Author Topic: S/O PD Student Darwinism  (Read 236219 times)

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MariaE

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Re: S/O PD Student Darwinism
« Reply #15 on: February 01, 2013, 02:45:36 PM »
How to get kicked out of an open admissions community college:

1. Develop a crush on a professor
2. Make up excuses to hang around after class to talk to said professor
3. Make up reasons to visit said professor during office hours and call his office at all hours of the day and night.
4. Swoon over said professor as often as possible
5. Get offended when said professor does everything in his power to reduce contact with you to the absolute minimum required and still be an effective teacher.
6. Complain to everybody who will listen that said professor is being unfair and mean.
7. Make a fool of yourself in front of the ethics board when you bring the complaint to them and they discover that the professor has been kindly trying to not embarrass you by simply keeping discussion to the relevant subject matter and not kicking you out of his office.
8. Complain again that the ethics board must be biased because they didn't see things your way.
9. Get put on probation for inappropriate contact.
10.  Attempt to register for said professor's class, even though you have been banned from doing so as a result of your own ethics violation, as determined in the ethics board hearing.
11.  Pitch a fit in the admissions office that is big enough to not only require security, but a call to the local police, in order to remove you.
12.  Get kicked out of school.
:o

In my high school (grades 11-13, so ages 15-19) we had a very young, and very cute teacher. I never actually had him for any classes myself, but I've got eyes in my head ;) Anyway, the first few years he taught (until the age difference became enough that it didn't seem to be an issue) he got up on stage the first day of school to let people know he was happily married and had a kid.

... I always wondered what had happened the previous years to necessitate that kind of disclaimer...
 
Dane by birth, Kiwi by choice

LilacGirl1983

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Re: S/O PD Student Darwinism
« Reply #16 on: February 01, 2013, 03:36:48 PM »
I hope this becomes SD but my husband is in technical degree...each quarter there are some of the same students that obviously plagerize things..as in my husband takes the first couple of sentences and google them and it comes up word for word in an already published article and it is the exact same as the student's article..word for word. I keep telling him to let the higher ups know but he doesn't want to tattle.

Black Delphinium

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Re: S/O PD Student Darwinism
« Reply #17 on: February 01, 2013, 03:44:52 PM »
I knew a guy who argued with his department chair and called said department chair very unkind things over a grade...he got kicked out of school.
When angels go bad, they go worse than anyone. Remember, Lucifer was an angel. ~The Marquis De Carabas

VorFemme

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Re: S/O PD Student Darwinism
« Reply #18 on: February 01, 2013, 04:20:11 PM »
How to get kicked out of an open admissions community college:

1. Develop a crush on a professor
2. Make up excuses to hang around after class to talk to said professor
3. Make up reasons to visit said professor during office hours and call his office at all hours of the day and night.
4. Swoon over said professor as often as possible
5. Get offended when said professor does everything in his power to reduce contact with you to the absolute minimum required and still be an effective teacher.
6. Complain to everybody who will listen that said professor is being unfair and mean.
7. Make a fool of yourself in front of the ethics board when you bring the complaint to them and they discover that the professor has been kindly trying to not embarrass you by simply keeping discussion to the relevant subject matter and not kicking you out of his office.
8. Complain again that the ethics board must be biased because they didn't see things your way.
9. Get put on probation for inappropriate contact.
10.  Attempt to register for said professor's class, even though you have been banned from doing so as a result of your own ethics violation, as determined in the ethics board hearing.
11.  Pitch a fit in the admissions office that is big enough to not only require security, but a call to the local police, in order to remove you.
12.  Get kicked out of school.
:o

In my high school (grades 11-13, so ages 15-19) we had a very young, and very cute teacher. I never actually had him for any classes myself, but I've got eyes in my head ;) Anyway, the first few years he taught (until the age difference became enough that it didn't seem to be an issue) he got up on stage the first day of school to let people know he was happily married and had a kid.

... I always wondered what had happened the previous years to necessitate that kind of disclaimer...

Young teacher my last three years of high school.  After I graduated, he married one of the students in my class (I ran into them some fifteen years later, still married, with children, and working together in a small business).  He was fired immediately - apparently whether or not he started dating her after graduation or before, he wasn't allowed to marry a former student some five or six years his junior (she would have started as a freshman about the time he started his first or second year of teaching).  And there might have been some other (non-PC) background to it, thirty-odd years ago.  She was a blonde cheerleader type - he was a very good looking Latino - think "Ricky Ricardo" without the drums......

