Author Topic: At the grocery with my 2-year old  (Read 11032 times)

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Sharnita

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Re: At the grocery with my 2-year old
« Reply #120 on: January 31, 2013, 02:18:38 PM »
"Watch out" works just fine as a response to a potential emergency. As long term behavior management it is problematic.

Tabby Uprising

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Re: At the grocery with my 2-year old
« Reply #121 on: January 31, 2013, 02:19:24 PM »
I've never experienced this. If that is the case I will concede that what the OP's son is doing could be irritating. I still am not convinced that a person being short makes them more responsible to watch where they are going than other people. There are always children in the grocery store. It makes no sense to not be just as aware of them as the adults.

A free range toddler does not tend to move in patterns.

A few years ago, I was at an amusement park.  There was a toddler running at me, so I moved right so I'd was out of her path.  The child moved into my path.  So I moved again and again the child moved in the same direction I moved in.  Since I could not predict the child's movements, I just stopped and stepped aside, out of her current path.

Said toddler still ran smack into my legs and wound up on her tush, crying.  She ran into me, I was not moving and did not walk into her.  But *I* was at fault according to the parent and was told to "WATCH OUT".  I WAS watching out, and did what I could to avoid a collision. 

Add a shopping cart and a distracted shopper and the OP's child *could* wind up injured.  Carts (especially full ones) do not stop on a dime.

This situation is completely different. The OP is redirecting her child. Her child won't wind up injured because she is looking out for him.

A shopper could come along in a split second before shygirl calls to her son, and knock him down, or in the case of someone with mobility issues, be knocked down by  him. Redirecting is one thing. Physical control over a toddler is another.

But none of those things have happened with the OP and her son.  They are hypothetical situations.  They certainly could happen, but they could happen with any child and even with adults.  At some point the kids have to come out of the cart and come off the leash.  Everyone just needs to be careful and watch where they are going.  OP is managing this with her DS just fine.  There haven't been any accidents.  When he has the occasional toddler-drift, she gets him back on course. 

LeveeWoman

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Re: At the grocery with my 2-year old
« Reply #122 on: January 31, 2013, 02:19:44 PM »
When I'm moving, I cannot see directly in front of me due to where I place my purse on which I prop the notebook containing my list. Nor can I see if my cart is full if I have a tall object in it. And, while I'm moving, I'm also looking at the goods on the shelves.

It is quite conceivable that a toddler could be in front of me while I'm moving and I wouldn't see him. It is also concievable that a toddler could be in front of me while I'm stopped and about to start moving again. There is no way I can move my purse and clear my cart of the objects it holds every time I start walking again.

It is the parent's job to keep her kid out of harm's way.

If I heard a parent call, "Watch out!" while I'm moving or about to move again, I would think she or he is talking to me because I would not see the child to whom this is addressed, and it would irritate me.

In that case I think you are being rude for looking elsewhere while moving your cart. You should be watching where you are going. And I am sorry, but just because something irritates you does not make it rude.

I should come to a stop every time I look at the shelves?


Millionaire Maria

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Re: At the grocery with my 2-year old
« Reply #123 on: January 31, 2013, 02:21:50 PM »
Here's something I just don't get: What possible benefit is there to not having your child either strapped in or holding onto your cart or hand?

The same kind of benefit that comes with every new milestone, however small: independence. Very few milestones during toddlerhood are black and white. It's not a matter of being in the cart or walking unsupervised. The point that the OP is at is somewhere in between, where her son is allowed to walk, but she still watches where he is going and gives him verbal corrections.
People everywhere enjoy believing in things they know are not true. It spares them the ordeal of thinking for themselves and taking responsibility for what they know. –Brooks Atkinson

snowdragon

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Re: At the grocery with my 2-year old
« Reply #124 on: January 31, 2013, 02:23:08 PM »
I've never experienced this. If that is the case I will concede that what the OP's son is doing could be irritating. I still am not convinced that a person being short makes them more responsible to watch where they are going than other people. There are always children in the grocery store. It makes no sense to not be just as aware of them as the adults.

A free range toddler does not tend to move in patterns.

