Author Topic: Reading/Book Pet Peeves  (Read 230264 times)

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cwm

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Re: Reading/Book Pet Peeves
« Reply #1275 on: September 04, 2013, 01:53:01 PM »
Piratelvr1121, amen !  re conversations where it's hard to tell who is saying what.  When I find myself wanting to get a pencil and annotate each quote with an initial for the perceived speaker, to try to keep track; I'm not far from throwing the book across the room with great force, and never opening it again (or on-screen equivalent)...

A book I got from the library last week was copy-edited in pencil.  In the 'editor's' defense, these were errors that should have never made it to print.  (Mostly incorrect endings on verbs.)  On the other hand, I generally have the ability to read what 'should' be there, by context, rather than what may actually be there (Big help when people text :))  So I found the 'editing' more annoying than the errors.  It broke my reading flow, AND pointed out the errors that I might have skimmed over.

I heartily agree -- writing things in books not one's own property (or otherwise maltreating them) is a bad, bad thing to do.  A sin which I have committed in the past; but one of many of which over the course of time, I have come to repent -- in a few cases, since discovering eHell -- in rather more, just lessons taught by life.

I have a hard enough time writing in my own books, I can't imagine writing in someone else's book (person or public entity). Seriously, it wasn't until my fourth year in college when I realized that yes, I owned these books, and even if I was to sell them back to the school afterwards, it's okay to highlight important points so it's easier to study. Which led to me annotating my LotR when I traveled away from civilization for several months (it was the one book I was allowed to bring). Since coming back, I'm still hesitant to mark books, even when there's something glaringly obvious that I want to correct. It's a quandry.

Well, yes, I've been a very wicked person -- for which I repent in sackcloth and ashes. cwm, I have to wonder where out of the civilised world you went, that LOTR was the only book you were allowed to bring in.  I take it that it couldn't have been Kazakhstan -- wherein, I gather, Mr. Tolkien's works are forbidden.

It was a contracted deal that I go out there for a certain amount of time and live off the land. Weird situation to describe without going into details, but we were each allowed one book. PM me if you want details.

cabbageweevil

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Re: Reading/Book Pet Peeves
« Reply #1276 on: September 04, 2013, 02:05:26 PM »
It also takes a bit of thought to remember that in genre fiction like medievaloid fantasy, you can't use phrases we use every day.  "Run out of steam" -- no steam engines.  "Just a second" -- no clocks; the smallest unit of time is an hour or significant fraction thereof. And so on.

I just read a historical fantasy novel (set in the age of Vikings) that used seconds and I remember wondering about it, it would have been so easy to replace it with moments or something.

Though I can feel such "anachronisms" in historical fiction (real-world, or fantasy) as momentarily jarring, I find I can usually "give them a pass" --  either taking them as purely metaphorical; or as saving the reader possible laborious explanations and / or puzzlement, concerning what would be factually correct for the era in which the book is set.  (I agree, though, that with a medieval or earlier setting, it's perfectly easy to substitute "moments" for "seconds".)

In the only one of Peter Tremayne's "Sister Fidelma" mysteries, set in the seventh century AD, which I have so far read; on a journey in what will later become France, the central characters are discussing ways-and-means with their local guide -- the author has him saying that such-and-such a town is so many kilometres away.  At first, this grated on me; but on reflection, I think it admissible on the author's part.  Less potentially distracting overall, to use a unit of measurement with which the reader is familiar; than to research how distances were described / estimated in France-to-be some fourteen centuries ago, and possibly have to lumber the reader with a weird archaic word which will need to be explained somehow.
But there is a perfectly good period word for distance: mile. (Or cognates thereof.)  And it was used in all parts of Europe that used to be part of the Roman Empire.  It might denote a somewhat different length from place to place, but for story purposes one really doesn't need to accurately measure long distances.  You say that Place A is about two hours ride from Place B, or two days walk, or three days by ship, or whatever.

I rather feel, "two different kinds of reader" -- neither of which, objectively right or wrong. I'm of the kind which gets annoyed and distracted by historical novelists "writing forsoothly", and couching their characters' conversations in the terms of long ago.  Others are annoyed by "modern jargon" being anachronistically brought into times centuries-back.  I being of the former school, people talking of kilometres in six-hundred-and-something AD, doesn't greatly faze me: admit that other, more period-appropriate, references are there for the having -- but for me, it's basically not an issue. Others' mileages / kilometrages / days' walks, will vary.

Elfmama

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Re: Reading/Book Pet Peeves
« Reply #1277 on: September 04, 2013, 02:43:03 PM »
(Even if it's not true: a friend of mine calls this the "medieval 'Tiffany' problem," because while "Tiffany" is an attested name from the 13th century, if you write a historical novel and use it, the reader isn't going to be impressed with your research, they're going to think you made a mistake.)

