 07:14:25 PM »
Back when we lived in State College, I hosted an early Thanksgiving for all my student friends. The one girl that came said to me " I was getting hungry and trying to decide what to make, then Boyfriend said you'd invited us for dinner, and I decided I could wait."

That was a wonderful compliment, one of the best I've ever gotten.
When angels go bad, they go worse than anyone. Remember, Lucifer was an angel. ~The Marquis De Carabas

caroled

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Re: Proud kitchen moments, anyone? .
« Reply #77 on: December 25, 2014, 10:13:14 PM »
Oh caroled, that sounds divine. Did you flame the pudding before serving?

I started to and had plans to flame, but my moms and SIL don't much care for the taste of the alcohol... at least the  fruit soaking alcohol had all been cooked away.

cicero

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Re: Proud kitchen moments, anyone? .
« Reply #78 on: December 26, 2014, 11:03:14 AM »
two things today -

first, i made risotto for the first time in my life. it was so yummy. i didn't have white wine so i just omitted it (internet said that was ok). i made with mushroom, sweet potato cubes, parmesan, onion. i didn't have the herbs, either. next time i'll make something a bit more adventurous.

second- i bought saffron. i don't know why i never bought it before. well the thing is that it's always considered something so expensive, but i understand that  alittle bit goes a long way. anyway, i added a pinch to couscous (unfortunately, to avoid adding too much, i added too little but now i know for next time). previously, DS always added a little tumeric to the couscous while i usually add a pinch of cinnamon (trick i learnt from my former MIL).

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gmatoy

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Re: Proud kitchen moments, anyone? .
« Reply #79 on: December 27, 2014, 12:02:07 AM »
When my daughter was moving to Utah in August, they came through Oklahoma.  I hosted about 14 people and fixed pulled pork and pork loin, and a whole variety of sides and dessert!  I was so proud of myself!  What my mother said is not worth repeating on this board.  It was wonderful though and I was impressed with myself even if she wasn't!

That sounds wonderful!! I would be thrilled if someone made that for me!

Venus193

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Re: Proud kitchen moments, anyone? .
« Reply #80 on: December 28, 2014, 07:58:59 AM »
My chicken vindaloo was a hit last night.  I adapted the recipe on Epicurious.com and made it comparatively mild because I didn't know the other people's spice level preferences and brought a smallish jar of the spice blend if they wanted to kick it up another notch.  One of the guests was from India and he said "I love to cook; let's collaborate next time!"

I suggested we do tandoori chicken.

Now I'm searching for a Thai recipe for the rest of the chicken in my fridge.





Jloreli

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Re: Proud kitchen moments, anyone? .
« Reply #81 on: December 28, 2014, 08:10:05 AM »
Yule logs! I was fascinated by them as a child when looking at Mom's illustrated cook book. Well this year I went for it and made 3. With cannoli filling and chocolate ganache frosting.  I made little mushrooms with marzipan stems and raspberry caps and some with chocolate rolo candy stems and marshmallow caps. I fell like such a pro! And the reviews were fantastic! I will definitely make them again but perhaps not 3 in one season..... ;D

cicero

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Re: Proud kitchen moments, anyone? .
« Reply #82 on: December 28, 2014, 08:18:03 AM »
My chicken vindaloo was a hit last night.  I adapted the recipe on Epicurious.com and made it comparatively mild because I didn't know the other people's spice level preferences and brought a smallish jar of the spice blend if they wanted to kick it up another notch.  One of the guests was from India and he said "I love to cook; let's collaborate next time!"

I suggested we do tandoori chicken.

Now I'm searching for a Thai recipe for the rest of the chicken in my fridge.
I've made this one
http://www.eatingthaifood.com/2014/03/authentic-thai-grilled-chicken-recipe-gai-yang/

now, I can't vouch for its authenticity but it's definitely yum. I made in our oven. and i didn't exactly  have every single ingredient so i made some substitutions (in red).

