Author Topic: S/O PD Student Darwinism  (Read 232367 times)

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amandaelizabeth

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Re: S/O PD Student Darwinism
« Reply #60 on: February 03, 2013, 09:49:17 PM »
Whiterose wrote "- had me read and summarize a book for her once. It ended up benefiting me, since not only the book was awesome, but nowadays I booktalk it often and have used it as part of summer reading boxes." .................

.................and the book was ?

iridaceae

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Re: S/O PD Student Darwinism
« Reply #61 on: February 04, 2013, 01:46:41 AM »
My father had a colleague for a while whose wife got kicked out of the PhD program she was in because they caught her plagiarizing. Since this would have been about 1959 I'm guessing it was a major work or one of her advisor's papers she was plagiarizing.

whiterose

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Re: S/O PD Student Darwinism
« Reply #62 on: February 04, 2013, 07:03:43 AM »
The book was called "Esperanza Rising".

Yes, a Juvenile Fiction book. At the tween level. We were both college students in our early 20s by then.

Sad thing is, had she gone to an easier school, she most likely would have succeeded, and possibly even excelled. But she was admitted to our state's flagship university under lower standards on purpose- not sure how else to put it without opening a can of worms- and it was way too much for her.

But she overall was the kind of person who liked other people doing the work for her, taking care of things for her, and mainly giving her things and doing favors to her without her reciprocating.
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jaxsue

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Re: S/O PD Student Darwinism
« Reply #63 on: February 04, 2013, 07:21:03 AM »
Taking credit for others' work extends into the working world, no surprise there. I am considering doing blogging for business websites (a friend is trying to talk me into doing his to start with).

According to him, there is a derth of original stuff out there. People have no qualms about using others' blogs and signing their names to them  :-\


SCAJAfamily

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Re: S/O PD Student Darwinism
« Reply #64 on: February 04, 2013, 11:00:48 AM »
I'll offer myself as a freshman in HS.  I wrote an english paper and a friend asked if she could look at it "for ideas" the day before.  I gave it to her and got it back on time.  Afterwards, the teacher called us both in.  It turns out she copied it word for word.  Since he didn't know whom to believe, we both got a zero.  I just about had a heart attack because I really wanted an A in the class and had to work really hard to get it.  I told my parents and they just chalked up to inexperience. 

This was a private HS and the friend got kicked out halfway through sophomore year.  I don't know what for.  But probably for cheating since she asked me a few times again afterwards to look at my work "for ideas".  Yeah right!
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Lynn2000

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Re: S/O PD Student Darwinism
« Reply #65 on: February 04, 2013, 11:16:11 AM »
I went to a pretty small high school (about 450 people in the entire school, four grades). There was an honors/college prep track, which I was in, but since they didn't want that track to have just ten people in it, they broadened it to include a number of people who probably shouldn't have been there. Sorry, that sounds really snotty; I think most of them had the brains to do well, but a lot of them had attitude issues. Like the kid who hurled bowling balls across all the lanes when we did bowling in PE, or the kid who spent all day answering teachers' questions in a high-pitched voice because he was trying to fulfill a lost bet, or the kid who was happily known as Meathead. My favorite example:

The English teacher told us to turn our essays in by the end of the day or they'd be late. If she had gone home already, we could slip them under the (locked) door of her classroom and she'd pick them up in the morning. Todd immediately said, "Well, how would you know if we turned it in by the end of the day, what if someone came in early in the morning and slipped it under your door instead?"  ::) I thought he was just doing his usual mouthing off; but then he really decided to test it! He actually had the paper done on time, but instead of turning it in he just went home. Then he came back to school at 6am, thinking he would slip it under her door then and, I don't know, bask in his superiority? Of course, what happened was that the school building was locked and he couldn't get in! He made a big fuss and finally the janitor arrived to let him in, but by that time he was too late--the teacher had arrived by another door and already gone up to her room and collected the essays. So he had to turn his in late.
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Coley

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Re: S/O PD Student Darwinism
« Reply #66 on: February 04, 2013, 11:27:01 AM »
I'll offer myself as a freshman in HS.  I wrote an english paper and a friend asked if she could look at it "for ideas" the day before.  I gave it to her and got it back on time.  Afterwards, the teacher called us both in.  It turns out she copied it word for word.  Since he didn't know whom to believe, we both got a zero.  I just about had a heart attack because I really wanted an A in the class and had to work really hard to get it.  I told my parents and they just chalked up to inexperience. 

This was a private HS and the friend got kicked out halfway through sophomore year.  I don't know what for.  But probably for cheating since she asked me a few times again afterwards to look at my work "for ideas".  Yeah right!

I had a similar situation with two students. One student took my course in the spring session. The other student enrolled in the fall session. Apparently, the spring student let the fall student have her research paper "for ideas." The fall student copied portions of the spring student's paper verbatim and turned it in to me. The fall session student got a zero and then protested mightily about the unfairness of it all. I turned the whole thing in to our Student Affairs department, who took disciplinary action against both students.

