Author Topic: Rude to tell someone not to walk on freshly washed floor?  (Read 5405 times)

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buvezdevin

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Re: Rude to tell someone not to walk on freshly washed floor?
« Reply #15 on: January 24, 2013, 05:41:17 PM »
I would have wondered at the urgency, but the aunt apparently took offense at OP "putting the floor before" the aunt in consideration, instead of the aunt expressing an urgent need.  That, coupled with "you'll have to clean uo after me" rather than "I will clean up, but need to come in quickly" sure sounds like a lot of entitlement on Aunt's part.

I am also thinking that if Aunt has the ability, and time for walking distances in the snow, she is capable of cleaning up a floor she has tracked across.

I would not be extending an apology, though I would be open to receiving one.
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snowdragon

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Re: Rude to tell someone not to walk on freshly washed floor?
« Reply #16 on: January 24, 2013, 05:45:33 PM »
If she lives less than a mile away and had to stop at yours to use the bathroom, any chance she didn't have time to take off her boots?

She would have said so. But either way I would not be too happy to have rescrub the floor because she didn't. If it were that desperate she could have stopped at either the gas station or the donut shop ( Tim Horton's) at the either end of my street and gotten to the bathroom sooner.

Thipu1

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Re: Rude to tell someone not to walk on freshly washed floor?
« Reply #17 on: January 24, 2013, 05:47:03 PM »
I know that families differ about what is considered acceptable behavior by relatives but this seems a bit over the top in a few ways. 

Are Snowdragon's relatives in the habit of using her home as a comfort station?  I hope not.

We're a shoes-on household but would never think of going in any home with wet, snowy or muddy footwear unless we were coming in to save someone from a fire. It doesn't matter if Aunt was at the doctor's office or out shopping, there was probably a place she could relieve herself and not drop in unannounced.

If a floor has been freshly washed, there's an extra reason to deny immediate access. 

No.  Aunt was wrong here and doubly wrong to demand an apology from Snowdragon. 

As my Grandmother said at the middle of the 20 th century, 'In this age of the telephone, there is no reason for dropping in without calling first.'

oopsie

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Re: Rude to tell someone not to walk on freshly washed floor?
« Reply #18 on: January 24, 2013, 08:28:22 PM »
Yeah, your aunt was definitely rude on so very many different levels. Accusing you of being rude is the cherry on the rude sundae. Makes my head spin actually.

Hmmmmm

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Re: Rude to tell someone not to walk on freshly washed floor?
« Reply #19 on: January 24, 2013, 08:34:55 PM »
Who were you saving the freshly washed floors for? I get the idea of asking someone to not walk in wet floors because they end up with oot prints.  But if the floor is dry, how long we're you planning on them being a no walk zone? Or is the issue not that the floors were freshly washed but that you didn't want snowy boots in your house.

Luci45

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Re: Rude to tell someone not to walk on freshly washed floor?
« Reply #20 on: January 24, 2013, 08:46:02 PM »
I guess she didn't have to use the restroom very badly if she chose to give the comment and leave rather than complying with your request!

I also am a shoes on in the house person, but, as others have said, not on a damp newly washed floor with snow.

I would have wondered at the urgency, but the aunt apparently took offense at OP "putting the floor before" the aunt in consideration, instead of the aunt expressing an urgent need.

Nicely put!

Knitterly

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Re: Rude to tell someone not to walk on freshly washed floor?
« Reply #21 on: January 24, 2013, 09:33:23 PM »
Wait, your aunt stopped by unannounced, less than a mile from home, to use the bathroom? And she calls you rude? Never mind the rest of the episode.

If she were mine, she’d be waiting for eternity for an apology about the shoe thing. If it weren’t rude to point out rudeness, I’d be requesting an apology for the unexpected drop by and verbal abuse.

It sounds as if she wanted to mark snowdragon's house in two ways.

*snert*

No.  Even more broadly, if someone makes a decision that they do not want shoes worn in their home, then it is rude to insist on wearing shoes in their home.  This is especially true in this case, as the aunt's shoes were covered in snow.

I agree with this!  Completely!

Also, even if someone is generally okay with people leaving their shoes on, I still think it's pretty rude to track snow through someone's house, freshly washed floors or not.

Rohanna

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Re: Rude to tell someone not to walk on freshly washed floor?
« Reply #22 on: January 24, 2013, 10:16:48 PM »
Who were you saving the freshly washed floors for? I get the idea of asking someone to not walk in wet floors because they end up with oot prints.  But if the floor is dry, how long we're you planning on them being a no walk zone? Or is the issue not that the floors were freshly washed but that you didn't want snowy boots in your house.

If the floors weren't freshly washed, then one would feel a little less annoyed because they could probably use a cleaning anyways- so the effort of cleaning them wouldn't be "wasted".
My friends, love is better than anger. Hope is better than fear. Optimism is better than despair. So let us be loving, hopeful and optimistic. And we’ll change the world. ~ Jack Layton.

snowdragon

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Re: Rude to tell someone not to walk on freshly washed floor?
« Reply #23 on: January 24, 2013, 10:44:14 PM »
Who were you saving the freshly washed floors for? I get the idea of asking someone to not walk in wet floors because they end up with oot prints.  But if the floor is dry, how long we're you planning on them being a no walk zone? Or is the issue not that the floors were freshly washed but that you didn't want snowy boots in your house.

