Author Topic: S/O PD Student Darwinism  (Read 182818 times)

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kherbert05

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Re: S/O PD Student Darwinism
« Reply #210 on: February 11, 2013, 08:18:46 PM »
goodness me can you imagine if a teacher "gasp" had children or "double gasp" was pregnant!!!!!!!elvenety! the corruption to our youth would be complete.

It does both infuriate and amuse me that people have the idea that teachers are not human.


Because of some other things I've started to wonder a comment from my principal had to do with this thinking. He kept asking me about my kids. I thought he meant my students - no he made it very clear he thought I had children and was hiding the fact because I'm single.


He made that assumption because I had a car seat and booster seat in my car. At the time my BIL was working further out than I did, and Sis had a couple of things happen at work (became violently ill and was stalked and threatened by a patient's wife/girlfriend). So I was back up for picking up the kids.


Last couple of years he started pushing his religion down our throats, which has made me question the exchange.
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jemma

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Re: S/O PD Student Darwinism
« Reply #211 on: February 11, 2013, 08:27:47 PM »
A new one, just in this morning:

A student decided to triple dip on her use of a paper. In this case, the paper was submitted as a draft for my review.

One of the tools we use for reviewing papers is a web-based program that screens students' papers for originality. This student's draft paper returned a report of 100%, which means that it has been submitted before. I discovered that she apparently had an assignment due last night in her English course that required her to summarize a news article. The paper she wrote for my course required her to use journal articles, which she paraphrased in the paper. It seems she decided to save herself some time and effort, so she submitted this paper for the assignments in both courses.

First, she gets a SD award for submitting the paper to her other course first. Because of the originality report, I can document that the paper isn't original to my course, so she will have to rewrite it completely in order to receive any credit. Since she submitted it as a draft, I'm taking 50% off the top of her final version because she tried to double dip. She will have to rework the whole paper if she wants to receive any credit for it.

But that's not all. I discovered that she has earned an extra-special SD commendation for triple dipping. Not only did she submit the same paper to both her courses this term, but she also used the same paper she wrote when she first took my course last fall. You see, this is her second time around in my course. She failed the course with another instructor and is repeating it with me now. The instructor for her English course will clearly see from the originality report that the student recycled the paper from a previous term. This is highlighted by the fact that she left my course's title on the paper when she submitted it to her English instructor. Reusing a paper twice from a course she failed gives her the Gold Star SD designation.

In addition to her SD awards and commendations, she also earns a free pass to Student Affairs for disciplinary action.

I'm not sure how this is plagiarism if she wrote the original.  I handed in the same final paper for two classes, though I did consult with the professors in advance, and slightly rewrote the introduction and conclusion for topicality.  If the work is good I think she should be allowed to get away with this.

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Re: S/O PD Student Darwinism
« Reply #212 on: February 11, 2013, 08:44:47 PM »
A new one, just in this morning:

A student decided to triple dip on her use of a paper. In this case, the paper was submitted as a draft for my review.

One of the tools we use for reviewing papers is a web-based program that screens students' papers for originality. This student's draft paper returned a report of 100%, which means that it has been submitted before. I discovered that she apparently had an assignment due last night in her English course that required her to summarize a news article. The paper she wrote for my course required her to use journal articles, which she paraphrased in the paper. It seems she decided to save herself some time and effort, so she submitted this paper for the assignments in both courses.

First, she gets a SD award for submitting the paper to her other course first. Because of the originality report, I can document that the paper isn't original to my course, so she will have to rewrite it completely in order to receive any credit. Since she submitted it as a draft, I'm taking 50% off the top of her final version because she tried to double dip. She will have to rework the whole paper if she wants to receive any credit for it.

But that's not all. I discovered that she has earned an extra-special SD commendation for triple dipping. Not only did she submit the same paper to both her courses this term, but she also used the same paper she wrote when she first took my course last fall. You see, this is her second time around in my course. She failed the course with another instructor and is repeating it with me now. The instructor for her English course will clearly see from the originality report that the student recycled the paper from a previous term. This is highlighted by the fact that she left my course's title on the paper when she submitted it to her English instructor. Reusing a paper twice from a course she failed gives her the Gold Star SD designation.

In addition to her SD awards and commendations, she also earns a free pass to Student Affairs for disciplinary action.

I'm not sure how this is plagiarism if she wrote the original.  I handed in the same final paper for two classes, though I did consult with the professors in advance, and slightly rewrote the introduction and conclusion for topicality.  If the work is good I think she should be allowed to get away with this.

