A Civil World. Off-topic discussions on a variety of topics. > Time For a Coffee Break!

Reading/Book Pet Peeves

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cabbageweevil:
I've enjoyed a good many of Philippa Gregory's novels, and consider that she writes well; but have started to eschew her in recent years. She seems to produce exclusively nowadays, an endless torrent of novels about British royal women from a fairly limited period. I would seem to have a more restricted appetite for queens, than many have -- I've just got sick of 'em.

She just seems to mechanistically go on and on, milking this seemingly unceasing cash-cow. I find myself wanting to shout, "For pity's sake, Philippa, make a change !  Write about something totally else, even if you make a hash of it !  How about medieval Russia, with Kievan Rus' and the Mongol threat; or the Incas; or China or Japan, very long ago -- anything, so long as it's different..."

Redsoil:
When an established author, describing how she gets ideas for her books notes that the process is something like "a rolling stone gathering moss".

Really???

Nevertheless, I'm somewhat peeved that her latest book doesn't seem to be available on Kindle.  Hardcover is on Amazon for pre-order at present.

Seraphia:

--- Quote from: cabbageweevil on February 13, 2013, 08:13:07 AM ---I've enjoyed a good many of Philippa Gregory's novels, and consider that she writes well; but have started to eschew her in recent years. She seems to produce exclusively nowadays, an endless torrent of novels about British royal women from a fairly limited period. I would seem to have a more restricted appetite for queens, than many have -- I've just got sick of 'em.

She just seems to mechanistically go on and on, milking this seemingly unceasing cash-cow. I find myself wanting to shout, "For pity's sake, Philippa, make a change !  Write about something totally else, even if you make a hash of it !  How about medieval Russia, with Kievan Rus' and the Mongol threat; or the Incas; or China or Japan, very long ago -- anything, so long as it's different..."

--- End quote ---

You know, I feel the same way. I love me some Tudors, I really do. But I think I've had my fill of overly-tragic queens/princesses/noblewomen with intimate scenes on boats. And while I appreciate the difficulty of researching a new history or culture, if I'm going to read a story that borrows a bunch of stuff from her other books, I'd really like a new setting.

Outdoor Girl:
A pet peeve for me is some electronic book prices.  You want me to pay more for an electronic book than what I would pay if I went to the book store and bought the paperback?  I don't think so.

BabyMama:

--- Quote from: Seraphia on February 13, 2013, 09:26:39 AM ---
--- Quote from: cabbageweevil on February 13, 2013, 08:13:07 AM ---I've enjoyed a good many of Philippa Gregory's novels, and consider that she writes well; but have started to eschew her in recent years. She seems to produce exclusively nowadays, an endless torrent of novels about British royal women from a fairly limited period. I would seem to have a more restricted appetite for queens, than many have -- I've just got sick of 'em.

She just seems to mechanistically go on and on, milking this seemingly unceasing cash-cow. I find myself wanting to shout, "For pity's sake, Philippa, make a change !  Write about something totally else, even if you make a hash of it !  How about medieval Russia, with Kievan Rus' and the Mongol threat; or the Incas; or China or Japan, very long ago -- anything, so long as it's different..."

--- End quote ---

You know, I feel the same way. I love me some Tudors, I really do. But I think I've had my fill of overly-tragic queens/princesses/noblewomen with intimate scenes on boats. And while I appreciate the difficulty of researching a new history or culture, if I'm going to read a story that borrows a bunch of stuff from her other books, I'd really like a new setting.

--- End quote ---

They've become pretty formulaic, too. When the character meets a dashing man, I no longer wonder if it's going to work out between them, because it totally is. Beginning of book: Young, naive character describes the court setting around them. Middle of book: That character becomes embroiled in that court setting, usually part of a plot hatched by family members. Character also meets man, true love ensues, usually marriage is impossible for some reason or another. Sometimes they do get to marry but most of their love is described as passionate physical love. End: Not good for the main character.

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