General Etiquette > All In A Day's Work

Do I really have to go?

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DavidH:
I'd recommend going since it sounds like the company has made a lot of effort to send everyone and views it as doing something nice.  You can always use the breaks for networking either within your current company with others there.

In some ways, it's like getting a gift you don't like, you still have to accept it.

Missing a day's pay is not great, but rather than think of it as missed, think of it as an investment in networking if that helps. 

WillyNilly:
I think you should approach the HR/owner and address the pay issue.  Couch it in real terms "I am really hoping to be able to stay with this company, I really like it here, but realistically I know my contract is expiring and Mary wants to come back, which means I might be unemployed. I have to really think about long term expenses and income and plan accordingly. While I appreciate you including me, I feel as though its something that I can't really afford in the grand scheme of things."

If you are offered a new contract, well then, no money worries and you go and you mentally tick it ff as the cost of getting the job.  Otherwise its a gracious way of backing out - they shouldn't pressure you to essentially pay for something while also sending you off to be unemployed.

BeagleMommy:
We refer to these trainings as "dog and pony shows".  You're not sure of the point of them, but there was a dog and a pony.

POD to the others who've said it is probably in your best interest to go.

MorgnsGrl:
Personally (and clearly I am in the minority here) I don't think you have to go. If they told you to come in to work on Friday, but you wouldn't be paid, would you? (Especially knowing everyone else WAS being paid?) I get that it can be good to be seen as a team player, but since you realistically have no reason to think you're anything more than a temp as far as this company is concerned, you're not really "part of the team" anyway. The team gets paid. I think this would only leave a bad impression for the HR lady is she's a really unfair individual -- and it doesn't sound like she is. In my opinion, asking an employee to lose a day's pay but not giving them leave to do whatever they like with that day isn't acceptable.

Hmmmmm:

--- Quote from: WillyNilly on January 24, 2013, 02:46:01 PM ---I think you should approach the HR/owner and address the pay issue.  Couch it in real terms "I am really hoping to be able to stay with this company, I really like it here, but realistically I know my contract is expiring and Mary wants to come back, which means I might be unemployed. I have to really think about long term expenses and income and plan accordingly. While I appreciate you including me, I feel as though its something that I can't really afford in the grand scheme of things."

If you are offered a new contract, well then, no money worries and you go and you mentally tick it ff as the cost of getting the job.  Otherwise its a gracious way of backing out - they shouldn't pressure you to essentially pay for something while also sending you off to be unemployed.

--- End quote ---

This is what I would do.

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