I also have had situations with members of the same family taking my courses in different terms and trying to share their work. I had a married couple try that about a year ago. It didn't work. The funny thing was that they tried it twice. It didn't also work the second time.

About 6 months ago, a woman was enrolled in my section of the course and her DH was in another instructor's section of the same course. They were collaborating. The other instructor and I caught them. Both were referred for disciplinary action. The wife protested that she wasn't doing anything wrong, but the evidence was there. She finally admitted it. She also failed my course because of it, which delayed her graduation.

Right now, I have three students in one class who have the same last name. Two of them also have the same first name, but one is using a common nickname for that first name. And they all live at the same address. I'm watching them like a hawk. I already have caught them with some unusual behavior on exams, and I have warned them that I am watching.

SpottedPony

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Re: S/O PD Student Darwinism
« Reply #67 on: February 04, 2013, 11:35:19 AM »
About half way through my first semester at an Equestrian College, several members of the senior class thought it would be funny to turn random horses out together in the large main arena.  Only one had an injury bad enough that it had to be put on stall rest.  However, that particular horse was one that was to be used in a demonstration ride being put on by the school's instructors at the Quarter Horse Congress, a really big deal horse show.  They had been working for weeks on this presentation and having to work another horse into it messed the routine up for them.  The students involved were expelled just a few weeks from their graduation.

At the graduation exercises, the graduating students would do group riding demonstrations according to their class and discipline. My group was assembled, warmed up and waiting for our turn to perform, when the one guy in the group was pulled out, and we had to do our demonstration without him.  It seems he was spotted breaking into the school's snack bar.  He too was expelled. 

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Re: S/O PD Student Darwinism
« Reply #68 on: February 04, 2013, 11:57:25 AM »
I'll offer myself as a freshman in HS.  I wrote an english paper and a friend asked if she could look at it "for ideas" the day before.  I gave it to her and got it back on time.  Afterwards, the teacher called us both in.  It turns out she copied it word for word.  Since he didn't know whom to believe, we both got a zero.  I just about had a heart attack because I really wanted an A in the class and had to work really hard to get it.  I told my parents and they just chalked up to inexperience. 

This was a private HS and the friend got kicked out halfway through sophomore year.  I don't know what for.  But probably for cheating since she asked me a few times again afterwards to look at my work "for ideas".  Yeah right!

This brought back an unpleasant memory about grade school. A boy in my class asked to borrow my science homework to "check his answers" during the recess before the class in which it was due.  ::) Yes I know it seems ridiculously obvious NOW, but I was young and naive enough to think that 1) since I would never think of cheating, neither would anyone else especially one of the 'nicer' boys and 2) even if he was less than honest, he wouldn't bother cheating on such an easy assignment worth so little of our total grade. He was standing on the playground, basically copying my answers. The teacher (an old and very strict nun) saw him, took both the papers and tore them up! I started to cry. We had to pay for replacement copies and redo them. My dad talked to the teacher and she admitted that she didn't know it was my paper until she tore them and saw the look on my face, and she knew I wasn't a cheater (I was teased for being a teacher's pet - I didn't suck up I was just smart and well-behaved, which as you know is a punishable offense as far as your peers are concerned). She basically knew my only crime was being too nice and trusting, but she had to enforce the rules. At least the assignment was easy to redo and I don't think I got marked late for it either. But I never showed anyone my papers or notes ever again! >:(
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Lynn2000

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Re: S/O PD Student Darwinism
« Reply #69 on: February 04, 2013, 12:20:15 PM »
People raise a lot of fuss about plagiarism and cheating, as they should, but I think a lot of the stories on here show that it's not quite as black and white as a lot of authorities would like to pretend. I think it can actually be very slippery where the line lies between "collaborating" or "doing homework together" and "cheating." For example, in morning study hall in high school, I liked to check my math homework answers with another girl in my class who usually got things right. She was concerned that letting me see her homework constituted cheating. Of course it could have, if I were the type of person who would just copy down someone else's answers without thinking about them. But instead, if I found that my answer differed from hers, I would point it out, and we would both go back over our work to see if we'd made an error somewhere. Sometimes neither of us could find an error so we'd just leave our original answers, knowing one of them was wrong but not knowing which one. Plus, it was math, so we had to "show our work" on the page--not that the teacher necessarily studied every student's work for every problem, but the evidence would be right there if we magically leaped to an answer that our work didn't support. If anyone had ever questioned our behavior--which they didn't--I would have said all this, and frankly found it ridiculous if someone in authority told me that was still considered cheating.

On the other hand, I learned early on not to agree to "help" a lot of other students with their homework--say, people who never spoke to me otherwise--because I knew that meant they wanted me to do it for them, or just copy off mine. I don't remember any particular bad experience that led to this knowledge, though.
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NyaChan

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Re: S/O PD Student Darwinism
« Reply #70 on: February 04, 2013, 12:32:02 PM »
This class should have resulted in a whole epidemic of Student Darwinism, spanning years of students,  but did not.

