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Author Topic: S/O PD Student Darwinism  (Read 754491 times)

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pwv

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Re: S/O PD Student Darwinism
« Reply #150 on: February 06, 2013, 05:34:50 PM »
This isn't exactly SD but it involves a student.   It happened around 30 years ago when I was attending community college.  Tuition was around $10 a credit.  This was also in the days before cell phones or even pagers were common.

The first night of class the instructor was calling roll but no one answered for the first few names.  The instructor wondered aloud if he even had the correct roll sheet.  Eventually students started answering.

Afterwards, he told us about a class he had had previously.  It was the night of finals and someone from the office came to the room to state that a student had an urgent phone call from his wife.  No one responded to the student's name and upon checking his roll book and grade book the instructor discovered the student had never been to class.

So for around $40 or so, this student got a free night out once a week for 15 weeks.  We were all wondering what would happen later than evening when he came home from "class".

ladyknight1

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  • Not all those who wander are lost
Re: S/O PD Student Darwinism
« Reply #151 on: February 06, 2013, 09:01:51 PM »
At my Forensic Science class tonight, we had several SD candidates.

The young man who sits behind me complained to me and all the students around him about how it is ridiculous and preposterous for the professor to only allow 10 minutes for the weekly quiz. I explained that 80% of my professors had done so, a minute per question is the norm in higher ed! You should have already read the material and studied for the quiz!

Another young man who was collecting his in-class quiz from the week before and complaining that he was going to fail the class. His friend suggested he study before class.

This class meets once a week, I am sure the students can find enough time to study if they try!
“All that is gold does not glitter, Not all those who wander are lost; The old that is strong does not wither, Deep roots are not reached by the frost."
-J.R.R Tolkien

RegionMom

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Re: S/O PD Student Darwinism
« Reply #152 on: February 06, 2013, 09:53:09 PM »
I was a transfer student in seventh grade, and in regular level English, since the school prior was so small we had no levels.  I was SO bored!!  The school had an open classroom concept so I could hear what the advanced class was learning.  Oh how I wanted to be there instead!

But I did not know I could ask to switch, and there were family issues so maybe it was not really an option. 

Anyway, we had to write a short story, weekly.  I rarely received feedback so I began to wonder if she was even reading mine, since I was a proven "Pick me, teacher, I know the answer!" always read ahead kind of student and she needed to focus on the others in the class that needed basic help.

I began to copy tv  and movie plots, including one of the stories from "Twilight Zone, The Movie."  Not even a glimmer of questioning from her.

Another week or so, and I claimed to have lost my paper on the bus or somewhere, when in reality, I did not write it.  She still gave me full marks because I was such an attentive and conscientious student.

Come eighth grade, we moved again to another school, and I was placed in advanced English.  Oh the joy!  I was finally amongst my people!!  I never fudged a story again.

And I just realized that not another living soul has heard my seventh grade story. 
Do I get a pass now? 

I actually coach creative writing as a volunteer to students that wish to enter a timed on-site writing contest.  I have taken students to win at local and district and even state level!
 :D
Fear is temporary...Regret is forever.

Lynn2000

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Re: S/O PD Student Darwinism
« Reply #153 on: February 07, 2013, 09:25:14 AM »
All of these are grad students:

--The one who downloaded (legal) porn onto work computers. I think he wasn't found out until after he'd left.
--The one who let his friends into someone else's office late at night so they could play against each other in online video games, with each being in a different room at the work building.
--The one who, upon receiving a brand new laptop for work, promptly sold his personal computer and loaded all his video games onto his work computer, so he could play them (solo, at least!) when he stayed late at work. He also downloaded whatever Internet gadgets caught his fancy onto the work computer, resulting in it having to be wiped twice because it malfunctioned.

Sad to say, all of these people received their degrees anyway.
~Lynn2000

camlan

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Re: S/O PD Student Darwinism
« Reply #154 on: February 07, 2013, 09:48:43 AM »
I was a transfer student in seventh grade, and in regular level English, since the school prior was so small we had no levels.  I was SO bored!!  The school had an open classroom concept so I could hear what the advanced class was learning.  Oh how I wanted to be there instead!

But I did not know I could ask to switch, and there were family issues so maybe it was not really an option. 