In multiple cree8ive spellings, too!  Which, if I'm given the slightest bit of encouragement, I can document for you.  ;D
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cwm

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Re: Reading/Book Pet Peeves
« Reply #1278 on: September 04, 2013, 03:01:24 PM »
(Even if it's not true: a friend of mine calls this the "medieval 'Tiffany' problem," because while "Tiffany" is an attested name from the 13th century, if you write a historical novel and use it, the reader isn't going to be impressed with your research, they're going to think you made a mistake.)

In multiple cree8ive spellings, too!  Which, if I'm given the slightest bit of encouragement, I can document for you.  ;D

Can you get me a document for Typhffanyie?

zyrs

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Re: Reading/Book Pet Peeves
« Reply #1279 on: September 04, 2013, 05:10:04 PM »

#6.  Shouldered.  "He shouldered his way into the room."  ...REALLY?????  He SHOULDERED his way into the room?  :P.

Ouch, I can see shouldering his way through a crowd. But into a room?


If I read this, I'd assume he was breaking down the door.

Really? I would assume that there must be people at the door he had to shoulder his way past. Then again this is without context, so...

I would assume he was very frail and so had trouble walking through air pockets.

mrs_deb

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Re: Reading/Book Pet Peeves
« Reply #1280 on: September 04, 2013, 08:40:42 PM »

#6.  Shouldered.  "He shouldered his way into the room."  ...REALLY?????  He SHOULDERED his way into the room?  :P.

Ouch, I can see shouldering his way through a crowd. But into a room?


If I read this, I'd assume he was breaking down the door.

Really? I would assume that there must be people at the door he had to shoulder his way past. Then again this is without context, so...

I would assume he was very frail and so had trouble walking through air pockets.

You guys are killing me :-).

I already returned the e-book to the library, and some other poor sucker romance reader has checked it out, so I can't give you the exact quote today, but I put a hold on the book so when s/he returns it, I'll get it back :-).

To the best of my knowledge there was nobody blocking his way, the room wasn't full, etc.  It's just his manly way of walking, I guess.

lady_disdain

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Re: Reading/Book Pet Peeves
« Reply #1281 on: September 04, 2013, 09:12:03 PM »
And now I see him turning sideways and going into the room shoulder first. :D

Jocelyn

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Re: Reading/Book Pet Peeves
« Reply #1282 on: September 04, 2013, 09:37:48 PM »

#6.  Shouldered.  "He shouldered his way into the room."  ...REALLY?????  He SHOULDERED his way into the room?  :P.

'As he shouldered his way into the room, a nearby referee shouted, 'CLIPPING!'

Jocelyn

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Re: Reading/Book Pet Peeves
« Reply #1283 on: September 04, 2013, 09:41:12 PM »
I was reading Eddings again (the Elenium) and I just realized that he never named Queen Elahna's mother. Every character refers to her as "Queen Elahna's mother", even though the woman had been their queen before her death. Talk about weird!

No I think she's mentioned by name in one place. They're talking about Aldreas and Arissa and mention her by name.

I better keep reading then!

You know, that actually makes it even worse. If she has a name why would everyone from the hooker to the knight always call her Ehlana's mother. It is kind of driving me crazy.
Because the author remembered he'd named her, forgot WHAT he'd named her, and was too lazy to look it up.
 ::)

Jocelyn

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Re: Reading/Book Pet Peeves
« Reply #1284 on: September 04, 2013, 09:45:16 PM »


This conversation reminds me of His Girl Friday.  Walter (Cary Grant) is trying to sabotage his ex-wife's engagement and sends this blonde bombshell to pick up Hildy's (the ex-wife) fiance.  When trying to describe him, Walter says, "He looks like that fellow in the movies - what’s his name, Ralph Bellamy!"

Ralph Bellamy actually played the fiance. :D
Reminds me of my all-time favorite NCIS quote. Someone wonders aloud what Dr. Mallard looked like as a young man, and Gibbs replies, 'Illya Kuryakin'.


(for those who don't remember, actor David McCallum played both roles).

VorFemme

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Re: Reading/Book Pet Peeves
« Reply #1285 on: September 04, 2013, 10:06:58 PM »


This conversation reminds me of His Girl Friday.  Walter (Cary Grant) is trying to sabotage his ex-wife's engagement and sends this blonde bombshell to pick up Hildy's (the ex-wife) fiance.  When trying to describe him, Walter says, "He looks like that fellow in the movies - what’s his name, Ralph Bellamy!"

