Author Topic: Reading/Book Pet Peeves  (Read 221297 times)

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lady_disdain

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Re: Reading/Book Pet Peeves
« Reply #1815 on: March 11, 2014, 08:53:54 AM »
Anne has an advantage over Charlotte: her mother's friend, Lady Russel. Lady Russel would happily take Anne in and, most likely, provide for her in her will. Lady Russel probably has the right to will her own marriage portion and she has no children.

This is true.  Unless Lady Russel dies first, and her property passes to a male nephew rather than to Anne.

It just goes to show how precarious all of their positions are.

Even Anne's friend, the widow (Mrs. Smith?) did everything right -- went to private school, married a rich upper-class man, lived in high society.  Except her husband squandered all his money and died, and now she lives in ill health and poverty.

Everything was so tenuous in those days, and the sad thing was how few options people had to change their circumstances.  They couldn't just go get a 2nd job, move and buy land elsewhere, or any of the normal options today.

In most Regency marriage contracts, the women received a settlement. This was money that the husband held for his wife, with several restrictions on how it could be used. However, if he died, it reverted to the wife, not the heirs.  In Pride and Prejudice, Mrs Bennet has a five thousand settlement, which would go to her daughters, not Mr Collin, when she died. It was specified in Lydia's marriage contract that she would receive her share of this (her mother could not disinherit her - as though Mrs Bennet would cut off her darling married daughter!).

So Lady Russel most likely has money of her own, from her marriage contract. Her husband's estate was most likely already inherited by his heirs when he died and she lives quite genteelly on her marriage portion. Since she doesn't have children, I imagine the main estate was inherited by one of those pesky cousins that show up on such time, who would be less inclined to give financial support to Lady Russel than her own children might.

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Re: Reading/Book Pet Peeves
« Reply #1816 on: March 11, 2014, 08:59:28 AM »
I've been reading a lot of free and $1 books on my Kindle lately.  There's that old adage 'You get what you pay for'.  I expect the editing to be not so great but it is so jarring when there is an extra word or a missing word or the wrong word (her rather than his, for example).  But the absolute worst is when they use the wrong name.  Sometimes, they've just mixed up some character names but sometimes it is a different name altogether and I'm left trying to figure out, 'Who the heck is that?!?!?'

I'd like to volunteer to be an editor for some of these fly-by-night outfits.  Give me all the stories for free and I'll send them back to you with corrections!

I'm not a professional editor but I can spell and know basic grammar and I can keep track of who's who!
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Re: Reading/Book Pet Peeves
« Reply #1817 on: March 11, 2014, 09:25:12 AM »
Anne has an advantage over Charlotte: her mother's friend, Lady Russel. Lady Russel would happily take Anne in and, most likely, provide for her in her will. Lady Russel probably has the right to will her own marriage portion and she has no children.

This is true.  Unless Lady Russel dies first, and her property passes to a male nephew rather than to Anne.

It just goes to show how precarious all of their positions are.

Even Anne's friend, the widow (Mrs. Smith?) did everything right -- went to private school, married a rich upper-class man, lived in high society.  Except her husband squandered all his money and died, and now she lives in ill health and poverty.

Everything was so tenuous in those days, and the sad thing was how few options people had to change their circumstances.  They couldn't just go get a 2nd job, move and buy land elsewhere, or any of the normal options today.

In most Regency marriage contracts, the women received a settlement. This was money that the husband held for his wife, with several restrictions on how it could be used. However, if he died, it reverted to the wife, not the heirs.  In Pride and Prejudice, Mrs Bennet has a five thousand settlement, which would go to her daughters, not Mr Collin, when she died. It was specified in Lydia's marriage contract that she would receive her share of this (her mother could not disinherit her - as though Mrs Bennet would cut off her darling married daughter!).

So Lady Russel most likely has money of her own, from her marriage contract. Her husband's estate was most likely already inherited by his heirs when he died and she lives quite genteelly on her marriage portion. Since she doesn't have children, I imagine the main estate was inherited by one of those pesky cousins that show up on such time, who would be less inclined to give financial support to Lady Russel than her own children might.

This is also the reason why elopement was such a bad idea - on marriage, anything a woman owned became the property of her husband and he had control over it. A settlement could ensure that her 'portion', or assets which she had previously owned, could be held in trust for her and her children / heirs, which would give her some protection in the event that her husband turned out to be bad with money, or if he died. If you eloped, or married clandestinely, there was no settlement and this left the woman, and her children, potentially very vulnerable. 

Lydia Bennet was very fortunate that between Mr Darcy and Mr Gardiner, a settlement was made before she actually married Mr Wickham - in all probablity, it would have meant that the share of the capital settled her would be held in trust, and she (and therefore Mr Wickham) would only be able to get hold of the income, and unable to touch the capital, so she would never be completely destitute.