Anyway, we had to write a short story, weekly.  I rarely received feedback so I began to wonder if she was even reading mine, since I was a proven "Pick me, teacher, I know the answer!" always read ahead kind of student and she needed to focus on the others in the class that needed basic help.

I began to copy tv  and movie plots, including one of the stories from "Twilight Zone, The Movie."  Not even a glimmer of questioning from her.

Another week or so, and I claimed to have lost my paper on the bus or somewhere, when in reality, I did not write it.  She still gave me full marks because I was such an attentive and conscientious student.

Come eighth grade, we moved again to another school, and I was placed in advanced English.  Oh the joy!  I was finally amongst my people!!  I never fudged a story again.

And I just realized that not another living soul has heard my seventh grade story. 
Do I get a pass now? 

I actually coach creative writing as a volunteer to students that wish to enter a timed on-site writing contest.  I have taken students to win at local and district and even state level!
 :D

Ah, the teachers who aid and abet wrongdoing with their students. I had one in second grade. Wonderful teacher, but got me started on a very bad habit.

Here's my second grade story. My teacher would write out questions for each reading group on the blackboard. We'd sit and write out the answers. If you finished answering the questions, you were allowed to pick a book from the classroom library and sit quietly and read until the rest of the class was done.

I was in the top reading group. Mrs. Gold knew perfectly well that I knew all the answers to the questions. (In second grade I was reading and comprehending a few grade levels above second grade, to the point where I was reading my brother's books, and he was in sixth grade.) So when I started not answering all the questions, just the first few, and then would go and get a book to read instead, she didn't call me on it. She let me not finish the assignment! So I'd sit and read for 20 minutes while the rest of the class worked.

This was not good in establishing good study habits, let me tell you. I never read when I wasn't supposed to in any other class, ever, but I did have a hard time doing my homework and class assignments first, and doing my fun reading second, all the way through college.

Mrs. Gold was a wonderful teacher and I remember her fondly. It's only as an adult that I wish she had been a bit more strict with me.
Nothing is impossible, the word itself says, “I’m possible!” –Audrey Hepburn


darling

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Re: S/O PD Student Darwinism
« Reply #155 on: February 07, 2013, 11:11:17 AM »
Here is a case in progress (from the Chronicles of Higher Education Forums):

One of my students is a ringer!]http://chronicle.com/forums/index.php/topic,126029.0.html]One of my students is a ringer!

Quote
I'm reasonably certain that one of my students has hired someone else to take my class for him.

We can look at students' photos through the registration system, so the first thing I noticed was that the guy in my class - let's call him Jake - looked nothing like his registration picture. Now, I am not the best at telling people apart, but usually this means people look more similar to me, not less similar. The registration photo guy (the Real Jake) has straight (faux-hawked) light-brown hair (including eyebrows and stubble). The in-class guy (Fake Jake?) has black curly hair, black eyebrows, and black stubble. Their faces also look completely dissimilar to me.

I talked to a trusted real professor in my department, and he suggested that I check IDs at today's exam (passing this off as standard procedure for our department). Out of about 30 students, two did not have IDs with them - one of them was Fake Jake. I said, "That's fine, just bring it in on Tuesday."

While they were taking their exams, I snapped a photo of him with my phone. (Yes, that feels a little shady.) Upon closer examination, the two photos still look nothing alike.

I considered that this guy's registration photo may simply be the wrong photo somehow, like maybe there was a mixup. There is a guy on FB who goes to my school, has the same name as my student, and looks like the registration photo, and nothing like the guy in my class. So unless there are two guys at my school with this name, and somehow their registration photos got mixed up, and then just coincidentally this guy also didn't have his wallet with him in class....yeah. I think he's a ringer.

I'm going to talk to my trusted professor friend tomorrow and see what he makes of all this, but have you had a situation like this?

As the posts become more recent, the evidence is definitely confirming that the OP's hunch is most likely correct!

NyaChan

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Re: S/O PD Student Darwinism
« Reply #156 on: February 07, 2013, 11:53:38 AM »
Here is a case in progress (from the Chronicles of Higher Education Forums):

One of my students is a ringer!]http://chronicle.com/forums/index.php/topic,126029.0.html]One of my students is a ringer!