Where I work, submitting the same work for more than one class (or attempt at a class, in the case of retaking a class) is academic dishonesty, and is explicitly mentioned in the honesty policy. Students are expected to produce original work for each class; if previous work is used in any way, the student is expected to cite it properly; it's a very serious offense to do otherwise.

Basically, when a student turns in work for a class, they are expected to have produced the work for that class. So no, I don't think the student should be allowed to get away with this. In your case, you at least consulted with the professors and got permission in advance...since you did, I wouldn't call that dishonesty.

kherbert05

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Re: S/O PD Student Darwinism
« Reply #213 on: February 11, 2013, 08:58:32 PM »
I think I'm going to SD myself out of this English class. I just can't bring myself to write this paper. It's supposed to be a "research paper" but we have to use 3 of 4 articles she supplied, discussing gender bias in education/workplaces.

The 1st article basically says that women are now more educated than men, so now men won't marry the rich, successful women because of their wounded pride.
Quote
When there are three women for every two men graduating from college, whom will the third woman marry?
One of the teacher's discussion questions was Explain why men are unwilling to marry a woman who cannot or will not hold down a job. Then, when I gave my perspective, as a SAHM, she wouldn't call on me for the rest of the class.

Article #2's main idea is that female authors are extremely underrepresented in classical literature, proving that sexism is alive and well in modern America.

Article #3 says that men make more $ in the same job than women, and that 'woman work' is paid less than 'manly work.' The example they used was truck driver wages vs elementary school teacher's wages. Um, truck drivers are paid by private companies/institutions and teachers are paid by taxes. Also, long-haul truck drivers who drive cross country and are on the road for days/weeks at a time get paid more because it sucks to never be home and fewer people are willing to do it. I feel that the two jobs are not very comparable.

#4 actually quotes the Old Testament and points out that a man's offering was set at 50 shekels, whereas a woman's was 30. So, women have been worth less than men since Biblical times, and don't expect it to change anytime soon.

This two page assignment is due in 3.5 hours, and I've got nothing.
It wouldn't be called Manhood, Womanhood, and Public Life would it? Sounds like my Freshman Symposium class. I totally ticked off one of the teachers.


She said when you were a child and thought that all scientists were men....


I interrupted her and said "Actually all the scientists I knew as a child were women. My Mom was a research scientist and most of the people she worked with were women."


In 3rd grade I told my teacher that Doctors weren't the bosses. That they only did what the research scientists told them and the nurses make sure the doctors don't mess up. She didn't like that either. The Dad/doctor doing the career day talk thought it was hilarious. Mom did explain to the Dad/doctor that earlier that year an ER nurse stopped the ER doc from giving me some medication that I don't react well to. He already knew she was a scientist.)
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AnnaJ

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Re: S/O PD Student Darwinism
« Reply #214 on: February 11, 2013, 09:57:25 PM »
A new one, just in this morning:

A student decided to triple dip on her use of a paper. In this case, the paper was submitted as a draft for my review.

One of the tools we use for reviewing papers is a web-based program that screens students' papers for originality. This student's draft paper returned a report of 100%, which means that it has been submitted before. I discovered that she apparently had an assignment due last night in her English course that required her to summarize a news article. The paper she wrote for my course required her to use journal articles, which she paraphrased in the paper. It seems she decided to save herself some time and effort, so she submitted this paper for the assignments in both courses.

First, she gets a SD award for submitting the paper to her other course first. Because of the originality report, I can document that the paper isn't original to my course, so she will have to rewrite it completely in order to receive any credit. Since she submitted it as a draft, I'm taking 50% off the top of her final version because she tried to double dip. She will have to rework the whole paper if she wants to receive any credit for it.

But that's not all. I discovered that she has earned an extra-special SD commendation for triple dipping. Not only did she submit the same paper to both her courses this term, but she also used the same paper she wrote when she first took my course last fall. You see, this is her second time around in my course. She failed the course with another instructor and is repeating it with me now. The instructor for her English course will clearly see from the originality report that the student recycled the paper from a previous term. This is highlighted by the fact that she left my course's title on the paper when she submitted it to her English instructor. Reusing a paper twice from a course she failed gives her the Gold Star SD designation.

In addition to her SD awards and commendations, she also earns a free pass to Student Affairs for disciplinary action.

I'm not sure how this is plagiarism if she wrote the original.  I handed in the same final paper for two classes, though I did consult with the professors in advance, and slightly rewrote the introduction and conclusion for topicality.  If the work is good I think she should be allowed to get away with this.

