Author Topic: Reading/Book Pet Peeves  (Read 196940 times)

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cabbageweevil

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Re: Reading/Book Pet Peeves
« Reply #1335 on: September 11, 2013, 03:17:56 AM »
I'm reading Shogun right now, on and off, as its aggravating me a bit. The author writes like Inigo Montoya, flourishing every so often about things that its easy to lose track if what's going on. Im reminded of the Illiad, but at least Homer remembered the point, of he took his sweet time of getting to it.
I had the same problem with Les Miserables (the book). Hugo kept going off at lengthy, completely irrelevant tangents. It irritated me so much that I gave up on the book, long before the end.

Agreed. I cannot for the life of me read The House of the Seven Gables. It's too long, it makes no sense, and I just don't care one whit what the characters choose to do. I can't connect with them at all because the story takes such a long time to get around to them.
And Outdoor Girl wrote: "When I was 50 pages or so in and they were still describing the dingdangity house, I tossed that one too."

I have to confess that The House of the Seven Gables was a title unknown to me (I'm not American, which is maybe a bit of an excuse). Googled it: I have heard of Nathaniel Hawthorne, but not hitherto, of this one of his.  Learning what I have from you folks, am reckoning "one to leave alone" !

poundcake

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Re: Reading/Book Pet Peeves
« Reply #1336 on: September 11, 2013, 07:43:44 AM »
Actually, Hawthorne's short stories are amazing, twisted, and creepy. It's a shame they ruin him for people with The Scarlet Letter and House of the Seven Gables in school because there are more heavy handed "morals" to be extracted. Don't completely abandon him yet!

My current peeve is being utterly unable to come up with the right name for a FMC in my latest writing project. It's a peeve of mine that so many books in this genre have either overly fluffy names, or historically inaccurate names. I appreciate that a heroine has certain qualities, but it is highly unlikely that your Austen-obsessed FMC in 2013 will really have the name "Jane" to boot. Nor is your titled 18th c. French lady likely to be named "Typhanie." A rose by any other name really might not smell as sweet.

cabbageweevil

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Re: Reading/Book Pet Peeves
« Reply #1337 on: September 11, 2013, 09:35:21 AM »
Actually, Hawthorne's short stories are amazing, twisted, and creepy. It's a shame they ruin him for people with The Scarlet Letter and House of the Seven Gables in school because there are more heavy handed "morals" to be extracted. Don't completely abandon him yet!

My current peeve is being utterly unable to come up with the right name for a FMC in my latest writing project. It's a peeve of mine that so many books in this genre have either overly fluffy names, or historically inaccurate names. I appreciate that a heroine has certain qualities, but it is highly unlikely that your Austen-obsessed FMC in 2013 will really have the name "Jane" to boot. Nor is your titled 18th c. French lady likely to be named "Typhanie." A rose by any other name really might not smell as sweet.

Thanks for the tip re his short stories -- will try those first, if I go further at all re Mr. H.

Am probably being dim: but, am I right, FMC = female main character?

poundcake

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Re: Reading/Book Pet Peeves
« Reply #1338 on: September 11, 2013, 12:20:07 PM »
Yes, FMC and MMC are Female and Male Main Characters.

faithlessone

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Re: Reading/Book Pet Peeves
« Reply #1339 on: September 11, 2013, 01:00:18 PM »
My current peeve is being utterly unable to come up with the right name for a FMC in my latest writing project. It's a peeve of mine that so many books in this genre have either overly fluffy names, or historically inaccurate names. I appreciate that a heroine has certain qualities, but it is highly unlikely that your Austen-obsessed FMC in 2013 will really have the name "Jane" to boot.

Why not? I know four females (between the ages of 26 and 5) who are called Jane. I also know a 22-year-old called Emma-Jane, and a 7-year-old called Mary-Jane. It might be regional (I'm British), but it's hardly a dead name!

poundcake

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Re: Reading/Book Pet Peeves
« Reply #1340 on: September 11, 2013, 02:15:03 PM »
My current peeve is being utterly unable to come up with the right name for a FMC in my latest writing project. It's a peeve of mine that so many books in this genre have either overly fluffy names, or historically inaccurate names. I appreciate that a heroine has certain qualities, but it is highly unlikely that your Austen-obsessed FMC in 2013 will really have the name "Jane" to boot.

Why not? I know four females (between the ages of 26 and 5) who are called Jane. I also know a 22-year-old called Emma-Jane, and a 7-year-old called Mary-Jane. It might be regional (I'm British), but it's hardly a dead name!