A professor teaching a class in my Honors Program gave a multiple choice exam that was made from the same pool of questions every. single. year.  They might be in a different order, they might be one or two new questions, but other than that, they were the same questions pulled from the past exams.  The exam was also incredibly hard and impossible to do well on from just studying even with the "study guides" the professor gave the class (I looked at them and the exam, there was no way you could answer those questions with just that guide).  Over the years, each preceding class' kind students would bequeath the last year's exam to the new students.  Any students who couldn't find a willing upperclassman would get a horrific grade in that class.  There were students that did great from the start having already obtained the old exams, some that had bombed the first exam and then caved on their morals and used old exams to study for the rest of the semester, and then those poor clueless students who cried over receiving their first ever C's, D's & F's while unaware that everyone else's A's were from cheating. 

The professor either didn't know at all or knew and didn't care.  I suspect that it was the former because my roommate who did use old exams to study after getting a very bad grade on the first exam was consulted by the professor after class along with another student who was upset over two bad grades and unsure of what they were doing wrong and the professor asked roommate to share how she had studied to improve her score the second time around.  As roommate wasn't failed, I'm guessing he bought the "I read all the reading over again and memorized the study guides" line.

Outdoor Girl

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Re: S/O PD Student Darwinism
« Reply #71 on: February 04, 2013, 12:43:53 PM »
My Dad is undiagnosed dyslexic.  He did his Bachelor of Arts in night school, mainly because it was the only degree he could do night school.  He was a teacher, who went to one year of teacher's college right after high school and started teaching right away.  A degree would allow him to progress and allow for him to achieve a higher salary.

He would read specific passages the prof mentioned, he'd read the Coles notes, and if it was crucial that the entire book needed to be read, my mother would read it for him and give him a synopsis.  He did all the assignments and wrote all the exams on his own so I don't think they did anything really wrong.

Dad was 19 when he started teaching.  He was substitute teaching and was assigned a girls' gym class.  Some of them were as old as 16.  Fortunately, they didn't realize how old he was!

And his claim to fame?  He took a class with Alex Trebec.  'Greek and Roman Classics in Translation'.  I'd love to get on Jeopardy, just so I could tell him that in my little blurb.   :)
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siamesecat2965

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Re: S/O PD Student Darwinism
« Reply #72 on: February 04, 2013, 12:50:55 PM »
Young teacher my last three years of high school.  After I graduated, he married one of the students in my class (I ran into them some fifteen years later, still married, with children, and working together in a small business).  He was fired immediately - apparently whether or not he started dating her after graduation or before, he wasn't allowed to marry a former student some five or six years his junior (she would have started as a freshman about the time he started his first or second year of teaching).  And there might have been some other (non-PC) background to it, thirty-odd years ago.  She was a blonde cheerleader type - he was a very good looking Latino - think "Ricky Ricardo" without the drums......

This apparently happened at the other jr. high in my town, although I didn't know about it until a couple of years ago, and I've been out of HS for almost 30 years!  There was some chatter about a male teacher who was a bit too friendly with some of the female students, and made them uncomfortable. This would have been 7-9th grades too, not HS.  So the students in question would have been about 13-15, and the teacher, maybe a few years out of college, so 10-12 years age difference, at a minimum.

Anyway, i guess there was one girl who was ok with his "attention" - and I don't know if anything untoward ever happened, or what, or what, if anything happened once we moved to the HS, but she ended up marrying him, they are still married ,and have kids. I'm guessing it was after she graduated from college, but I don't know when she started d@ting him.

But apparently they live near another classmate, who had been the subject of his attentions back then, and she still finds him creepy. Also, someone else mentioned that her mother was quite ashamed of her and the whole situation. So while it sounds like they got together once she was out of school, there still remains some speculation.

Outdoor Girl

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Re: S/O PD Student Darwinism
« Reply #73 on: February 04, 2013, 12:55:25 PM »
Back when I was in high school, we still had Grade 13.  The students in that grade would be 18, 19.  One of my English teachers was a young guy right out of teacher's college.  He was 23, 24.  Apparently, he was dating one of the Grade 13 girls, not a student he had ever had or would ever have in his class.  He was told that either he broke it off or lose his job.  He broke it off.

I don't know what happened after she graduated.
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Shalamar

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Re: S/O PD Student Darwinism
« Reply #74 on: February 04, 2013, 01:25:30 PM »
My best friend was dating our math teacher when we were in Grade 12.  She was 17, he was (I think) in his early 30's.    The faculty didn't know, of course, otherwise he probably would've been fired, and her parents didn't know, either.   That said - it seemed like everyone else knew.  At graduation time, one of the students giving a speech said "We all knew that the best way to pass Mr. Brown's math class was to be a cute girl - right, (Best Friend's Name)?"  Yikes.