 Why do I have to justify any of that? Really, this is my home, I just spent a good deal of time cleaning it and someone who does not live here gets to mess it up at will and I have to justify not wanting it messed up and how long I want it remain clean and who I want walking on it?
   People who exhibit common courtesy will be welcome, those who can't will not be.

jaxsue

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Re: Rude to tell someone not to walk on freshly washed floor?
« Reply #24 on: January 25, 2013, 12:11:06 AM »
Who were you saving the freshly washed floors for? I get the idea of asking someone to not walk in wet floors because they end up with oot prints.  But if the floor is dry, how long we're you planning on them being a no walk zone? Or is the issue not that the floors were freshly washed but that you didn't want snowy boots in your house.

I don't think the OP needs to defend her motives. Even if my floors hadn't just been mopped, I wouldn't let people track snow, mud, or leaves in.

CakeEater

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Re: Rude to tell someone not to walk on freshly washed floor?
« Reply #25 on: January 25, 2013, 07:22:26 AM »
Who were you saving the freshly washed floors for? I get the idea of asking someone to not walk in wet floors because they end up with oot prints.  But if the floor is dry, how long we're you planning on them being a no walk zone? Or is the issue not that the floors were freshly washed but that you didn't want snowy boots in your house.

 Why do I have to justify any of that? Really, this is my home, I just spent a good deal of time cleaning it and someone who does not live here gets to mess it up at will and I have to justify not wanting it messed up and how long I want it remain clean and who I want walking on it?
   People who exhibit common courtesy will be welcome, those who can't will not be.

Sounds like you have already decided that you weren't rude.

Because really, just answering the question in your title, I would say that yes, it is rude to tell someone not to walk on freshly washed floors, assuming the floor was dry. Floors are for walking on, after all, and at some point after washing, they will get dirty again, so making people keep off them completely as a general rule for an unspecified length of time is a bit pointless, and I think, rude to whoever is needing to walk on them.

Your actual question doesn't really have to do with the freshly-washed state of the floors - it has more to do with asking someone to take their wet, dirty shoes off in your house. I suspect that most here would object to someone doing that, regardless of the state of their floors beforehand. I would, and I'm very much a shoes on in the house kind of person.

HoneyBee42

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Re: Rude to tell someone not to walk on freshly washed floor?
« Reply #26 on: January 25, 2013, 08:00:06 AM »
I agree that the OP doesn't have to justify--but I also agree that there's a special annoyance factor involved when one has *just* completed a cleaning project and someone comes along and deliberately messes it up before you've had time to enjoy the cleanliness.

For me, it used to be the bathroom sink--I have a "thing" about toothpaste spit.  When I was still married and homeschooled the children, I would clean our bathroom once a week and I'd get that sink all shined-up.  My children could manage to brush their teeth after lunch and wash the toothpaste down.  But my now-ex used to come home from work, brush his teeth and leave toothpaste spit *all over* the sink and leave skidmarks on the toilet seat.  I'd ask him if he could make the effort to wash it down so that I could have at least 24 hours of clean sink.  Never happened.  Once I kicked him to the curb (not over the toothpaste spit and skidmarks on the toilet seat), I haven't had to deal with toothpaste spit in my sink since.  Same thing with my kitchen floor--in that house, one entered through the laundry room (where five of six of us took off shoes, guess who didn't) and from the laundry room through the kitchen into the rest of the house.  It was as though as soon as he came home and saw I had cleaned any particular thing, he *had* to make a mess on it (tracking snow across a dry, yet clean, kitchen floor, making a PBJ and smearing PB and jelly on the counter and leaving it *and* leaving the jars open right where he used them).  Funny how, once we removed one person from the household, the work load of keeping the place clean lightened by more than 50%.

Yes, floors are for walking on, and they tend to get dirty as a result.  But when the OP says "just finished" I'm picturing a floor that may still have some wet spots and she hadn't yet had time to stand in the room doorway and smile over the results of her efforts.  People who live in the house generally know (unless they're rude boors like my ex) that when some cleaning work has just been finished that it's not ok to deliberately mess it up.   Someone who doesn't even live there dismissively intending to make a mess and act like it's no big deal to just "wipe up after"--that's just astonishingly rude, particularly given that the OP mentioned that the aunt wouldn't have had an issue doing that w/ someone who is "on her same tier" (i.e., a sister instead of a niece) and that aunt had plenty of other bathroom options that wouldn't involve imposing on anyone.


Hmmmmm

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Re: Rude to tell someone not to walk on freshly washed floor?
« Reply #27 on: January 25, 2013, 08:27:22 AM »
Who were you saving the freshly washed floors for? I get the idea of asking someone to not walk in wet floors because they end up with oot prints.  But if the floor is dry, how long we're you planning on them being a no walk zone? Or is the issue not that the floors were freshly washed but that you didn't want snowy boots in your house.