Let sleeping dragons be.......morning breath......need I say more?

Hawkwatcher

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Re: S/O PD Student Darwinism
« Reply #19 on: February 01, 2013, 04:24:17 PM »
These are some examples of Student Darwinism that I have witnessed:

Case 1: A female student went to a professor to complain about her TA.  She screamed loudly enough so that everyone could hear her describe how she never got below a "B" when she was attending a "real college" so how could the "evil" TA give her a poor grade at this school?  Telling a professor that he is not working at a "real" school probably is not the best way to convince him to raise your grade.

Case 2: Another student giggled and cheered when the class professor announced that she had to cancel the next class to attend the funeral of a family member.

Yarnspinner

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Re: S/O PD Student Darwinism
« Reply #20 on: February 01, 2013, 07:47:17 PM »
Observing student "research" at the library:

Before computers we had a dozen typewriters that people signed up for in two hour increments.  One young lady asked me for several books on Martin Luther King Jr.'s life.  "I need to do research to write my paper" said she.

I don't remember the reason why I had to go over to the typewriters (I think her group of friends were having a friend fight and were getting loud).  She was doing her research all right. 

She was surrounded by three different books and her "research and writing" took the following form:  She would type the first sentence of the first paragraph of the first book and follow it with the first sentence of the first paragraph of the second book and so on down the line.  She asked me what I thought about her paper and I said I thought she would have a better shot if she took notes and then wrote things in her own words instead of plagiarizing.  Oh, no she insisted, plagiarizing was when you copied a whole book word for word and she was taking random sentences and reorganizing them.

Twenty years later, I still remember one of the paragraphs:

Martin Luther King Jr. married Coretta Scott.  Black people threw food and ketchup.  250,000 police officers were required to stop the riots that followed. 

mmswm

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Re: S/O PD Student Darwinism
« Reply #21 on: February 01, 2013, 08:19:57 PM »
Observing student "research" at the library:

Before computers we had a dozen typewriters that people signed up for in two hour increments.  One young lady asked me for several books on Martin Luther King Jr.'s life.  "I need to do research to write my paper" said she.

I don't remember the reason why I had to go over to the typewriters (I think her group of friends were having a friend fight and were getting loud).  She was doing her research all right. 

She was surrounded by three different books and her "research and writing" took the following form:  She would type the first sentence of the first paragraph of the first book and follow it with the first sentence of the first paragraph of the second book and so on down the line.  She asked me what I thought about her paper and I said I thought she would have a better shot if she took notes and then wrote things in her own words instead of plagiarizing.  Oh, no she insisted, plagiarizing was when you copied a whole book word for word and she was taking random sentences and reorganizing them.

Twenty years later, I still remember one of the paragraphs:

Martin Luther King Jr. married Coretta Scott.  Black people threw food and ketchup.  250,000 police officers were required to stop the riots that followed. 

You know, half chewed bits of Hershey's Kisses don't feel very good coming out of your nose.  I really should learn not to open the "off-topic" threads while I'm eating or drinking something.
Some people lift weights.  I lift measures.  It's a far more esoteric workout. - (Quoted from a personal friend)

Kiara

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Re: S/O PD Student Darwinism
« Reply #22 on: February 01, 2013, 11:49:36 PM »
Observing student "research" at the library:

Before computers we had a dozen typewriters that people signed up for in two hour increments.  One young lady asked me for several books on Martin Luther King Jr.'s life.  "I need to do research to write my paper" said she.

I don't remember the reason why I had to go over to the typewriters (I think her group of friends were having a friend fight and were getting loud).  She was doing her research all right. 

She was surrounded by three different books and her "research and writing" took the following form:  She would type the first sentence of the first paragraph of the first book and follow it with the first sentence of the first paragraph of the second book and so on down the line.  She asked me what I thought about her paper and I said I thought she would have a better shot if she took notes and then wrote things in her own words instead of plagiarizing.  Oh, no she insisted, plagiarizing was when you copied a whole book word for word and she was taking random sentences and reorganizing them.