Authentic Thai Grilled Chicken Recipe
Here's the full video recipe: http://youtu.be/3l9omsiaO2M which you should watch before anything else. Also, for more authentic Thai recipes, click here. Enjoy!
Author: Mark Wiens (http://www.eatingthaifood.com/)

Recipe type: Grilled Chicken
Cuisine: Thai
Serves: 4
Ingredients
2 whole chickens (mine were 1.8 kilos each)
Bamboo sticks or skewers
Charcoal
Grill
Marinade
4 tablespoons soy sauce
1 tablespoon fish sauce (omitted because i didn't have)
2 tablespoons palm sugar (used light brown sugar)
1 tablespoon dark soy sauce (only had one kind of soy sauce)
8 tablespoons water
4 heads garlic (30 - 40 cloves) (used less)
2 stalks lemongrass (used grate lemon rind)
2.5 tablespoons black pepper corns
8 coriander roots (optional) (used fresh coriander, chopped up included thicker parts of the stalks)

Gai Yang Sauce - (didn't make this - just served with thai sweet chili sauce)
1.5 tablespoons khao kua (see method here)
1.5 tablespoons chili flakes
1 tablespoon of sugar
3 tablespoons fish sauce
8 tablespoons tamarind juice (you can add more or less according to how strong it is and how sweet and sour you want your sauce)
Few sprigs of cilantro
Instructions
For this recipe, Iím going to cook 2 full chickens, together weighing in at 3.6 kilos. If you wanted, you could also make this recipe with 3 - 4 kilos of chicken pieces, or really, however much chicken you want.
For this gai yang (ไก่ย่าง) to be at its finest, itís best to marinate the chicken overnight and grill it the next day, but if you don't have the time, marinate the chicken for at least a few hours.
Chicken marinade
Peel about 4 bulbs of garlic, which should be about 30 - 40 cloves in all.
Thinly slice 2 stalks of lemongrass and cut off the roots of 8 stalks of coriander.
Now comes the hard part, pounding everything using a mortar and pestle (If you donít have a mortar and pestle you can blend the ingredients in a food processor (but Iíd really recommend you invest in a Thai style mortar and pestle).
Add small amounts of garlic, lemongrass, black peppercorns, and coriander roots to the mortar and pestle and pound them until the oils come out, and you have a coarse paste. Keep pounding until all the marinade ingredients are finished. Youíll probably need to load the mortar a few times.
Put all the pounded marinade ingredients in a mixing bowl, stir them up, and add 4 tablespoons of light soy sauce, 1 tablespoon of dark soy sauce, 1 tablespoon of fish sauce, and 2 tablespoons of palm sugar. Mix everything together while adding about 8 tablespoons of water to the mixture. You should end up with a potent marinade that looks like a chunky garlicky sauce.
If youíre using whole chickens, you'll want to butterfly cut them starting from the breast side down to the butt. Flatten the chickens out. This is going to prepare it for the grill (Watch the video to see how to do it).
In a big pan or mixing bowl start to rub the marinade on the chicken, making sure the garlic, herbs, and soy sauce go into all parts of the chicken. Rub down both chickens using all the marinade.
Cover the chickens and allow them to rest overnight. You might stir them a couple of times if you remember.
Grilling
The next day, take out your chicken, and the first step is to light your charcoal. You want a low even heat, coals that aren't too hot, but a low and even.
Put the chicken on the grill and begin cooking!
Wait about 20 minutes or so (but monitoring them to make sure they don't burn), before making your first flip. You can baste the chicken with the extra marinade.
Cook the chicken on low heat for about 1.5 hours, until the chicken is cooked through to the bone and the skin is golden dark brown on the outside.
Take the chicken off the grill, and dismantle the bamboo supports.
If you have a Chinese cleaver, first cut the chicken in half from the neck to the butt, and from there cut off the drumstick, wing, and chop the rest of the chicken into strips.
Gai yang sauce (Nam jim jaew น้ำจิ้มแจ่ว)
Semi-dried tamarind pulp can usually be bought at the supermarket in a small block. To rehydrate it, get a couple tablespoons of hot water and start to work the tamarind into the hot water. This should turn it into a nice tamarind water sauce.
In a bowl, mix 1.5 tablespoons of khao kua (toasted sticky rice, recipe here), 1.5 tablespoons of chili flakes, 1 tablespoon of sugar, 3 tablespoons of fish sauce, and 8 tablespoons of tamarind juice.
Mix all of the ingredients together.
After mixing up the sauce, make sure you taste test. You're looking for the perfect sweet, sour, and salty combination. You might need to add more tamarind juice, more sugar, or more fish sauce to balance it out.
Top off your gai yang sauce with some chopped up cilantro.
Happy eating!
Notes
Thai grilled chicken (gai yang ไก่ย่าง) is often eaten with som tam (green papaya salad) and sticky rice. The combination makes for an outstandingly tasty meal!


