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Salespeople question

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Knitterly:

--- Quote from: citadelle on January 20, 2013, 06:50:32 PM ---If a salesperson has a reaction to a customer's smell, should s/ he politely hand that customer off to someone slse? What if it is a cashier who reacts to a customer's cologne?

--- End quote ---

That is an interesting question, but it is not the point at all. 

First, if a salesperson has a reaction to a customer's smell, they can hand off the customer without any awkwardness at all.  They can simply say "let me find someone who can help you better."  The case of the cashier is more difficult and if one has a strong sensitivity to smells, then perhaps a job dealing with the public is a poor fit.

It is a completely different situation for the salesperson to deal with than it is for the customer.  How can a customer politely say "I don't want you to help me."  I don't know if there is a way to do this politely and unawkwardly.  Dealing with the public is an understood part of the salesperson's job.  Dealing with their smell is, I think, an unspoken part of that. 

But does a customer get to have a say in who helps them?  For example, if the sales rep were someone with whom I was on unfriendly terms were to be the salesperson who answered the call, I would also not want to deal with them and would probably leave the store. 

Hmmmmm:

--- Quote from: Knitterly on January 20, 2013, 07:02:09 PM ---
--- Quote from: citadelle on January 20, 2013, 06:50:32 PM ---If a salesperson has a reaction to a customer's smell, should s/ he politely hand that customer off to someone slse? What if it is a cashier who reacts to a customer's cologne?

--- End quote ---

That is an interesting question, but it is not the point at all. 

First, if a salesperson has a reaction to a customer's smell, they can hand off the customer without any awkwardness at all.  They can simply say "let me find someone who can help you better."  The case of the cashier is more difficult and if one has a strong sensitivity to smells, then perhaps a job dealing with the public is a poor fit.

It is a completely different situation for the salesperson to deal with than it is for the customer.  How can a customer politely say "I don't want you to help me."  I don't know if there is a way to do this politely and unawkwardly.  Dealing with the public is an understood part of the salesperson's job.  Dealing with their smell is, I think, an unspoken part of that. 

But does a customer get to have a say in who helps them?  For example, if the sales rep were someone with whom I was on unfriendly terms were to be the salesperson who answered the call, I would also not want to deal with them and would probably leave the store.

--- End quote ---

I agree with Knitterly.  It is much easier for a salesperson to say "I'm sorry, I'm helping another customer, let me get someone else for you."  I just don't know how happy I'd be if I was the "new" salesperson brought in to deal with smelly customer. 

Rosewater:
This is a business transaction, not a social one.  There is no reason you can't say that your allergies are driving you crazy and could someone help you who isn't wearing scent.  This way it's a problem you are having with yourself as opposed to anything the other person is doing.  I would think the store would prefer you do this rather than leave and not return.

If people insist on dousing themselves in cologne then they need to accept that they will be offensive to some and it may cause people to not want to be around them.  This is what happens when you don't pay attention to the details of your personal grooming. 

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