Twenty years later, I still remember one of the paragraphs:

Martin Luther King Jr. married Coretta Scott.  Black people threw food and ketchup.  250,000 police officers were required to stop the riots that followed. 

You know, half chewed bits of Hershey's Kisses don't feel very good coming out of your nose.  I really should learn not to open the "off-topic" threads while I'm eating or drinking something.

The resulting laughter also scares the heck out of the cats.

PeterM

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Re: S/O PD Student Darwinism
« Reply #23 on: February 02, 2013, 03:26:59 AM »
Yup, something similar happened to me in high school. This kid sitting next to me was copying off my test, to the point that he also copied my (female) name! IIRC, the teacher caught him mid-test and also pointed out the name thing. That's just sort of mind-boggling to me.

I had a guy copy from me on a Home Ec test once in high school. Honestly, I didn't care if he wanted to copy, but I didn't know most of the answers myself so I was just making stuff up. I had to risk getting us both caught to warn him off. He was angry at me afterwards, for leading him astray I suppose, but my position was that he should've known something was up when I listed the three types of white sauce as "Larry, Moe and Curly." Yes, he copied that verbatim.

He might be a lawyer these days, if I remember right.

PeterM

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Re: S/O PD Student Darwinism
« Reply #24 on: February 02, 2013, 03:30:18 AM »
I suppose I could submit myself when I took Chemistry in college.  The teacher liked to encourage intellectual curiosity and let us make explosives if we wanted to try them out.  I figured it was no biggie if everyone was doing it and our lab tables were fire-proof.

I hope my kids never do that.

My chemistry teacher in high school became interested in the subject as a child, when he would mix up big batches of gunpowder and make his own grenades. He rubber-banded nails around the outside for the all-important fragmentation effect.

Lemme tell ya, that guy had some awesome stories. At least 95% of them began with, "Now you kids should never do anything like this yourselves, but..."

camlan

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Re: S/O PD Student Darwinism
« Reply #25 on: February 02, 2013, 10:00:52 AM »
While in grad school, I was a Teaching Assistant. Mostly I taught Freshman English, where I didn't assist a professor, but taught the classes on my own.

I taught two sections a semester. It is the wise student who, when "borrowing" the paper her roommate had written the previous semester, inquires as to the name of the roommate's instructor. It is the foolish student who does not do so, and turns the paper in to the same instructor, thereby getting a failing grade in the course, and academic probation for herself and her roommate.

On the first paper one semester, I gave a student a "C." Not horrible, but not a great grade, either. She came to talk to me about the paper. In the middle of her heated defense, she blurted out, "But my high school English teacher gave this an A!" Not plagiarism, as she did write the paper herself, but not meeting the requirements of the assignment, either, as she was supposed to write a draft and do some other things. We had a little talk about that. She did turn out to be a good student.

The kid who walked into my office on a hot, sticky day and moved the student chair from the side of my desk to right next to mine, adjusted the fan so it would blow directly on him and not on me at all, sat down, propped his elbow on the desk, leaned into my face and said, "So, what can I do so you give me an A in this class?" He was quite unhappy when I adjusted  the fan and told him, "Do all the work and come to me with any questions." Apparently, he'd been hoping to write a song and play the guitar and get an A in English class.

The kid who brought me a draft of his paper during office hours. I was 95% sure the entire paper was plagiarized, but couldn't prove it then and there (early days of the internet, no computers in the entire department--proving this would have meant a trip to the library). So instead I questioned him closely on where he had gotten his ideas--ideas never mentioned in class, or mentioned using completely different terminology, pointed out flaws, and told him that the paper didn't meet the assignment--he was supposed to compare and contrast two works, not write about just one. Basically trying to show him that I suspected the paper was not his, but without coming out and saying that (we weren't supposed to accuse anyone of plagiarism unless we had certain proof). He submitted the paper anyway, and I found almost all of it was from Craigs Notes. Then I had to deal with the kid crying buckets in my office about how he "didn't mean to do it."

One semester I was a TA for a large, 500 person, lecture course. All the TAs had discussion sections on Fridays, with lectures from the professor on Mondays and Tuesdays. Many students opted to miss the Friday sessions, as they did not affect the student's grade. Come the first exam, the professor explains the exam, tells the students to turn their blue books into their TA, and leaves the auditorium. All the TAs gather at the edge of the stage, to monitor the students.

