General Etiquette > Life...in general

How to avoid someone unpleasant and make the least amount of waves....

<< < (2/8) > >>

TurtleDove:

--- Quote from: GrammarNerd on January 23, 2013, 11:14:13 AM ---OP here....also forgot to ask that if I'm already there (like she's late) when she comes in, and she wants me to get a footstool for her, or do something else for her, is there any polite way to refuse? 
--- End quote ---

I think you can just say, "No, I am busy."  She is asking you for a favor.  It is never impolite to not agree to do the favor.  And if I am understanding correctly, she can get the footstool herself, she just prefers not to.  This is a want of hers, not a need.  And you certainly do not have to cater to her.

Twik:
Unfortunately, while on the clock, I don't think you can refuse to serve her as you would any other customer, unless your employer has specifically authorized you to avoid her, or you can find other work that takes priority over getting her footstools and turning on fans.

GrammarNerd:
Thanks for the responses.  And to clarify....I am not working when I see her or potentially interact with her.  At that point, I am a patron like anyone else.  My function for my job doesn't intersect with her at all; we just happen to want to use the same facilities (the computers), and at that point, we're both patrons, basically. 

I just worry about how it would look to other patrons if I refuse to do something for her that I could do more easily than she could; if it would reflect badly on me when people don't know the backstory.  After all, they know me as an employee, even though it would be obvious I'm not on duty.

And that very thing actually did just happen last week; I was happily using the computers when she wasn't there and I was chatting (softly) with a coworker.  I saw NastyWoman come in and I started to leave.  She was right in front of me and as I stepped around her, she asked me to go across the room and get her a footstool.  The only thing I could think of doing on the spur of the moment was to say "No, I really have to get going, but you could ask (coworker)."  I HATED throwing coworker under the bus like that, and I apologized profusely to her a few minutes later when coworker left, after explaining the backstory.  Coworker was very nice and said that with the backstory, she'd probably feel the same way.

TurtleDove:
It might help to know some facts about what this person did to wrong you, but depending on what she did I think you could also say, "I am not working right now, and given the way you _____ I am not going to help you."

MrTango:
I think the disability, no matter what it is, is irrelevant.


--- Quote from: TurtleDove on January 23, 2013, 11:38:21 AM ---It might help to know some facts about what this person did to wrong you, but depending on what she did I think you could also say, "I am not working right now, and given the way you _____ I am not going to help you."

--- End quote ---

I think the OP would be fine with saying "I am not working right now"  once (and only once) and then going about her business.

Navigation

[0] Message Index

[#] Next page

[*] Previous page

Go to full version