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Re: Reading/Book Pet Peeves
« Reply #1818 on: March 11, 2014, 11:00:41 AM »
I've been reading a lot of free and $1 books on my Kindle lately.  There's that old adage 'You get what you pay for'.  I expect the editing to be not so great but it is so jarring when there is an extra word or a missing word or the wrong word (her rather than his, for example).  But the absolute worst is when they use the wrong name.  Sometimes, they've just mixed up some character names but sometimes it is a different name altogether and I'm left trying to figure out, 'Who the heck is that?!?!?'

I'd like to volunteer to be an editor for some of these fly-by-night outfits.  Give me all the stories for free and I'll send them back to you with corrections!

I'm not a professional editor but I can spell and know basic grammar and I can keep track of who's who!

I have had mixed results with the cheap ones. A free one, I couldn't finish because the heroine was such a Mary Sue. Another free one was so good, I was horrified to discover the book to which it was a prequel was not available electronically. For $1.99 you can get The Shambling Guide to New York City. Loved it, and bought the full price sequel without any qualms at all. I have also bought a cheap one which, while readable, was apparently completely mislabeled, since both the title and synopsis described a completely different story.
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Re: Reading/Book Pet Peeves
« Reply #1819 on: March 11, 2014, 05:07:00 PM »
I agree that part of the big difference between Elizabeth's situation and Charlotte's was age, 20 versus 27.  Also, there's Elizabeth's beauty and Charlotte's lack thereof. 

Agree completely with the above.  Also, when Elizabeth turned down Mr. Collins, she didn't think he'd go running straight to Charlotte!  No one did.  If anything, she might have thought Mr. Collins would turn to Mary, who was next in line due to Mr. Collins' criteria of choosing his fiance solely due to birth order -- and Mary would have accepted him.

I think Mary and Mr. Collins would have been well-suited to each other - disastrously so, in fact.  I think Mary would have encouraged the worst side of him and thought she was right to do so.  Charlotte, for all that she wasn't in love with Mr. Collins (or even loved him at all), was far more sensible and down to earth than Mary and was probably a far better wife to him than Mary ever could have been.

I wonder what happened to Mary after her parents died.  I should think Kitty would be able to find a husband, but I don't know about Mary.  At least Lizzie and Jane would make sure she was secure although Mary would hate being the poor relative (and I don't blame her for that at all).

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Re: Reading/Book Pet Peeves
« Reply #1820 on: March 11, 2014, 07:52:03 PM »
Mary wed one of her uncle Edward Gardiner's law clerks and moved to Meryton with him.
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Re: Reading/Book Pet Peeves
« Reply #1821 on: March 11, 2014, 08:33:32 PM »
Mary wed one of her uncle Edward Gardiner's law clerks and moved to Meryton with him.

It was Uncle Phillips' clerk. (He's the one who lived in Meryton. Mr. Gardiner was in trade and lived in London).

This is spelled out in a memoir one of her nephews wrote about her. He also mentions Kitty marries a clergyman near Pemberley.

lady_disdain

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Re: Reading/Book Pet Peeves
« Reply #1822 on: March 11, 2014, 10:14:21 PM »
I agree that part of the big difference between Elizabeth's situation and Charlotte's was age, 20 versus 27.  Also, there's Elizabeth's beauty and Charlotte's lack thereof. 

Agree completely with the above.  Also, when Elizabeth turned down Mr. Collins, she didn't think he'd go running straight to Charlotte!  No one did.  If anything, she might have thought Mr. Collins would turn to Mary, who was next in line due to Mr. Collins' criteria of choosing his fiance solely due to birth order -- and Mary would have accepted him.

I think Mary and Mr. Collins would have been well-suited to each other - disastrously so, in fact.  I think Mary would have encouraged the worst side of him and thought she was right to do so.  Charlotte, for all that she wasn't in love with Mr. Collins (or even loved him at all), was far more sensible and down to earth than Mary and was probably a far better wife to him than Mary ever could have been.

I wonder what happened to Mary after her parents died.  I should think Kitty would be able to find a husband, but I don't know about Mary.  At least Lizzie and Jane would make sure she was secure although Mary would hate being the poor relative (and I don't blame her for that at all).

Yes, I thought Mary was the sister most suited to Mr Collins (in a sad way) and most likely to accept him. And, after Mr Collins inherited, I can just see her passing out judgement in all of the local society.