A few years ago, I was at an amusement park.  There was a toddler running at me, so I moved right so I'd was out of her path.  The child moved into my path.  So I moved again and again the child moved in the same direction I moved in.  Since I could not predict the child's movements, I just stopped and stepped aside, out of her current path.

Said toddler still ran smack into my legs and wound up on her tush, crying.  She ran into me, I was not moving and did not walk into her.  But *I* was at fault according to the parent and was told to "WATCH OUT".  I WAS watching out, and did what I could to avoid a collision. 

Add a shopping cart and a distracted shopper and the OP's child *could* wind up injured.  Carts (especially full ones) do not stop on a dime.

This situation is completely different. The OP is redirecting her child. Her child won't wind up injured because she is looking out for him.

A shopper could come along in a split second before shygirl calls to her son, and knock him down, or in the case of someone with mobility issues, be knocked down by  him. Redirecting is one thing. Physical control over a toddler is another.

But none of those things have happened with the OP and her son.  They are hypothetical situations.  They certainly could happen, but they could happen with any child and even with adults.  At some point the kids have to come out of the cart and come off the leash.  Everyone just needs to be careful and watch where they are going.  OP is managing this with her DS just fine.  There haven't been any accidents.  When he has the occasional toddler-drift, she gets him back on course. 

 And when it does who is responsible for the damage to the other shopper or the store's goods, hypothetically speaking, of course.


 Re - reading that I realize it came of at snarking...I am not meaning to be snarky I truely wonder where the financial responsibility lies but I don't want to make that question about the OP

Moray

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Re: At the grocery with my 2-year old
« Reply #125 on: January 31, 2013, 02:24:07 PM »
Here's something I just don't get: What possible benefit is there to not having your child either strapped in or holding onto your cart or hand?

The same kind of benefit that comes with every new milestone, however small: independence. Very few milestones during toddlerhood are black and white. It's not a matter of being in the cart or walking unsupervised. The point that the OP is at is somewhere in between, where her son is allowed to walk, but she still watches where he is going and gives him verbal corrections.

The child still learns independence while holding onto the cart; furthermore, the OP has indicated that her reason for going free range is that the child objects to anything else. I am interested in the OP's response.
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LeveeWoman

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Re: At the grocery with my 2-year old
« Reply #126 on: January 31, 2013, 02:24:30 PM »
Quote
And, while I'm moving, I'm also looking at the goods on the shelves

I've been trying to think about the way that I shop.  And when I saw this sentence in the post above, it occurred to me that that's what I do.  When I'm shopping, I'm not, specifically, looking straight ahead of me.  I'm looking at the shelves to see where I need to go to get what I'm looking for. I'm not disregarding what's in front of me and I do see out of the corner of my eyes to see if I'm running into something.  But, no.  I actually am not really always looking straight ahead of me when I shop.  I don't think anyone really does.  Stop and think about what you're doing when you're in the store.  You're probably looking at shelves more often than not, too.

There is no way I could keep a look out for a toddler in this situation because my view is blocked by my purse and the items in my cart. I'd have to move my body from behind the cart to the side so that I could look in front of it, and my head from eye-level to the floor.

And, while I'm moving my body from the back of the cart, I'd have to make sure there was no one coming up from behind me so that I'd not be hit by their cart.


Millionaire Maria

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Re: At the grocery with my 2-year old
« Reply #127 on: January 31, 2013, 02:25:14 PM »
When I'm moving, I cannot see directly in front of me due to where I place my purse on which I prop the notebook containing my list. Nor can I see if my cart is full if I have a tall object in it. And, while I'm moving, I'm also looking at the goods on the shelves.

It is quite conceivable that a toddler could be in front of me while I'm moving and I wouldn't see him. It is also concievable that a toddler could be in front of me while I'm stopped and about to start moving again. There is no way I can move my purse and clear my cart of the objects it holds every time I start walking again.

It is the parent's job to keep her kid out of harm's way.

If I heard a parent call, "Watch out!" while I'm moving or about to move again, I would think she or he is talking to me because I would not see the child to whom this is addressed, and it would irritate me.

In that case I think you are being rude for looking elsewhere while moving your cart. You should be watching where you are going. And I am sorry, but just because something irritates you does not make it rude.

I should come to a stop every time I look at the shelves?