Where I work, submitting the same work for more than one class (or attempt at a class, in the case of retaking a class) is academic dishonesty, and is explicitly mentioned in the honesty policy. Students are expected to produce original work for each class; if previous work is used in any way, the student is expected to cite it properly; it's a very serious offense to do otherwise.

Basically, when a student turns in work for a class, they are expected to have produced the work for that class. So no, I don't think the student should be allowed to get away with this. In your case, you at least consulted with the professors and got permission in advance...since you did, I wouldn't call that dishonesty.

Yep, plagiarism at my school too.   The expectation, as Firecat says, is that students should be writing fresh papers for their classes; it doesn't matter whether the work is good or not, they should be doing the work required for that class. 

You asked permission and your professors were OK with it, which eliminates the concern about plagiarism.

Garden Goblin

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Re: S/O PD Student Darwinism
« Reply #215 on: February 11, 2013, 11:18:05 PM »
You could do an analysis of the number of female authors in proportion to male authors, and the percentage of female authors who are represented today vs the percentage of the known male writers who are represented.  Last time I did this there was something like 90-odd percent of known female writers who are studied in universities today vs less than 10 percent of known male writers.  Tell me again who's under-represented? Granted this was over a decade ago, but there was a point there I was trying to prove, but don't want to get too far into it so as not to cross the threshold of political talk.

Unless that analysis includes a look at the reasons why it is so much more difficult for women to get published in the first place (unless they are writing fluff pieces like Twilight), it won't be adequate.  Any members of the SFWA paying attention to the current SFWA election could probably give you pages and pages of help on this topic.  It probably won't all be polite though.
« Last Edit: February 11, 2013, 11:21:24 PM by Garden Goblin »

Lauds

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Re: S/O PD Student Darwinism
« Reply #216 on: February 12, 2013, 01:09:58 AM »
I am always amazed by the number of people who register and enroll in face-to-face classes, and then don't bother to attend. Particularly when in-class participation is 10 - 30 % of the grade! I have this in two of my classes now, only on exam days does everyone show.

I did that with a history paper once. I did go to the first couple of lectures and the first tutorial. It was an Irish history paper which would have been interesting but I couldn't stand the lecturer or his teaching style. As he took the tutorials, and they weren't compulsory, I didn't go to them either. I did do all the assignments and basically taught myself from the course materials. I think I got a C in it, definitely passed I remember that. But I was really disappointed about the lecturer and didn't do the higher level Irish history paper simply because he taught it as well.

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Re: S/O PD Student Darwinism
« Reply #217 on: February 12, 2013, 06:34:50 AM »
A new one, just in this morning:

A student decided to triple dip on her use of a paper. In this case, the paper was submitted as a draft for my review.

One of the tools we use for reviewing papers is a web-based program that screens students' papers for originality. This student's draft paper returned a report of 100%, which means that it has been submitted before. I discovered that she apparently had an assignment due last night in her English course that required her to summarize a news article. The paper she wrote for my course required her to use journal articles, which she paraphrased in the paper. It seems she decided to save herself some time and effort, so she submitted this paper for the assignments in both courses.

First, she gets a SD award for submitting the paper to her other course first. Because of the originality report, I can document that the paper isn't original to my course, so she will have to rewrite it completely in order to receive any credit. Since she submitted it as a draft, I'm taking 50% off the top of her final version because she tried to double dip. She will have to rework the whole paper if she wants to receive any credit for it.

But that's not all. I discovered that she has earned an extra-special SD commendation for triple dipping. Not only did she submit the same paper to both her courses this term, but she also used the same paper she wrote when she first took my course last fall. You see, this is her second time around in my course. She failed the course with another instructor and is repeating it with me now. The instructor for her English course will clearly see from the originality report that the student recycled the paper from a previous term. This is highlighted by the fact that she left my course's title on the paper when she submitted it to her English instructor. Reusing a paper twice from a course she failed gives her the Gold Star SD designation.

In addition to her SD awards and commendations, she also earns a free pass to Student Affairs for disciplinary action.

I'm not sure how this is plagiarism if she wrote the original.  I handed in the same final paper for two classes, though I did consult with the professors in advance, and slightly rewrote the introduction and conclusion for topicality.  If the work is good I think she should be allowed to get away with this.

Where I work, submitting the same work for more than one class (or attempt at a class, in the case of retaking a class) is academic dishonesty, and is explicitly mentioned in the honesty policy. Students are expected to produce original work for each class; if previous work is used in any way, the student is expected to cite it properly; it's a very serious offense to do otherwise.