 Why do I have to justify any of that? Really, this is my home, I just spent a good deal of time cleaning it and someone who does not live here gets to mess it up at will and I have to justify not wanting it messed up and how long I want it remain clean and who I want walking on it?
   People who exhibit common courtesy will be welcome, those who can't will not be.

Sounds like you have already decided that you weren't rude.

Because really, just answering the question in your title, I would say that yes, it is rude to tell someone not to walk on freshly washed floors, assuming the floor was dry. Floors are for walking on, after all, and at some point after washing, they will get dirty again, so making people keep off them completely as a general rule for an unspecified length of time is a bit pointless, and I think, rude to whoever is needing to walk on them.

Your actual question doesn't really have to do with the freshly-washed state of the floors - it has more to do with asking someone to take their wet, dirty shoes off in your house. I suspect that most here would object to someone doing that, regardless of the state of their floors beforehand. I would, and I'm very much a shoes on in the house kind of person.
Thanks, Cake earner, you got to the heart of my questions. 

Snowdragon, not sure about why my question made you feel defensive. If I had cleaned in preparation of a party later in the day then I would be more protective of them staying spotless. And I completely understand not wanting wet moody boots tramped through my house whether they are on freshly washed floors or ones that I hadn't cleaned in a week.  I just don't understand the correlation to asking someone to take off moody boots and the fact that your floors were newly clean or the amount of time you had put in cleaning them.

And based on your last paragraph, are you really asking us to confirm your belief that she was rude? Because you obviously believe you are in the right.

Knitterly

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Re: Rude to tell someone not to walk on freshly washed floor?
« Reply #28 on: January 25, 2013, 09:08:48 AM »
If she lives less than a mile away and had to stop at yours to use the bathroom, any chance she didn't have time to take off her boots?

She would have said so. But either way I would not be too happy to have rescrub the floor because she didn't. If it were that desperate she could have stopped at either the gas station or the donut shop ( Tim Horton's) at the either end of my street and gotten to the bathroom sooner.

Your reference to Tim Horton's indicates you're probably Canadian, is that right?

As another Canadian, I just want to point out that it is generally considered very rude to wear one's outdoor shoes inside during the winter.  Other Canadians on the board (I know there are several of us) can confirm this.

In fact, even if someone is generally fine with guests wearing shoes inside, it is generally considered quite rude to do this in the winter.

So, I really don't think snowdragon was remotely rude by insisting her guest take off her shoes at the door. 

Who were you saving the freshly washed floors for? I get the idea of asking someone to not walk in wet floors because they end up with oot prints.  But if the floor is dry, how long we're you planning on them being a no walk zone? Or is the issue not that the floors were freshly washed but that you didn't want snowy boots in your house.

 Why do I have to justify any of that? Really, this is my home, I just spent a good deal of time cleaning it and someone who does not live here gets to mess it up at will and I have to justify not wanting it messed up and how long I want it remain clean and who I want walking on it?
   People who exhibit common courtesy will be welcome, those who can't will not be.

Sounds like you have already decided that you weren't rude.

Because really, just answering the question in your title, I would say that yes, it is rude to tell someone not to walk on freshly washed floors, assuming the floor was dry. Floors are for walking on, after all, and at some point after washing, they will get dirty again, so making people keep off them completely as a general rule for an unspecified length of time is a bit pointless, and I think, rude to whoever is needing to walk on them.

Your actual question doesn't really have to do with the freshly-washed state of the floors - it has more to do with asking someone to take their wet, dirty shoes off in your house. I suspect that most here would object to someone doing that, regardless of the state of their floors beforehand. I would, and I'm very much a shoes on in the house kind of person.
Thanks, Cake earner, you got to the heart of my questions. 

Snowdragon, not sure about why my question made you feel defensive. If I had cleaned in preparation of a party later in the day then I would be more protective of them staying spotless. And I completely understand not wanting wet moody boots tramped through my house whether they are on freshly washed floors or ones that I hadn't cleaned in a week. I just don't understand the correlation to asking someone to take off moody boots and the fact that your floors were newly clean or the amount of time you had put in cleaning them.

And based on your last paragraph, are you really asking us to confirm your belief that she was rude? Because you obviously believe you are in the right.

I'm not answering for the OP, just stating what my feelings are on the matter... I am less opposed to someone tracking mud/snow/dirt on my floor if it needs to be washed vs tracking mud/snow/dirt on a floor that I have *just* washed.  If I haven't washed my floors in a few days, I am more likely to brush it off knowing that I can just wash my floor when they are done.  But if I have just done it, I get really irritated because I just finished and now I need to do it again?!?!  (Auuuuuugh!!!) 


jaxsue

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Re: Rude to tell someone not to walk on freshly washed floor?
« Reply #29 on: January 25, 2013, 10:01:31 AM »
Knitterly is right about wearing shoes inside, especially during the winter, in Canada. I have both US/Canadian citizenship and have spent considerable time there, so I'm familiar with that. And that was a rule where I grew up, in N MI; you didn't walk on peoples' floors with snowy/muddy boots.

That's why we had "snow porches." it's where you removed your boots.