Author Topic: Reading/Book Pet Peeves  (Read 254951 times)

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Calistoga

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Re: Reading/Book Pet Peeves
« Reply #660 on: April 12, 2013, 11:25:13 AM »
I'm re-reading A Song of Ice and Fire for the gazillionth time today and it made me think of this thread (someone mentioned George RR Martin's discovery of "tummy" bugged them.) Wait until he discovers "wroth" and "nuncle." People in A Dance With Dragons are wroth over everything. :P

I'm reading a Dance with Dragons right now and...yes. People are wroth and have wroth. You can always tell when he finds a new name/word.

In one book, it was Tansy. Before that book, NO ONE was named Tansy, then out of nowhere, 3 different Tansy's showed up...then never again.

I about screamed when I found the Entire Family Named Walder.

And last night I noticed that he's apparently found Quenton as a name, because he just added a Quentyn and a Quenton.

Piratelvr1121

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Re: Reading/Book Pet Peeves
« Reply #661 on: April 12, 2013, 11:55:37 AM »
Or maybe it's just that J.K. Rowling and Suzanne Collins are just better writers for that genre than James Patterson is.

Don't you mean Gabrielle Charbonnet? I am fully convinced that at this point James Patterson just writes a plot outline on a cocktail napkin and hires someone else to write it, while he shoots the inane promos for TV. No human can put out that much content, in so many genres, that all read so differently, and manage to keep up his promo schedule. He's the Thomas Kinkade of literature.

I've suspected the same thing. I think he does have ghost writers because Witch and Wizard was written in such an amateur way, it read like bad fanfiction.  And his commercials are painful to watch, aren't they? 
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Twik

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Re: Reading/Book Pet Peeves
« Reply #662 on: April 12, 2013, 12:09:23 PM »
I mentioned my current fave fantasy author, Lindsay Buroker. She does have one favourite word - "ecumenical" - which she uses to mean, I gather "eclectic" or "covering a wide area of interests". Unfortunately, to me, I can't separate it from its religous meaning, so when she mentions that an assassin had an "ecumenical" education, I visualize him participating in the Council of Churches.

I know that the word *does* have a non-religious meaning, but it's so rarely used that way, it's rather jarring when Buroker pulls it out about five times a book.
My cousin's memoir of love and loneliness while raising a child with multiple disabilities will be out on Amazon soon! Know the Night, by Maria Mutch, has been called "full of hope, light, and companionship for surviving the small hours of the night."

Winterlight

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Re: Reading/Book Pet Peeves
« Reply #663 on: April 12, 2013, 12:20:31 PM »
I don't think even a hothouse in the 17th century would have provided fresh spinach (although I could be wrong). I recall watching a documentary series on cooking on an English Victorian estate, and trying to get fresh vegetables, even in the 19th century, was a real struggle in the winter. Most of the cooking involved root vegetables, which were much more easily stored.

I ran this past a historian friend and he said that it was highly unlikely they'd bother with something like spinach. If you had a hothouse then you were growing either exotics like pineapples for prestige or medicinal plants. There's no real return on investment for spinach. As for preserving it, the only option was pickling and that would not work for spinach because it would disintegrate.

Also, potatoes and pumpkins are New World, so pretty unlikely choices. Turnips, yes. Potatoes, no.
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Twik

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Re: Reading/Book Pet Peeves
« Reply #664 on: April 12, 2013, 12:27:59 PM »
Well, there would have been enough time by mid-1600s to get potatoes and pumpkins to Britain.

Apparently, the French were cooking pumpkin pies by that time: http://whatscookingamerica.net/History/PieHistory/PumpkinPie.htm.
My cousin's memoir of love and loneliness while raising a child with multiple disabilities will be out on Amazon soon! Know the Night, by Maria Mutch, has been called "full of hope, light, and companionship for surviving the small hours of the night."

Calistoga

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Re: Reading/Book Pet Peeves
« Reply #665 on: April 12, 2013, 12:46:25 PM »
I was reading one of the early books in the Wheel of Time series, and it made reference to someone walking "Like they were on a treadmill".

I had to hope that this was like...some kind of grain pressing thing that you had a donkey walk on, otherwise it was a very out of place reference.

Twik

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Re: Reading/Book Pet Peeves
« Reply #666 on: April 12, 2013, 12:55:11 PM »
Yes, treadmills are ancient, although using them for physical fitness is less so.

It used to be something that prisoners were put to do, if animals were not available. Some interesting photos here: http://www.efitology.com/expertadvice/from-prisons-into-our-homes-the-history-of-treadmill/.
My cousin's memoir of love and loneliness while raising a child with multiple disabilities will be out on Amazon soon! Know the Night, by Maria Mutch, has been called "full of hope, light, and companionship for surviving the small hours of the night."

