Author Topic: Personal Trainer Etiquette.  (Read 2725 times)

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Zilla

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Re: Personal Trainer Etiquette.
« Reply #15 on: February 12, 2013, 07:00:30 AM »
Until they get it right or do what has been suggested, , put the 30 minute timer on your phone.  Every time the trainer stops to talk. to. someone, stop your timer.  Make sure you get what you paid for. 

GrammarNerd

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Re: Personal Trainer Etiquette.
« Reply #16 on: February 12, 2013, 08:45:01 AM »
I think you should write a letter and request/insist on a 5 minute credit to your account for every time the trainer answers a question or helps out another patron.  Even if the assistance doesn't take 5 minutes, you're still thrown out of your routine, and it will take time for you and your trainer to get back on track. 

And about the interruptions and parting comment from that patron about 'putting you in your place?'  It's too bad that you're not still there because I think that would be grounds for calling the manager on duty and telling him/her what was said.  With the repeated interruptions in the 30 minute time span, and then the nasty, confrontational remark, I would file a formal complaint that not only are you worried that this man will continue to interrupt you, but that you're afraid for your personal safety. 

They need to do something.  Would they let the lifeguard on duty give private swimming lessons?  No.  When you pay for a lesson, you should get the full lesson, with the instructor, sans interruptions.

Perhaps if it still continues to happen during the next session, you could do this: Once again, at the beginning, reiterate to the trainer that you want the full 30 minutes, and if anyone asks for assistance, he needs to refer them elsewhere.  Then, if he doesn't and begins to help anyone, walk to the desk/manager, state that apparently this isn't a good time for your trainer as he's working the floor and helping others during your private personal training session.  Tell them that you'll be rescheduling the session and you don't want to be charged for this session.  As they say, vote with your feet.  After they see you do this once, perhaps it will shake them into gear better than the polite requests you've already made.

CLE_Girl

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Re: Personal Trainer Etiquette.
« Reply #17 on: February 12, 2013, 09:14:51 AM »

Today the man who interrupted us three times in the same half hour session told me I was "Rude and selfish and needed to be put in my place."   

Your personal trainer didn't step in? Does your YMCA allow other instances of bullying go un-checked?

It hasn't in a while, but we have had issues with people trying to harass others, I think it happens in most gyms to some extent...this Y had a gentleman who used to watch out for it and keep it in check ( usually it took the form of people  getting on the "fat" girls and making them feel bad, and such, since this gentleman recently died the bullying is rearing up again. )

I am running out this block of prepaid sessions and changing to a closer Y branch, because the facilities are better.

 

Why wait until June?  Call the new Y you want to go to and see if they can transfer your PT sessions.  I've never been to a YMCA but Bally's, Anytime Fitness and Fitworks (local CLE gym) have done this for me or people I know.

WillyNilly

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Re: Personal Trainer Etiquette.
« Reply #18 on: February 12, 2013, 10:33:50 AM »

Today the man who interrupted us three times in the same half hour session told me I was "Rude and selfish and needed to be put in my place."   

Your personal trainer didn't step in? Does your YMCA allow other instances of bullying go un-checked?

It hasn't in a while, but we have had issues with people trying to harass others, I think it happens in most gyms to some extent...this Y had a gentleman who used to watch out for it and keep it in check ( usually it took the form of people  getting on the "fat" girls and making them feel bad, and such, since this gentleman recently died the bullying is rearing up again. )

I am running out this block of prepaid sessions and changing to a closer Y branch, because the facilities are better.

 

Why wait until June?  Call the new Y you want to go to and see if they can transfer your PT sessions.  I've never been to a YMCA but Bally's, Anytime Fitness and Fitworks (local CLE gym) have done this for me or people I know.

Especially since you were threatened by another member, right in front of an employee! You'd think they would want to minimize their liability by just moving you along to a different location.

BeagleMommy

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Re: Personal Trainer Etiquette.
« Reply #19 on: February 12, 2013, 10:47:56 AM »
My gym offers personal training sessions similar to how yours are set up, OP.  However, the trainers work only with one client.  I've seen people come up to them to ask for advice and they've always politely said "I'm in the middle of a private session right now.  If you'd like to wait about 30 minutes I'd be happy to help you".  This is what your trainer should have done.

I would go to the gym manager and tell them what you've said here.

Marcia

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Re: Personal Trainer Etiquette.
« Reply #20 on: February 12, 2013, 01:11:07 PM »
I'm a personal trainer and I would never expect my client to confront a situation like this. Neither myself nor my coworkers leave our personal training clients to go help others (unless, of course, we see something incredible dangerous about to happen).

Once in a while if another gym member is standing near me and looking very confused about something and I can quickly help them (without having to leave my client(s), I'll do that (this usually just involves something like showing them how to move a part of the machine, etc.). But again, this is only if I can just stand where I am, continue to monitor my clients, and what I'm helping with takes about 5 seconds. Still, that situation doesn't even come up that often. Rarely, have I had people come up and interrupt me when I'm with clients.

Your trainer should definitely be the one to confront the other gym members. I'm not sure why he/she finds it so difficult to simply simle to the other member and say "I'm sorry I can't help you now. I'm with a client. I'll be more than happy to help you when I'm finished at X o'clock."

Emmy

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Re: Personal Trainer Etiquette.
« Reply #21 on: February 12, 2013, 01:35:21 PM »
I'd ask for another trainer, one with a spine.  I'm as spineless as they come, but if I were a personal trainer I am pretty sure I'd find it easy enough to say, "Sorry, I'm in a private training session with this client right now, but Other Employee Over There can help you with that."

It seems this trainer is unwilling to stop using your time to assist others and wants you to do her job of telling other clients 'no'.  Answering a question is one thing, but it sounds as if the things your trainer is doing is taking up a large chunk of your time.  If possible, the best thing to do would be to ask for another trainer while explaining the reason you want a switch.  Unless your new trainer is equally spineless, I don't imagine you will have the same problem.  It sounds as if your trainer has a reputation for dropping her client for helping somebody else and people are taking advantage of it.  If management is unwilling to set you up with a new trainer, I think you have the right to ask for your money back because you are not getting what you are paying for.   

I also like the idea of switching gyms earlier if possible.  The management seemed to offer a lack luster response instead of being serious about the problem.  It seems their attitude is 'we heard your complaint, but don't take it seriously'.  As others have said, there are very simple policies that can be put into place that will help ensure that clients are getting all the time they are paying for.  Having trainers and floor staff wear different colored shirts, posting signs, or simply telling trainers they must send those asking for help to the front desk are all simple policies that would reduce the problem.  There should also be policies for protecting clients and staff from rude or abusive behavior from other gym members. 

I train with a trainer under similar circumstances.  Fortunately we do not have the same number of interruptions, but I do find it annoying and brazen when people try to take my trainer's time when he is working with me.  One time somebody wanted him to go back to the computer and schedule an appointment in the middle of my session.  He just told them to go to the front desk or talk to him later when he is not with a client.