Quote
I'm reasonably certain that one of my students has hired someone else to take my class for him.

We can look at students' photos through the registration system, so the first thing I noticed was that the guy in my class - let's call him Jake - looked nothing like his registration picture. Now, I am not the best at telling people apart, but usually this means people look more similar to me, not less similar. The registration photo guy (the Real Jake) has straight (faux-hawked) light-brown hair (including eyebrows and stubble). The in-class guy (Fake Jake?) has black curly hair, black eyebrows, and black stubble. Their faces also look completely dissimilar to me.

I talked to a trusted real professor in my department, and he suggested that I check IDs at today's exam (passing this off as standard procedure for our department). Out of about 30 students, two did not have IDs with them - one of them was Fake Jake. I said, "That's fine, just bring it in on Tuesday."

While they were taking their exams, I snapped a photo of him with my phone. (Yes, that feels a little shady.) Upon closer examination, the two photos still look nothing alike.

I considered that this guy's registration photo may simply be the wrong photo somehow, like maybe there was a mixup. There is a guy on FB who goes to my school, has the same name as my student, and looks like the registration photo, and nothing like the guy in my class. So unless there are two guys at my school with this name, and somehow their registration photos got mixed up, and then just coincidentally this guy also didn't have his wallet with him in class....yeah. I think he's a ringer.

I'm going to talk to my trusted professor friend tomorrow and see what he makes of all this, but have you had a situation like this?

As the posts become more recent, the evidence is definitely confirming that the OP's hunch is most likely correct!

That is a really interesting story.  I plan to keep an eye on that - I want to hear what happens to FakeJake & RealJake :)

SeptGurl

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Re: S/O PD Student Darwinism
« Reply #157 on: February 07, 2013, 01:05:27 PM »
Here is a case in progress (from the Chronicles of Higher Education Forums):

One of my students is a ringer!]http://chronicle.com/forums/index.php/topic,126029.0.html]One of my students is a ringer!

Quote
I'm reasonably certain that one of my students has hired someone else to take my class for him.

We can look at students' photos through the registration system, so the first thing I noticed was that the guy in my class - let's call him Jake - looked nothing like his registration picture. Now, I am not the best at telling people apart, but usually this means people look more similar to me, not less similar. The registration photo guy (the Real Jake) has straight (faux-hawked) light-brown hair (including eyebrows and stubble). The in-class guy (Fake Jake?) has black curly hair, black eyebrows, and black stubble. Their faces also look completely dissimilar to me.

I talked to a trusted real professor in my department, and he suggested that I check IDs at today's exam (passing this off as standard procedure for our department). Out of about 30 students, two did not have IDs with them - one of them was Fake Jake. I said, "That's fine, just bring it in on Tuesday."

While they were taking their exams, I snapped a photo of him with my phone. (Yes, that feels a little shady.) Upon closer examination, the two photos still look nothing alike.

I considered that this guy's registration photo may simply be the wrong photo somehow, like maybe there was a mixup. There is a guy on FB who goes to my school, has the same name as my student, and looks like the registration photo, and nothing like the guy in my class. So unless there are two guys at my school with this name, and somehow their registration photos got mixed up, and then just coincidentally this guy also didn't have his wallet with him in class....yeah. I think he's a ringer.

I'm going to talk to my trusted professor friend tomorrow and see what he makes of all this, but have you had a situation like this?

As the posts become more recent, the evidence is definitely confirming that the OP's hunch is most likely correct!

Ooooh ... Thanks for the link. This is a great story. I'll be following it!

Sebastienne

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Re: S/O PD Student Darwinism
« Reply #158 on: February 07, 2013, 01:20:26 PM »
That thread is amazing. Although if/when consequences to rain down, they'll probably only fall on Real Jake--unless they can uncover the identity of Fake Jake, which seems unlikely.

SeptGurl

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  • Formerly Coley
Re: S/O PD Student Darwinism
« Reply #159 on: February 07, 2013, 03:03:00 PM »
That thread is amazing. Although if/when consequences to rain down, they'll probably only fall on Real Jake--unless they can uncover the identity of Fake Jake, which seems unlikely.

