Author Topic: British English question  (Read 2169 times)

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Morticia

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British English question
« on: January 28, 2013, 01:44:03 PM »
If you say you are off "from Wednesday" do you mean you are off Wednesday and after, or you are off after Wednesday.  Thank you.
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Perfect Circle

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Re: British English question
« Reply #1 on: January 28, 2013, 02:46:56 PM »
Off Wednesday and after.
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emwithme

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Re: British English question
« Reply #2 on: January 28, 2013, 03:24:32 PM »
You would not see me on Wednesday. 

cabbageweevil

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Re: British English question
« Reply #3 on: January 29, 2013, 08:50:05 AM »
Brit here: agree with the last two posters, that "off Wednesday and after" is very much the usual meaning. I tend, however, to say something like "from Wednesday inclusive" -- just because of the semi-rule in life that "anything which can be misunderstood, will be misunderstood".

Margo

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Re: British English question
« Reply #4 on: March 04, 2013, 02:48:11 PM »
I agree. 'From Wednesday' would mean you wouldn't be seeing me on Wednesday, but like cabbageweevil, if it was important (say, if I'm arranging time off) I'd probably say "From Wednesday to Friday, inclusive."

katycoo

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Re: British English question
« Reply #5 on: May 01, 2013, 10:23:51 PM »
"From XX" means that time and going forward.

Compare to "I'll be in a meeting from 3 until 6."  When the hour of 3 commences, the person becomes unavailable.

When Wednesday commences, the person becomes unavailable.

Zilla

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Re: British English question
« Reply #6 on: May 02, 2013, 09:29:04 AM »
American here and I would take it as Wednesday and after whether the person was British or not.  What was the confusion out of curiosity?