Hostesses With The Mostest > Entertaining and Hospitality

Having a get-together for a woman who just had triplets

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rachellenore:
Thanks for the advice so far, guys, it's all really helpful! We're in Texas, I'll probably buy some sweet tea and some kind of muffin or some fruit platter, depending on what I find at the store that looks good.

MummySweet:
My best friend has triplets.  They are almost 11 now (time flies)!   Easy food is great.  I remember my friend really appreciated gifts of diapers, good quality wipes, and people who would hold the babies while she went to take a shower.

One thing that was really important to her then, and now, is that people remember that her children are individuals and treat them as such.  Watch for indicators from your friend.  She may be sensitive if she feels that people are treating her children as a curiosity, or as a single unit (The Triplets), rather than as individual babies.  I would discourage any 'matching' gifts unless you know that your friend likes matchy-matchy for the kids. 

bopper:
When people visited me I would say "Bring lunch!". 

Sheila Take a Bow:

--- Quote from: jpcher on January 25, 2013, 06:01:20 PM ---If you see a basket of laundry, ask if you could fold the clothes for her. If there are dishes in the kitchen, by all means ask if you could wash them. Ask if there are other small chores that she would like help with . . . vacuum the nursery, change the babies bedding, small stuff like that.

--- End quote ---

If you go this route, just be careful.  After I had my daughter, I was really sensitive (can I blame the hormones?) and asking too many questions like this would have left me crying and asking if you thought I was a terrible mother who couldn't even manage household chores.  So if you start to feel resistance to offers of help, don't keep offering.  (Or maybe I was just insane.  That's always a possibility.  :))

CakeEater:

--- Quote from: Sheila Take a Bow on January 31, 2013, 01:49:24 PM ---
--- Quote from: jpcher on January 25, 2013, 06:01:20 PM ---If you see a basket of laundry, ask if you could fold the clothes for her. If there are dishes in the kitchen, by all means ask if you could wash them. Ask if there are other small chores that she would like help with . . . vacuum the nursery, change the babies bedding, small stuff like that.

--- End quote ---

If you go this route, just be careful.  After I had my daughter, I was really sensitive (can I blame the hormones?) and asking too many questions like this would have left me crying and asking if you thought I was a terrible mother who couldn't even manage household chores.  So if you start to feel resistance to offers of help, don't keep offering.  (Or maybe I was just insane.  That's always a possibility.  :))

--- End quote ---

Oh gosh yes.  I don't think becasue your host(ess) has a new baby that you shoud start offering to do particular household chores you see undone. Regardless of how tired and awful I felt after baby1, (and I felt really tired and awful), I would not have wanted a work colleague who visited to be folding my underwear, or washing the breakfast dishes.

I think bringing the meal is a great idea, and asking if there's anything you could help with is fine - diving in and pulling sheets off the baby's bed, or asking if you could wash the dishes in the sink wouldn't be welcome by any but the closest friends.

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