You're probably right. DH had a situation similar to this with an online student a while back. Evidently, the student hired someone in another city to take the class for him. Then the real student failed to pay the fake student for his work. The fake student retaliated by reporting the real student to the college. It was fairly easy to figure out from the IP addresses that the fake student's story was true.

Initially, the real student denied the situation. But when confronted with all the evidence, he had to admit it. He hired the imposter because he was too busy with his job and his family to do the work himself.

bopper

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Re: S/O PD Student Darwinism
« Reply #160 on: February 07, 2013, 03:25:30 PM »



Ah, the teachers who aid and abet wrongdoing with their students. I had one in second grade. Wonderful teacher, but got me started on a very bad habit.

Here's my second grade story. My teacher would write out questions for each reading group on the blackboard. We'd sit and write out the answers. If you finished answering the questions, you were allowed to pick a book from the classroom library and sit quietly and read until the rest of the class was done.

I was in the top reading group. Mrs. Gold knew perfectly well that I knew all the answers to the questions. (In second grade I was reading and comprehending a few grade levels above second grade, to the point where I was reading my brother's books, and he was in sixth grade.) So when I started not answering all the questions, just the first few, and then would go and get a book to read instead, she didn't call me on it. She let me not finish the assignment! So I'd sit and read for 20 minutes while the rest of the class worked.

This was not good in establishing good study habits, let me tell you. I never read when I wasn't supposed to in any other class, ever, but I did have a hard time doing my homework and class assignments first, and doing my fun reading second, all the way through college.

Mrs. Gold was a wonderful teacher and I remember her fondly. It's only as an adult that I wish she had been a bit more strict with me.

Or perhaps she knew that for you, reading a book was teaching you more than writing down the answers to the questions would!

EveLGenius

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Re: S/O PD Student Darwinism
« Reply #161 on: February 08, 2013, 05:45:14 PM »
I used to give my students the standard "Cheating is Illegal, Immoral, and Fattening" lecture every year, and they of course mostly slept through it, until I started giving examples.  Like the time my friend was proctoring an exam, and saw a flash of color.  Upon inspection, it was a person who'd written cheat-sheets on 8 1/2 x 11" notebook paper, in five-color magic marker.  Or the person who failed a test taken on a scan-tron form, erased her answers, and then tried to claim that the form was mis-marked.  Well, a) she hadn't erased fully, and b) the professor had experienced this before, and photocopied all of the graded forms before handing them back.  But the one that got everyone's attention was the time I said that I had seen the cheater in the act of cheating, but did nothing to stop him.  Because, you see, the C student was copying off of the F student's paper.  For some reason, I almost always got one person to say out loud, "That's just mean!"

The last line of that lecture was always, "I will make it so hard for you to cheat that it will actually be easier just to do the work."

EveLGenius

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Re: S/O PD Student Darwinism
« Reply #162 on: February 08, 2013, 05:46:46 PM »
Forgot to mention a time that I was proctoring someone else's exam.  I told the students that hats must be off their heads and under their desks, because I knew six ways to cheat using a hat.  After the exam, a student came up, turned in his test, put his hat back on, and said expectantly, "I only know five..."

I said, "Good!"

snowfire

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Re: S/O PD Student Darwinism
« Reply #163 on: February 08, 2013, 05:52:00 PM »
Because, you see, the C student was copying off of the F student's paper.  For some reason, I almost always got one person to say out loud, "That's just mean!"

 >:D  I love this.  It is a prime example of "crime doesn't pay."  ;D  Sometimes the Karma Fairy works overtime.

Lynn2000

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Re: S/O PD Student Darwinism
« Reply #164 on: February 08, 2013, 05:52:28 PM »
Here's one I heard from a professor who was giving a speech. He was a philosophy professor, very "there are no wrong answers to anything." He said he used to explain this to his class at the beginning of each semester, and say glibly that the only way you could fail his class was to insult his wife. One semester there was a student who remained on the roster, but never turned in any assignments or showed up for exams. On the day of the final exam he came to class and turned in a sheet of paper that said, "Dear Professor Smith, I never insulted your wife." I think the professor gave him a D- for sheer chutzpah. But I think he also stopped making that particular comment to his class. ;)
~Lynn2000