Author Topic: Reading/Book Pet Peeves  (Read 243786 times)

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amandaelizabeth

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Re: Reading/Book Pet Peeves
« Reply #1980 on: April 23, 2014, 06:50:40 PM »
I am listening to this book, not reading it, but I think that I would be just as peeved if I were indeed reading it.  The writer keeps mentioning what the time is.  Fair enough but she will say it was 9 o'clock am.  Which is okay if there were doubts about whether or not it is morning or evening.  'Breakfast was at 9 o'clock am, an hour later at 10 o'clock am she went .........'

or 'after a long walk in the afternoon dinner was at 7 o'clock pm'

I can also remember that the heroine is petit with green eyes, and do not need to be reminded every time.


jmarvellous

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Re: Reading/Book Pet Peeves
« Reply #1981 on: April 23, 2014, 07:11:00 PM »
I am listening to this book, not reading it, but I think that I would be just as peeved if I were indeed reading it.  The writer keeps mentioning what the time is.  Fair enough but she will say it was 9 o'clock am.  Which is okay if there were doubts about whether or not it is morning or evening.  'Breakfast was at 9 o'clock am, an hour later at 10 o'clock am she went .........'

or 'after a long walk in the afternoon dinner was at 7 o'clock pm'

I can also remember that the heroine is petit with green eyes, and do not need to be reminded every time.

How annoying!

The book I'm editing says "He looked at his pocket watch and saw that it was 10 o'clock in the morning" instead of saying "at mid-morning" or something. Every time.

Also, when something happens, a character turns to look at it first, almost every time. Just say it happened, darn it! I guess it's nice that someone saw it, but if it doesn't turn the plot, let it go.

Final rant in a similar vein: When the character has a special possession or memory that doesn't have significance to the plot, but they keep mentioning it/turning to it in their idle thoughts. I actually like allusions to famous literature, but reminding the reader every 10 pages that your character really likes "Crime & Punishment," let's say, when your tale has nothing to do with murder or internal conflict or Russia or even poverty ... is pointless.

shadowfox79

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Re: Reading/Book Pet Peeves
« Reply #1982 on: April 24, 2014, 05:18:01 AM »
I remember one story that wound me up because the author was obsessed with food.

I don't mind describing what people are eating as background, but every single meal had a lengthy description of the food with expressions like "crispy homemade chips" and "rich creamery butter". On one occasion someone bit into a sandwich and exclaimed "Black Forest ham, real Cheddar cheese and Dijon mustard!" Oh come on, really?

Winterlight

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Re: Reading/Book Pet Peeves
« Reply #1983 on: April 24, 2014, 02:09:15 PM »
I love foodie books but that would get on my nerves.
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Petticoats

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Re: Reading/Book Pet Peeves
« Reply #1984 on: April 24, 2014, 02:49:04 PM »

One of the criticisms of the Twilight novels is the underuse of said, not sure how true it is.

The problem with the dialogue tags in Twilight isn't so much that one particular tag ("said") is underused. It's that the editor let Meyer use words as speaking verbs that are not speaking verbs, and even complete sentences as dialogue tags, which simply doesn't work.

I can't remember exact examples, but the patterns I saw were like this:

"Just stand there," she closed the door.

"Just stand there," she gazed.

Allyson

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Re: Reading/Book Pet Peeves
« Reply #1985 on: April 24, 2014, 03:29:46 PM »
Having characters with levels of competence that are vastly different from what they should be, based on what we know of the character. I find this happens a lot with female characters, in one of two forms.

a) a woman who's never had any kind of fight training/experience, suddenly insists on being included in dangerous situations, in order to make an "action girl" scenario happen. I understand wanting to avoid the damsel in distress cliches, but sometimes it's just silly.

or

b) a woman who's a police officer/military etc, really should be competent, constantly getting kidnapped and needing to be rescued. It's insulting.

I feel like both these are trying to have it both ways, and also often only having 1 woman in a whole series so they have to put every single trait on her. instead of having your rescue plot happen to, say, a kindergarten teacher (and she can be awesome in other, non-combat ways) and the female police officer being the one to beat the bad guys. Or, maybe they are trying to be subversive only these things are now so common as to be predictable...

Slartibartfast

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Re: Reading/Book Pet Peeves
« Reply #1986 on: April 24, 2014, 05:01:32 PM »

One of the criticisms of the Twilight novels is the underuse of said, not sure how true it is.

The problem with the dialogue tags in Twilight isn't so much that one particular tag ("said") is underused. It's that the editor let Meyer use words as speaking verbs that are not speaking verbs, and even complete sentences as dialogue tags, which simply doesn't work.

I can't remember exact examples, but the patterns I saw were like this:

"Just stand there," she closed the door.

"Just stand there," she gazed.

This is part of why I still stand by two spaces after a sentence, even though it's not technically right.  I like to know the difference between

"What did I do?"  John sighed.

and

"What did I do?" John sighed.


Also makes it very clear in situations like . . .

"What did she say about him?" Carol sneezed.

. . . that those are indeed two separate actions and no, I'm not trying to have Carol sneeze an entire sentence  :-\

Piratelvr1121

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Re: Reading/Book Pet Peeves
« Reply #1987 on: April 24, 2014, 05:06:35 PM »
One of my pet peeves is when you're told "So and so has this quality" but they never actually exhibit said quality. 