Yes, if you are looking at the shelves you should be stopped. If you are glancing at them, which is what I think you are referring to, then no, I don't think you should have to stop. But the point is that you are probably not going to miss a veering toddler by glancing away for moment.
People everywhere enjoy believing in things they know are not true. It spares them the ordeal of thinking for themselves and taking responsibility for what they know. –Brooks Atkinson

Tabby Uprising

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Re: At the grocery with my 2-year old
« Reply #128 on: January 31, 2013, 02:25:56 PM »
I've never experienced this. If that is the case I will concede that what the OP's son is doing could be irritating. I still am not convinced that a person being short makes them more responsible to watch where they are going than other people. There are always children in the grocery store. It makes no sense to not be just as aware of them as the adults.

A free range toddler does not tend to move in patterns.

A few years ago, I was at an amusement park.  There was a toddler running at me, so I moved right so I'd was out of her path.  The child moved into my path.  So I moved again and again the child moved in the same direction I moved in.  Since I could not predict the child's movements, I just stopped and stepped aside, out of her current path.

Said toddler still ran smack into my legs and wound up on her tush, crying.  She ran into me, I was not moving and did not walk into her.  But *I* was at fault according to the parent and was told to "WATCH OUT".  I WAS watching out, and did what I could to avoid a collision. 

Add a shopping cart and a distracted shopper and the OP's child *could* wind up injured.  Carts (especially full ones) do not stop on a dime.

This situation is completely different. The OP is redirecting her child. Her child won't wind up injured because she is looking out for him.

A shopper could come along in a split second before shygirl calls to her son, and knock him down, or in the case of someone with mobility issues, be knocked down by  him. Redirecting is one thing. Physical control over a toddler is another.

But none of those things have happened with the OP and her son.  They are hypothetical situations.  They certainly could happen, but they could happen with any child and even with adults.  At some point the kids have to come out of the cart and come off the leash.  Everyone just needs to be careful and watch where they are going.  OP is managing this with her DS just fine.  There haven't been any accidents.  When he has the occasional toddler-drift, she gets him back on course. 

 And when it does who is responsible for the damage to the other shopper or the store's goods, hypothetically speaking, of course.

Who is responsible for damage when people bump into each other?  It would probably depend on the specific circumstances of what happened.  And in that case, I'm sure there are appropriate authorities for sorting it all out.

Moray

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Re: At the grocery with my 2-year old
« Reply #129 on: January 31, 2013, 02:26:38 PM »
When I'm moving, I cannot see directly in front of me due to where I place my purse on which I prop the notebook containing my list. Nor can I see if my cart is full if I have a tall object in it. And, while I'm moving, I'm also looking at the goods on the shelves.

It is quite conceivable that a toddler could be in front of me while I'm moving and I wouldn't see him. It is also concievable that a toddler could be in front of me while I'm stopped and about to start moving again. There is no way I can move my purse and clear my cart of the objects it holds every time I start walking again.

It is the parent's job to keep her kid out of harm's way.

If I heard a parent call, "Watch out!" while I'm moving or about to move again, I would think she or he is talking to me because I would not see the child to whom this is addressed, and it would irritate me.

In that case I think you are being rude for looking elsewhere while moving your cart. You should be watching where you are going. And I am sorry, but just because something irritates you does not make it rude.

I should come to a stop every time I look at the shelves?

Yes, if you are looking at the shelves you should be stopped. If you are glancing at them, which is what I think you are referring to, then no, I don't think you should have to stop. But the point is that you are probably not going to miss a veering toddler by glancing away for moment.

No, Dandy Andy's Daddy's Love. The point is that if the parent were controlling the toddler, there would be nothing to watch out for.
Utah

Millionaire Maria

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Re: At the grocery with my 2-year old
« Reply #130 on: January 31, 2013, 02:27:49 PM »
The child still learns independence while holding onto the cart; furthermore, the OP has indicated that her reason for going free range is that the child objects to anything else. I am interested in the OP's response.

Absolutely, and I think that at this point it may be a good idea. But he's going to have to let go of the cart sometime.
People everywhere enjoy believing in things they know are not true. It spares them the ordeal of thinking for themselves and taking responsibility for what they know. –Brooks Atkinson

LeveeWoman

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Re: At the grocery with my 2-year old
« Reply #131 on: January 31, 2013, 02:28:26 PM »
I've never experienced this. If that is the case I will concede that what the OP's son is doing could be irritating. I still am not convinced that a person being short makes them more responsible to watch where they are going than other people. There are always children in the grocery store. It makes no sense to not be just as aware of them as the adults.