Basically, when a student turns in work for a class, they are expected to have produced the work for that class. So no, I don't think the student should be allowed to get away with this. In your case, you at least consulted with the professors and got permission in advance...since you did, I wouldn't call that dishonesty.

Yep, plagiarism at my school too.   The expectation, as Firecat says, is that students should be writing fresh papers for their classes; it doesn't matter whether the work is good or not, they should be doing the work required for that class. 

You asked permission and your professors were OK with it, which eliminates the concern about plagiarism.

Exactly. All instructors at my institution have standard language in their syllabi about this. It's an institutional policy. Students also are quizzed in most courses (it may be all courses, but I don't want to assume) about how to avoid plagiarism, and this form of plagiarism is covered in the quiz. Students learn from the quiz that they need instructor permission before trying to use their work more than once.

Sheila Take a Bow

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Re: S/O PD Student Darwinism
« Reply #218 on: February 12, 2013, 12:42:12 PM »
Back when I was in college, I was in an honors seminar for my major.  One of the components was making a presentation, based on our senior thesis topic, in front of he department faculty as well as our fellow students.

One of my classmates, Jon, did his presentation on a subject that was the specialty of Professor Bigwig.

Jon clearly had not done his research, because his presentation included a few obvious factual errors.  During the Q&A after the presentation, Professor Bigwig asked what Jon's source was for the erroneous information.

Jon couldn't name his source.  Professor Bigwig suggested that he check his notes, figure out the source, and make sure that he had the correct information before he turned in his thesis.

Jon told Professor Bigwig that he could understand why it would seem like he made some mistakes, but if Professor Bigwig understood the subject matter better he would see why Jon's facts really were correct.

Professor Bigwig proceeded to shred Jon in the Q&A session.  Jon later complained to me that his advisor's only response to him what that if he had actually researched the subject area well, he would have known who Professor Bigwig was, and known not to question his familiarity with that subject.

KenveeB

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Re: S/O PD Student Darwinism
« Reply #219 on: February 12, 2013, 02:02:28 PM »
Jon couldn't name his source.  Professor Bigwig suggested that he check his notes, figure out the source, and make sure that he had the correct information before he turned in his thesis.

Jon told Professor Bigwig that he could understand why it would seem like he made some mistakes, but if Professor Bigwig understood the subject matter better he would see why Jon's facts really were correct.

Ouch!! I had that happen to me once, where someone treated me like an idiot newbie just learning the subject when I had in fact literally written the book on it. (The only book on it, even.) Nothing makes you lose ALL credibility faster than not knowing the main experts in the field.

wolfie

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Re: S/O PD Student Darwinism
« Reply #220 on: February 12, 2013, 02:09:02 PM »
Jon couldn't name his source.  Professor Bigwig suggested that he check his notes, figure out the source, and make sure that he had the correct information before he turned in his thesis.

Jon told Professor Bigwig that he could understand why it would seem like he made some mistakes, but if Professor Bigwig understood the subject matter better he would see why Jon's facts really were correct.

Ouch!! I had that happen to me once, where someone treated me like an idiot newbie just learning the subject when I had in fact literally written the book on it. (The only book on it, even.) Nothing makes you lose ALL credibility faster than not knowing the main experts in the field.

What happened after they found out you WERE the expert?

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Re: S/O PD Student Darwinism
« Reply #221 on: February 12, 2013, 03:54:09 PM »
Oh, just found one in a 'rent a ...' site,

[Hello Everyone,

I am applying for a PhD position in International Marketing ( Title: Use of Innnovation in technology for Educational marketing) and for this I would require a Research Proposal of around 2000-2500 words. I would require all all the requisites involved in writing the proposal namely,

1) Introduction/Abstract
2) Background
3) Needs and Significance of the Study
4) Research Aims and Objectives
5) Methodology
6) Literature Review
7) How the research is useful in present scenario
8) Timeline
9) References

The writing should be original and should be able to pass the anti plagiarism softwares. The time limit is around 10-15 days. Writers with PhD degree preferred.

Thanks and Regards,
Mohammad ]


I guess it wasn't written beside the "no plagiarism" that it should be written by the prospective Phd canditate..
Just to know, is he asking for the whole 2500 words or just the structure/relevant info? Either way doesn't seems like something the university would approve..

jedikaiti

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Re: S/O PD Student Darwinism
« Reply #222 on: February 12, 2013, 04:46:45 PM »
A new one, just in this morning:

A student decided to triple dip on her use of a paper. In this case, the paper was submitted as a draft for my review.