Ralph Bellamy actually played the fiance. :D
Reminds me of my all-time favorite NCIS quote. Someone wonders aloud what Dr. Mallard looked like as a young man, and Gibbs replies, 'Illya Kuryakin'.


(for those who don't remember, actor David McCallum played both roles).

VorGuy was out of the States with his dad being military - he had no idea what the reference was about.  We lived in a rural area with little signal (this was B.C. - before cable tv) - I had seen Man From U.N.C.L.E. maybe four times when visiting houses with better antennas or in the city with more stations broadcasting....I caught the reference, but looked up a couple of stills from the show.
Let sleeping dragons be.......morning breath......need I say more?

Jocelyn

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Re: Reading/Book Pet Peeves
« Reply #1286 on: September 04, 2013, 11:09:43 PM »


This conversation reminds me of His Girl Friday.  Walter (Cary Grant) is trying to sabotage his ex-wife's engagement and sends this blonde bombshell to pick up Hildy's (the ex-wife) fiance.  When trying to describe him, Walter says, "He looks like that fellow in the movies - what’s his name, Ralph Bellamy!"

Ralph Bellamy actually played the fiance. :D
Reminds me of my all-time favorite NCIS quote. Someone wonders aloud what Dr. Mallard looked like as a young man, and Gibbs replies, 'Illya Kuryakin'.


(for those who don't remember, actor David McCallum played both roles).

VorGuy was out of the States with his dad being military - he had no idea what the reference was about.  We lived in a rural area with little signal (this was B.C. - before cable tv) - I had seen Man From U.N.C.L.E. maybe four times when visiting houses with better antennas or in the city with more stations broadcasting....I caught the reference, but looked up a couple of stills from the show.
It's not many actors whose most famous roles are as a sex symbol,  and as an eccentric but kindly elderly man. :)

cabbageweevil

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Re: Reading/Book Pet Peeves
« Reply #1287 on: September 05, 2013, 12:07:46 AM »



I have a hard enough time writing in my own books, I can't imagine writing in someone else's book (person or public entity). Seriously, it wasn't until my fourth year in college when I realized that yes, I owned these books, and even if I was to sell them back to the school afterwards, it's okay to highlight important points so it's easier to study. Which led to me annotating my LotR when I traveled away from civilization for several months (it was the one book I was allowed to bring). Since coming back, I'm still hesitant to mark books, even when there's something glaringly obvious that I want to correct. It's a quandry.

Well, yes, I've been a very wicked person -- for which I repent in sackcloth and ashes. cwm, I have to wonder where out of the civilised world you went, that LOTR was the only book you were allowed to bring in.  I take it that it couldn't have been Kazakhstan -- wherein, I gather, Mr. Tolkien's works are forbidden.

It was a contracted deal that I go out there for a certain amount of time and live off the land. Weird situation to describe without going into details, but we were each allowed one book. PM me if you want details.

Thanks, but "enough" -- I won't bug you for details. (And, sorry for butchering the quote-tree; but hopefully, "who said what" will be discernable).

Queen of Clubs

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Re: Reading/Book Pet Peeves
« Reply #1288 on: September 05, 2013, 07:43:33 AM »
Reminds me of my all-time favorite NCIS quote. Someone wonders aloud what Dr. Mallard looked like as a young man, and Gibbs replies, 'Illya Kuryakin'.


(for those who don't remember, actor David McCallum played both roles).

I loved that bit in NCIS.  It was just so funny.

But it's quite hard to find well written fanfiction and often it just gives me a headache.   My biggest pet peeves:

1. Wall O' Text.  Did no one teach these people paragraph structure? Or some do use paragraphs *and I use that term loosely*, but poorly.  It's like they realize it's a Wall O' Text and break it down into Bricks O' Text.  The way I learned to write, you start a new paragraph when a new person speaks.  Or if one person is telling a long story and you need to use paragraphs within the quote, start a new paragraph with quotation marks to show they're still speaking.

I hate the wall of text, especially when the writer has no idea that new person talking = new paragraph.  I backbutton out of there so quickly.

The 'best' wall of text story I saw was one long paragraph written in text speak, which ended with "LOLZ!!!"  Oddly enough, the story had no reviews at all.  Can't understand why.

Another fanfic pet peeve is when the author can't spell the characters' names.

lady_disdain

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Re: Reading/Book Pet Peeves
« Reply #1289 on: September 05, 2013, 09:11:29 AM »
Saramago just loooves a wall of text. His sentences can go on for 5 or 6 lines, his paragraphs can reach 2 pages. He rambles on and on and on... His stories and characters are often fascinating but buried under all that. Personally, I can't read him, no matter how much I want to (except for a couple of shorter works).

The guy even won a Nobel prize.