Cue one of the first students to finish. He's walking down the aisle to turn in his blue book, when a slightly panicked look comes over his face. He walks up to one TA--"Are you my TA?" he asks. He'd never been to a discussion session, so he didn't know what his TA looked like, or even what the TA's name was. And of course, none of us knew if he was in our sections, because we'd never seen him, either. We had a stack of 70 or so "homeless" exams that we had to spend half an hour sorting out at the end, because the kids never went to their discussion sections.

Nothing is impossible, the word itself says, “I’m possible!” –Audrey Hepburn


Firecat

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Re: S/O PD Student Darwinism
« Reply #26 on: February 02, 2013, 10:46:52 AM »
A little free advice: If you are so foolish as to buy a paper from one of those websites and turn it in, at least make sure you remove the headers and footers from said website from the document before submitting it. Because if you don't, I promise there will be much giggling at your expense while the academic honesty policy violation is placed on your academic record and the letter notifying you of same is sent.

VorFemme

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Re: S/O PD Student Darwinism
« Reply #27 on: February 02, 2013, 10:51:47 AM »
Yup, something similar happened to me in high school. This kid sitting next to me was copying off my test, to the point that he also copied my (female) name! IIRC, the teacher caught him mid-test and also pointed out the name thing. That's just sort of mind-boggling to me.

I had a guy copy from me on a Home Ec test once in high school. Honestly, I didn't care if he wanted to copy, but I didn't know most of the answers myself so I was just making stuff up. I had to risk getting us both caught to warn him off. He was angry at me afterwards, for leading him astray I suppose, but my position was that he should've known something was up when I listed the three types of white sauce as "Larry, Moe and Curly." Yes, he copied that verbatim.

He might be a lawyer these days, if I remember right.

He probably isn't a cook....if he didn't catch that one earlier.
Let sleeping dragons be.......morning breath......need I say more?

Coley

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Re: S/O PD Student Darwinism
« Reply #28 on: February 02, 2013, 12:30:54 PM »
I teach online undergraduate courses, and I have so many SD stories that it's hard to know where to begin. I'll start with the most recent. I'll preface this by saying that our courses run in eight-week sessions.

Student adds my course on the last day of the add period. Student waits a week to contact me about her late enrollment. Student does not have the textbook. Student's book voucher expired. Student must borrow money from her mother for the book. Student has been terribly ill. Student has the flu. Student says she can't access the online course for two weeks. Student misreads the syllabus and misses the assignment deadlines. Student acquires the book, but claims the print is too small, so she needs an extension because she has to buy reading glasses.

This was one student. It happened this week. After I confirmed that she does have access to the course, her doctor's note doesn't cover her "illnesses," and I informed her that the assignment deadlines are in the syllabus, she proceeded to go over my head to administration to complain that I won't give her an extension for three weeks' worth of work. She also complained that MY textbook's print is too small, and it's not her fault she had to get reading glasses.

Administration contacts me and asks for my input. I send all the e-mail exchanges with the student. I also share that I have confirmed the student's access to the course. I can see everything she has accessed in the course, including the link I've provided to the first chapter of the textbook. It's available free of charge on the publisher's website. And the assignment deadlines are clearly provided to students in the syllabus.

The administration supported me in my decision after confirming what I'd already discovered.

Last night, the student sent me an e-mail to tell me that she had taken her first quiz in the course. She said she just took it to see what it would be like. Now she wishes she had been more prepared. She hasn't seen her grade yet, but she's sure didn't do well.

This is a primer on "How to Start Off on the Wrong Foot" in your course and with your instructor.

Promise

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Re: S/O PD Student Darwinism
« Reply #29 on: February 02, 2013, 01:00:38 PM »
I have a student who had to retake a course from last semester. Since it's the identical course, I made sure to let all students know up front that they are not allowed to use any work from any previous courses for this one. All work had to be new and fresh. Well, I figured this student would try to use answers from last semester for one of the first assignments this semester. And sure enough, this student did. What the student didn't realize is that I have access to all past courses and assignments turned in online. So I checked responses from last semester to this semester, copied and pasted it into the grade feedback section with 0 points given, and then after the next class had a little chat about cheating.