One of the tools we use for reviewing papers is a web-based program that screens students' papers for originality. This student's draft paper returned a report of 100%, which means that it has been submitted before. I discovered that she apparently had an assignment due last night in her English course that required her to summarize a news article. The paper she wrote for my course required her to use journal articles, which she paraphrased in the paper. It seems she decided to save herself some time and effort, so she submitted this paper for the assignments in both courses.

First, she gets a SD award for submitting the paper to her other course first. Because of the originality report, I can document that the paper isn't original to my course, so she will have to rewrite it completely in order to receive any credit. Since she submitted it as a draft, I'm taking 50% off the top of her final version because she tried to double dip. She will have to rework the whole paper if she wants to receive any credit for it.

But that's not all. I discovered that she has earned an extra-special SD commendation for triple dipping. Not only did she submit the same paper to both her courses this term, but she also used the same paper she wrote when she first took my course last fall. You see, this is her second time around in my course. She failed the course with another instructor and is repeating it with me now. The instructor for her English course will clearly see from the originality report that the student recycled the paper from a previous term. This is highlighted by the fact that she left my course's title on the paper when she submitted it to her English instructor. Reusing a paper twice from a course she failed gives her the Gold Star SD designation.

In addition to her SD awards and commendations, she also earns a free pass to Student Affairs for disciplinary action.

I'm not sure how this is plagiarism if she wrote the original.  I handed in the same final paper for two classes, though I did consult with the professors in advance, and slightly rewrote the introduction and conclusion for topicality.  If the work is good I think she should be allowed to get away with this.

Where I work, submitting the same work for more than one class (or attempt at a class, in the case of retaking a class) is academic dishonesty, and is explicitly mentioned in the honesty policy. Students are expected to produce original work for each class; if previous work is used in any way, the student is expected to cite it properly; it's a very serious offense to do otherwise.

Basically, when a student turns in work for a class, they are expected to have produced the work for that class. So no, I don't think the student should be allowed to get away with this. In your case, you at least consulted with the professors and got permission in advance...since you did, I wouldn't call that dishonesty.

Dishonest or not, I have to question the wisdom of turning in THE EXACT SAME ASSIGNMENTS you did previously - when you FAILED the first time.
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KenveeB

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Re: S/O PD Student Darwinism
« Reply #223 on: February 12, 2013, 09:22:16 PM »
Jon couldn't name his source.  Professor Bigwig suggested that he check his notes, figure out the source, and make sure that he had the correct information before he turned in his thesis.

Jon told Professor Bigwig that he could understand why it would seem like he made some mistakes, but if Professor Bigwig understood the subject matter better he would see why Jon's facts really were correct.

Ouch!! I had that happen to me once, where someone treated me like an idiot newbie just learning the subject when I had in fact literally written the book on it. (The only book on it, even.) Nothing makes you lose ALL credibility faster than not knowing the main experts in the field.

What happened after they found out you WERE the expert?

Well, I usually don't say anything directly to them, just make my points and back them up. The judge already knows I know what I'm talking about, and they're the only one I have to convince. ;)

kglory

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Re: S/O PD Student Darwinism
« Reply #224 on: February 12, 2013, 10:44:01 PM »
Oh, just found one in a 'rent a ...' site,

[Hello Everyone,

I am applying for a PhD position in International Marketing ( Title: Use of Innnovation in technology for Educational marketing) and for this I would require a Research Proposal of around 2000-2500 words. I would require all all the requisites involved in writing the proposal namely,

1) Introduction/Abstract
2) Background
3) Needs and Significance of the Study
4) Research Aims and Objectives
5) Methodology
6) Literature Review
7) How the research is useful in present scenario
8) Timeline
9) References

The writing should be original and should be able to pass the anti plagiarism softwares. The time limit is around 10-15 days. Writers with PhD degree preferred.

Thanks and Regards,
Mohammad ]


I guess it wasn't written beside the "no plagiarism" that it should be written by the prospective Phd canditate..
Just to know, is he asking for the whole 2500 words or just the structure/relevant info? Either way doesn't seems like something the university would approve..

Hahaha!  I'm sorry, this one cracks me up.  He KNOWS there is a rule against plagiarism but is doing this anyway?

I'd be half tempted to answer the ad, get his full name, and then forward the whole email exchange to the dean of his university.  Ugh ugh ugh.