A free range toddler does not tend to move in patterns.

A few years ago, I was at an amusement park.  There was a toddler running at me, so I moved right so I'd was out of her path.  The child moved into my path.  So I moved again and again the child moved in the same direction I moved in.  Since I could not predict the child's movements, I just stopped and stepped aside, out of her current path.

Said toddler still ran smack into my legs and wound up on her tush, crying.  She ran into me, I was not moving and did not walk into her.  But *I* was at fault according to the parent and was told to "WATCH OUT".  I WAS watching out, and did what I could to avoid a collision. 

Add a shopping cart and a distracted shopper and the OP's child *could* wind up injured.  Carts (especially full ones) do not stop on a dime.

This situation is completely different. The OP is redirecting her child. Her child won't wind up injured because she is looking out for him.

A shopper could come along in a split second before shygirl calls to her son, and knock him down, or in the case of someone with mobility issues, be knocked down by  him. Redirecting is one thing. Physical control over a toddler is another.

But none of those things have happened with the OP and her son.  They are hypothetical situations.  They certainly could happen, but they could happen with any child and even with adults.  At some point the kids have to come out of the cart and come off the leash.  Everyone just needs to be careful and watch where they are going.  OP is managing this with her DS just fine.  There haven't been any accidents.  When he has the occasional toddler-drift, she gets him back on course.

There is a potential that that could happen, and it is the job of the parent to keep her kid out of the way of others. Just because an accident hasn't happened yet doesn't mean one will not happen.

As for it happening to an adult, that's impossible if the adult is not the size of a typical two-year-old toddler.

DottyG

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Re: At the grocery with my 2-year old
« Reply #132 on: January 31, 2013, 02:28:50 PM »
Quote
There is no way I could keep a look out for a toddler in this situation because my view is blocked by my purse and the items in my cart. I'd have to move my body from behind the cart to the side so that I could look in front of it, and my head from eye-level to the floor.

And, while I'm moving my body from the back of the cart, I'd have to make sure there was no one coming up from behind me so that I'd not be hit by their cart.

LeeveeWoman, I'm not disagreeing with you - I'm more addressing the comment that, when you're moving, you're always looking straight ahead of you.  That's not how people shop.  In fact, I'd be willing to bet that everyone is shopping pretty much the same way - when they're moving, they're also looking at shelves (not with tunnel vision to where they don't see elsewhere, but still not always looking straight ahead of them).

It's the same thing when you drive.  You don't constantly look tunnel-visioned straight ahead of you.  You're looking at cross streets and signs and the rear-view mirror, etc.  That's not to say that you barrel into other cars ahead of you - of course you're looking at what's in front of you.  But you're also looking at the street signs to see if this is where you turn right or whatever.

Editing to put the quote in that I was referring to
 
 
« Last Edit: January 31, 2013, 02:33:02 PM by DottyG »

Millionaire Maria

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Re: At the grocery with my 2-year old
« Reply #133 on: January 31, 2013, 02:28:55 PM »
No, Dandy Andy's Daddy's Love. The point is that if the parent were controlling the toddler, there would be nothing to watch out for.

The parent is controlling the toddler.
People everywhere enjoy believing in things they know are not true. It spares them the ordeal of thinking for themselves and taking responsibility for what they know. –Brooks Atkinson

Moray

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Re: At the grocery with my 2-year old
« Reply #134 on: January 31, 2013, 02:30:26 PM »
The child still learns independence while holding onto the cart; furthermore, the OP has indicated that her reason for going free range is that the child objects to anything else. I am interested in the OP's response.

Absolutely, and I think that at this point it may be a good idea. But he's going to have to let go of the cart sometime.

Yeah, when he's learned to pay better attention and not wander aimlessly. Most 2-3 year olds simply can't manage that, and the time to teach them isn't where it would inconvenience a whole bunch of other people. The time to teach him, as rashea pointed out, is in other situations where he can practice (and fail) without risk.
Utah