Yes, but the likelihood of someone named Jane being an Austen and Bronte obsessed lit geek are more slim. Just ask my friend Jane who is eternally sick of hearing "Were you named for ___?" (she was) and if she just LOVES Austen as a result. Actually, because of that, she refuses to try to read Austen ever again! Naming your lit-obsessed heroine Jane seems more like the author's wishful thinking.

I do like that, as a name, it's seeing a comeback, though. It's timeless. 

faithlessone

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Re: Reading/Book Pet Peeves
« Reply #1341 on: September 11, 2013, 03:21:18 PM »
My current peeve is being utterly unable to come up with the right name for a FMC in my latest writing project. It's a peeve of mine that so many books in this genre have either overly fluffy names, or historically inaccurate names. I appreciate that a heroine has certain qualities, but it is highly unlikely that your Austen-obsessed FMC in 2013 will really have the name "Jane" to boot.

Why not? I know four females (between the ages of 26 and 5) who are called Jane. I also know a 22-year-old called Emma-Jane, and a 7-year-old called Mary-Jane. It might be regional (I'm British), but it's hardly a dead name!

Yes, but the likelihood of someone named Jane being an Austen and Bronte obsessed lit geek are more slim. Just ask my friend Jane who is eternally sick of hearing "Were you named for ___?" (she was) and if she just LOVES Austen as a result. Actually, because of that, she refuses to try to read Austen ever again! Naming your lit-obsessed heroine Jane seems more like the author's wishful thinking.

I do like that, as a name, it's seeing a comeback, though. It's timeless. 

Ahh, okay.

I actually used to have a friend called Elizabeth Bennet. She developed a love of the book as a defence mechanism. ;D (Interestingly, she had three sisters, none of which shared their name with any of the other Bennet girls.)

cwm

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Re: Reading/Book Pet Peeves
« Reply #1342 on: September 11, 2013, 03:26:42 PM »
Actually, Hawthorne's short stories are amazing, twisted, and creepy. It's a shame they ruin him for people with The Scarlet Letter and House of the Seven Gables in school because there are more heavy handed "morals" to be extracted. Don't completely abandon him yet!

I will have to keep that in mind. I never give up on an author who is writing well within his time period after one book, and Hawthorne was just writing as authors did in his day. Never read Scarlet Letter, though. But I'll check out the short stories. If/when I have time.

Elfmama

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Re: Reading/Book Pet Peeves
« Reply #1343 on: September 11, 2013, 03:28:40 PM »
Actually, Hawthorne's short stories are amazing, twisted, and creepy. It's a shame they ruin him for people with The Scarlet Letter and House of the Seven Gables in school because there are more heavy handed "morals" to be extracted. Don't completely abandon him yet!

My current peeve is being utterly unable to come up with the right name for a FMC in my latest writing project. It's a peeve of mine that so many books in this genre have either overly fluffy names, or historically inaccurate names. I appreciate that a heroine has certain qualities, but it is highly unlikely that your Austen-obsessed FMC in 2013 will really have the name "Jane" to boot. Nor is your titled 18th c. French lady likely to be named "Typhanie." A rose by any other name really might not smell as sweet.
Why not? It's not a modern name. I can positively date Tiffany/Tyffayne/Theophania to the Middle Ages, as early as 1206.  The French form is Tiphaine. 
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poundcake

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Re: Reading/Book Pet Peeves
« Reply #1344 on: September 11, 2013, 05:00:25 PM »
Actually, Hawthorne's short stories are amazing, twisted, and creepy. It's a shame they ruin him for people with The Scarlet Letter and House of the Seven Gables in school because there are more heavy handed "morals" to be extracted. Don't completely abandon him yet!

My current peeve is being utterly unable to come up with the right name for a FMC in my latest writing project. It's a peeve of mine that so many books in this genre have either overly fluffy names, or historically inaccurate names. I appreciate that a heroine has certain qualities, but it is highly unlikely that your Austen-obsessed FMC in 2013 will really have the name "Jane" to boot. Nor is your titled 18th c. French lady likely to be named "Typhanie." A rose by any other name really might not smell as sweet.
Why not? It's not a modern name. I can positively date Tiffany/Tyffayne/Theophania to the Middle Ages, as early as 1206.  The French form is Tiphaine. 