Ex: So and so was one of the nicest, most caring and empathic people on the earth!  And two paragraphs later we read:

Ugh, she's been on my couch crying into her ice cream about her dead cat and I have to go on this date in 2 minutes and boy is she an ugly crier.  Feeling awkward, I toss my extra key at her and say 'Well look, I've gotta go, you can stay over and help yourself to anything in the fridge, kay? By the way, how do I look for my date?"
Beyond a wholesome discipline, be gentle with yourself. You are a child of the universe, no less than the trees and the stars.  You have a right to be here. Be cheerful, strive to be happy. -Desiderata

Mental Magpie

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Re: Reading/Book Pet Peeves
« Reply #1988 on: April 24, 2014, 06:47:14 PM »

One of the criticisms of the Twilight novels is the underuse of said, not sure how true it is.

The problem with the dialogue tags in Twilight isn't so much that one particular tag ("said") is underused. It's that the editor let Meyer use words as speaking verbs that are not speaking verbs, and even complete sentences as dialogue tags, which simply doesn't work.

I can't remember exact examples, but the patterns I saw were like this:

"Just stand there," she closed the door.

"Just stand there," she gazed.

I don't understand what's wrong with the first one.  To me it says that she said "Just stand there" as she closed the door.
The problem with choosing the lesser of two evils is that you're still choosing evil.

violinp

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Re: Reading/Book Pet Peeves
« Reply #1989 on: April 24, 2014, 06:54:10 PM »

One of the criticisms of the Twilight novels is the underuse of said, not sure how true it is.

The problem with the dialogue tags in Twilight isn't so much that one particular tag ("said") is underused. It's that the editor let Meyer use words as speaking verbs that are not speaking verbs, and even complete sentences as dialogue tags, which simply doesn't work.

I can't remember exact examples, but the patterns I saw were like this:

"Just stand there," she closed the door.

"Just stand there," she gazed.

I don't understand what's wrong with the first one.  To me it says that she said "Just stand there" as she closed the door.

The thing is that you need "she said as" because "closed the door" is not a speech tag like "she said" or "she uttered" or whatever word - making word you want to use.
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Slartibartfast

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Re: Reading/Book Pet Peeves
« Reply #1990 on: April 24, 2014, 07:38:46 PM »

One of the criticisms of the Twilight novels is the underuse of said, not sure how true it is.

The problem with the dialogue tags in Twilight isn't so much that one particular tag ("said") is underused. It's that the editor let Meyer use words as speaking verbs that are not speaking verbs, and even complete sentences as dialogue tags, which simply doesn't work.

I can't remember exact examples, but the patterns I saw were like this:

"Just stand there," she closed the door.

"Just stand there," she gazed.

I don't understand what's wrong with the first one.  To me it says that she said "Just stand there" as she closed the door.

The thing is that you need "she said as" because "closed the door" is not a speech tag like "she said" or "she uttered" or whatever word - making word you want to use.

Yep, you'd have to say

"Just stand there," she said as she closed the door.

or

"Just stand there."  She closed the door.

(The former implies both things happened at the same time; the latter implies she spoke first and then moved.  The original just implies that the writer doesn't understand nuance.)

Mental Magpie

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Re: Reading/Book Pet Peeves
« Reply #1991 on: April 24, 2014, 07:46:21 PM »

One of the criticisms of the Twilight novels is the underuse of said, not sure how true it is.

The problem with the dialogue tags in Twilight isn't so much that one particular tag ("said") is underused. It's that the editor let Meyer use words as speaking verbs that are not speaking verbs, and even complete sentences as dialogue tags, which simply doesn't work.

I can't remember exact examples, but the patterns I saw were like this:

"Just stand there," she closed the door.

"Just stand there," she gazed.

I don't understand what's wrong with the first one.  To me it says that she said "Just stand there" as she closed the door.

The thing is that you need "she said as" because "closed the door" is not a speech tag like "she said" or "she uttered" or whatever word - making word you want to use.

Yep, you'd have to say

"Just stand there," she said as she closed the door.

or

"Just stand there."  She closed the door.

(The former implies both things happened at the same time; the latter implies she spoke first and then moved.  The original just implies that the writer doesn't understand nuance.)

I agree that the last one implies she spoke first then moved.  However, I don't understand/agree that you need "she said as".  The quotes make it clear she was speaking, I don't really need the extra words to figure it out.
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Two Ravens

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Re: Reading/Book Pet Peeves
« Reply #1992 on: April 24, 2014, 08:46:38 PM »

One of the criticisms of the Twilight novels is the underuse of said, not sure how true it is.

The problem with the dialogue tags in Twilight isn't so much that one particular tag ("said") is underused. It's that the editor let Meyer use words as speaking verbs that are not speaking verbs, and even complete sentences as dialogue tags, which simply doesn't work.

I can't remember exact examples, but the patterns I saw were like this:

"Just stand there," she closed the door.

"Just stand there," she gazed.

I don't understand what's wrong with the first one.  To me it says that she said "Just stand there" as she closed the door.

The thing is that you need "she said as" because "closed the door" is not a speech tag like "she said" or "she uttered" or whatever word - making word you want to use.

Yep, you'd have to say

"Just stand there," she said as she closed the door.

or

"Just stand there."  She closed the door.

(The former implies both things happened at the same time; the latter implies she spoke first and then moved.  The original just implies that the writer doesn't understand nuance.)

I agree that the last one implies she spoke first then moved.  However, I don't understand/agree that you need "she said as".  The quotes make it clear she was speaking, I don't really need the extra words to figure it out.

It's grammatically incorrect. "She closed the door" is not a dialogue tag, so it shouldn't be used in conjunction with a comma.

Mental Magpie

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Re: Reading/Book Pet Peeves
« Reply #1993 on: April 24, 2014, 08:48:09 PM »
I understand that.  I don't understand why not.  The rule doesn't make sense to me.
The problem with choosing the lesser of two evils is that you're still choosing evil.

Katana_Geldar

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Re: Reading/Book Pet Peeves
« Reply #1994 on: April 24, 2014, 08:52:01 PM »
Because you have two separate sentences with the second one.