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Venus193

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Re: Proud kitchen moments, anyone? .
« Reply #83 on: December 28, 2014, 11:33:07 AM »
Wow; that's a time commitment!

My oven is shot at the moment so my next culinary adventure will just use the burners on top.  I just bought some red curry paste, coconut milk, basil, and veg.  I probably have what I need for peanut sauce as well.
« Last Edit: December 28, 2014, 06:35:38 PM by Venus193 »





cicero

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Re: Proud kitchen moments, anyone? .
« Reply #84 on: December 28, 2014, 01:06:06 PM »
Wow; that's a time commitment!

My oven is shot at the moment so my next culinary adventure will just use the burners on top.  I just bought some red curry paste, coconut milk, basic, and veg.  I probably have what I need for peanut sauce as well.
i probably used a few short cuts. ANd yes, it was a big hoopla but soooo worth it. i think one of the best chicken dishes i ever had.

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greencat

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Re: Proud kitchen moments, anyone? .
« Reply #85 on: December 28, 2014, 02:27:57 PM »
I learned how to make pudding from scratch.  It involves a lot of stirring and wondering if you did it right...and then abruptly, the liquid turns into pudding.

The first time I successfully baked bread and had it turn out alright was pretty amazing.  The times after that, when I managed to repeat it, were better - my mom has about a 25% success ratio with bread.  Now I need to make gluten-free bread, and I expect that to be a kitchen-destroying challenge.

KenveeB

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Re: Proud kitchen moments, anyone? .
« Reply #86 on: December 28, 2014, 02:54:34 PM »
I made Cranberry Bliss Bars (cookie bars with white chocolate chips and dried cranberries) for our extended family Christmas this year. Everyone raved over them, and several of my aunts asked for the recipe! They're all big cooks, so it's a very proud moment when they like my stuff!

doodlemor

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Re: Proud kitchen moments, anyone? .
« Reply #87 on: December 28, 2014, 05:27:06 PM »
On Christmas Day I got up and cooked a big dinner from scratch, and it all came out good.  This was not fancy food, but grandchildren friendly dining.  I made baked ham, Swedish meatballs, potatisgratšng[potatoes au gratin], green beans with bacon, corn, salad, home made rolls [I used the bread machine to make the dough, but the recipe is mine], Swedish apple pie, and chocolate roll [dromtarta.]

We ran out of leftovers today, so tomorrow I'll be back to cooking again.

happygrrl

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Re: Proud kitchen moments, anyone? .
« Reply #88 on: December 28, 2014, 05:53:33 PM »
Well, much to my mil's chagrin, I won a city wide contest for best cake. Won a professional Kitchen Aid mixer and all the fame I could take! :)
"I am the laziest person on Earth. I want to learn to photosynthesize so I can buy a sun lamp and survive without getting out of bed."  M-theory 11/23/10

apoptosis

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Re: Proud kitchen moments, anyone? .
« Reply #89 on: December 28, 2014, 06:24:25 PM »
Well, much to my mil's chagrin, I won a city wide contest for best cake. Won a professional Kitchen Aid mixer and all the fame I could take! :)

And more than your mil could take!  >:D