MonteCristo

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Re: Reading/Book Pet Peeves
« Reply #667 on: April 12, 2013, 01:53:26 PM »
This has nothing to do with the content of the book, but dust jackets. I hate dust jackets. So much I hate them.

Oh eHell YES.

Without a dust jacket, what do you use for a bookmark?   ;)

Diane AKA Traska

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Re: Reading/Book Pet Peeves
« Reply #668 on: April 12, 2013, 01:54:42 PM »
This has nothing to do with the content of the book, but dust jackets. I hate dust jackets. So much I hate them.

Oh eHell YES.

Without a dust jacket, what do you use for a bookmark?   ;)

A bookmark.  :D  Or, I just remember the page number.  I usually go through a food book in a day or two anyway.

EDIT:  A good book.  A food book takes me considerably longer.  ;D
« Last Edit: April 12, 2013, 02:01:05 PM by Diane AKA Traska »
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Calistoga

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Re: Reading/Book Pet Peeves
« Reply #669 on: April 12, 2013, 01:55:50 PM »
I use a bookmark for a bookmark :P

Margo

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Re: Reading/Book Pet Peeves
« Reply #670 on: April 12, 2013, 01:55:57 PM »
Well, there would have been enough time by mid-1600s to get potatoes and pumpkins to Britain.

Apparently, the French were cooking pumpkin pies by that time: http://whatscookingamerica.net/History/PieHistory/PumpkinPie.htm.
Yes, my thoughts about the pumpkin pie was based as much on the fact that it never really seems to have taken off here, rather than that it wouldn't have been possible.
Potato seems more likely, as I think once they got here, they became a stsple part of people's diets quite quickly.

Redwing

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Re: Reading/Book Pet Peeves
« Reply #671 on: April 12, 2013, 02:12:06 PM »
I mentioned my current fave fantasy author, Lindsay Buroker. She does have one favourite word - "ecumenical" - which she uses to mean, I gather "eclectic" or "covering a wide area of interests". Unfortunately, to me, I can't separate it from its religous meaning, so when she mentions that an assassin had an "ecumenical" education, I visualize him participating in the Council of Churches.

I know that the word *does* have a non-religious meaning, but it's so rarely used that way, it's rather jarring when Buroker pulls it out about five times a book.

In somewhat of the same vein, I once read a book where every time the writer wanted to describe something having to do with the heroine's small apartmentor anything else diminutive in size, it was described as tiny.  Tiny couch, tiny table, tiny this, tiny that.  Drove me nuts.   And she did it over and over.  The couch was always tiny.  Not just, "She sat on the couch.", but, "She sat on her tiny couch."

Twik

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Re: Reading/Book Pet Peeves
« Reply #672 on: April 12, 2013, 02:16:01 PM »
Well, I amuse myself when she mentions the "ecumenical" background of her assassin by imaging someone saying, "Well, yes, he has murdered hundreds of people in cold blood. But he did get the Baptists and the Anglicans to agree on a lot of things!"
My cousin's memoir of love and loneliness while raising a child with multiple disabilities will be out on Amazon soon! Know the Night, by Maria Mutch, has been called "full of hope, light, and companionship for surviving the small hours of the night."

Luci

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Re: Reading/Book Pet Peeves
« Reply #673 on: April 12, 2013, 02:30:37 PM »
This has nothing to do with the content of the book, but dust jackets. I hate dust jackets. So much I hate them.

Oh eHell YES.

Without a dust jacket, what do you use for a bookmark?   ;)

A bookmark.  :D  Or, I just remember the page number.  I usually go through a food book in a day or two anyway.

EDIT:  A good book.  A food book takes me considerably longer.  ;D

Old greeting card. Clean tissue (thank Goodness!). Photo. $20.00 bill. Hairpin. Bread crust. Library card! Strip of newspaper. Math homework. A piece torn from another page in the book! (Major fine on that one!) Date due card. Those are some of the things I've found in books - some as a librarian, some as a public library patron.

Kariachi

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Re: Reading/Book Pet Peeves
« Reply #674 on: April 12, 2013, 02:47:38 PM »
Bread crust. [cut] A piece torn from another page in the book!

I swear to the gods my heart stopped. I use the dustcover on books that have them, otherwise I use an old receipt or some such. I'm in love with paperbacks, so...
"Heh. Forgive our manners, little creature — that we may well kill and eat you is no excuse for rudeness."