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Re: Reading/Book Pet Peeves
« Reply #1823 on: March 12, 2014, 12:08:43 AM »
I've been reading a lot of free and $1 books on my Kindle lately.  There's that old adage 'You get what you pay for'.  I expect the editing to be not so great but it is so jarring when there is an extra word or a missing word or the wrong word (her rather than his, for example).  But the absolute worst is when they use the wrong name.  Sometimes, they've just mixed up some character names but sometimes it is a different name altogether and I'm left trying to figure out, 'Who the heck is that?!?!?'

I'd like to volunteer to be an editor for some of these fly-by-night outfits.  Give me all the stories for free and I'll send them back to you with corrections!

I'm not a professional editor but I can spell and know basic grammar and I can keep track of who's who!

I have had mixed results with the cheap ones. A free one, I couldn't finish because the heroine was such a Mary Sue. Another free one was so good, I was horrified to discover the book to which it was a prequel was not available electronically. For $1.99 you can get The Shambling Guide to New York City. Loved it, and bought the full price sequel without any qualms at all. I have also bought a cheap one which, while readable, was apparently completely mislabeled, since both the title and synopsis described a completely different story.

A lot of excellent authors have made the decision to price their books low or make them available for free because we're having to compete with a sea of free and cheap books. Some of those books are dire, yes... including some released by traditional publishers. Some are excellent... including some that are self-published.

lady_disdain

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Re: Reading/Book Pet Peeves
« Reply #1824 on: March 12, 2014, 12:25:59 AM »
Do you expect us to take that on your say so, Petticoat? Citation (examples) needed!

:D I always want book recommendations. Specially free or inexpensive.

Ereine

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Re: Reading/Book Pet Peeves
« Reply #1825 on: March 12, 2014, 01:12:26 AM »
I think that free (or very cheap) books can be excellent advertising. There are some authors whose free books have made me buy four or five of their other books (Courtney Milan, though I was familiar with her name before, Jessica Clare, Rosalind James, Elisabeth Naughton, I don't think that all of them have free books all the time) but to find them I've had to read a lot of bad books (or start reading them).

lady_disdain

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Re: Reading/Book Pet Peeves
« Reply #1826 on: March 12, 2014, 01:16:39 AM »
That is the concept behind Baen's free library, as well, for those who like science fiction and fantasy.

Petticoats

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Re: Reading/Book Pet Peeves
« Reply #1827 on: March 12, 2014, 08:51:34 AM »
Do you expect us to take that on your say so, Petticoat? Citation (examples) needed!

:D I always want book recommendations. Specially free or inexpensive.

LOL! There are lots out there... in fact, I was looking for some specific examples by good authors for you and I fell into Amazon browsing and lost a chunk of time there.  :)

I get lots of great recommendations through Bookbub (bookbub.com) and E-reader News Today (ereadernewstoday.com). I've signed up for their daily email newsletters, and although there's no guarantee that they don't sometimes include dreck, they also have some really good titles. (Bookbub, at least, looks at a book's reviews before deciding whether to accept an author's submission.)

And if you like YA paranormal romance on the less gritty side, there's this particular free gem, which I have a soft spot for.  ;)  http://www.amazon.com/The-Shadow-Rose-Grove-Chronicles-ebook/dp/B009YO4GT4

I have to admit--to return to the thread--that I tend to be tougher on books that I got for free or at a discount. I know what a double standard that is, but I really have to fight against an impulse to be hyper-critical and hard to please (an impulse already present because of all my years as an editor). I think it's probably a widespread phenomenon, actually, because a lot of writers I know have said that the reviews they get after running a free promotion on a book are a lot harsher than in general.

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Re: Reading/Book Pet Peeves
« Reply #1828 on: March 12, 2014, 01:19:42 PM »
Mary wed one of her uncle Edward Gardiner's law clerks and moved to Meryton with him.

It was Uncle Phillips' clerk. (He's the one who lived in Meryton. Mr. Gardiner was in trade and lived in London).

This is spelled out in a memoir one of her nephews wrote about her. He also mentions Kitty marries a clergyman near Pemberley.

Thanks, both of you, for the info.  That's (hopefully) a happier life than I expected for Mary.  Just to clarify though, whose nephew?  Mary's?  If so, who wrote the memoir and do you have a link?  I've read pretty much all of Jane Austen's work that's available and I don't remember coming across that.

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Re: Reading/Book Pet Peeves
« Reply #1829 on: March 12, 2014, 01:21:47 PM »
Yes, I thought Mary was the sister most suited to Mr Collins (in a sad way) and most likely to accept him. And, after Mr Collins inherited, I can just see her passing out judgement in all of the local society.

Oh, Lord, yes - she would have been awful.  I feel sorry for Mary but she really needed someone to encourage the better side of her character, and Mr. Collins could never have done that.