Yes, but the French MA  "Tiphanine" is not the same thing as a contemporary flavored "Typhanie," which looks like something "unique" from a bad baby name website. It looks like someone was either trying to hard, or had no idea what they were doing, or both. It would be almost like having a Renaissance lady named Madyssynne!

cabbageweevil

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Re: Reading/Book Pet Peeves
« Reply #1345 on: September 11, 2013, 05:31:04 PM »
Yes, FMC and MMC are Female and Male Main Characters.

Thanks. Pretty obvious, I suppose; but I sometimes have trouble with initials and acronyms -- ever after three years or so of frequenting eHell !

SpottedPony

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Re: Reading/Book Pet Peeves
« Reply #1346 on: September 11, 2013, 05:34:19 PM »
A book I didn't get was Ivanhoe.  Ivanhoe was barely a main character in this story.  The Jewish Maiden's Tale or The Adventures Of The Norman Knight would have been better titles.  The book was more about them than Ivanhoe.

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Arila

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Re: Reading/Book Pet Peeves
« Reply #1347 on: September 11, 2013, 06:21:18 PM »
Lately in fan fiction, I seem to come across "Ever so much" ever so much more than I would like! Sets my teeth on edge. I usually just grit them and get through it - my own fault for seeking out amature fiction.


I do like it better when the author challenges me a bit and just straight out describes a scene rather than putting all the commentary about what's going on, but sometimes it's TOO vague and I just can't figure out what's going on. I can read faces in person, but sometimes the same words can be used to describe expressions which I would know instantaneously in a photo, but can't make out by text. A furrowed brow could be confusion, anger, concentration, angsty thoughtfulness etc. etc. An example of one that I've not been able to really ever get right...
Quote
...and Elizabeth, happening to see the countenance of both as they looked at each other, was all astonishment at the effect of the meeting. Both changed colour; one looked white, the other red. Mr. Wickham, after a few moments, touched his hat -- a salutation which Mr. Darcy just deigned to return. What could be the meaning of it? -- It was impossible to imagine; it was impossible not to long to know.

Which was which? Am I supposed to know?

cabbagegirl28

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Re: Reading/Book Pet Peeves
« Reply #1348 on: September 11, 2013, 06:24:16 PM »
Lately in fan fiction, I seem to come across "Ever so much" ever so much more than I would like! Sets my teeth on edge. I usually just grit them and get through it - my own fault for seeking out amature fiction.


I do like it better when the author challenges me a bit and just straight out describes a scene rather than putting all the commentary about what's going on, but sometimes it's TOO vague and I just can't figure out what's going on. I can read faces in person, but sometimes the same words can be used to describe expressions which I would know instantaneously in a photo, but can't make out by text. A furrowed brow could be confusion, anger, concentration, angsty thoughtfulness etc. etc. An example of one that I've not been able to really ever get right...
Quote
...and Elizabeth, happening to see the countenance of both as they looked at each other, was all astonishment at the effect of the meeting. Both changed colour; one looked white, the other red. Mr. Wickham, after a few moments, touched his hat -- a salutation which Mr. Darcy just deigned to return. What could be the meaning of it? -- It was impossible to imagine; it was impossible not to long to know.

Which was which? Am I supposed to know?

IME with classical literature, women turn white when embarrassed, surprised, etc. I'd need the whole paragraph to make a clear judgement, though.


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Two Ravens

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Re: Reading/Book Pet Peeves
« Reply #1349 on: September 11, 2013, 06:24:56 PM »
Lately in fan fiction, I seem to come across "Ever so much" ever so much more than I would like! Sets my teeth on edge. I usually just grit them and get through it - my own fault for seeking out amature fiction.


I do like it better when the author challenges me a bit and just straight out describes a scene rather than putting all the commentary about what's going on, but sometimes it's TOO vague and I just can't figure out what's going on. I can read faces in person, but sometimes the same words can be used to describe expressions which I would know instantaneously in a photo, but can't make out by text. A furrowed brow could be confusion, anger, concentration, angsty thoughtfulness etc. etc. An example of one that I've not been able to really ever get right...
Quote
...and Elizabeth, happening to see the countenance of both as they looked at each other, was all astonishment at the effect of the meeting. Both changed colour; one looked white, the other red. Mr. Wickham, after a few moments, touched his hat -- a salutation which Mr. Darcy just deigned to return. What could be the meaning of it? -- It was impossible to imagine; it was impossible not to long to know.

Which was which? Am I supposed to know?

Wickham turned white, because the sudden appearance of Darcy frightened him, and Darcy flushed in anger at seeing him. At least, that's how I always read it.