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Author Topic: S/O PD Student Darwinism  (Read 886583 times)

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Twik

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Re: S/O PD Student Darwinism
« Reply #375 on: April 04, 2013, 02:51:19 PM »
Students have been able to fool even vigilant proctors since the dawn of time.
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Lynnv

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Re: S/O PD Student Darwinism
« Reply #376 on: April 04, 2013, 07:04:29 PM »
Students have been able to fool even vigilant proctors since the dawn of time.

DH says that he guarantees that kids have gotten away with cheating when he has proctored exams like this.  With sometimes upwards of 30 kids (up to 50-60 when he had a larger room), he can't watch every single one of them every single second.  It doesn't mean he doesn't take it seriously. 

It just means that he hasn't developed the mutant power to be able to see everything all at once yet.  And since he doesn't like spiders, he isn't willing to get bitten by a radioactive one just to develop his Spidey-sense.   ;D
Lynn

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Garden Goblin

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Re: S/O PD Student Darwinism
« Reply #377 on: April 04, 2013, 11:04:17 PM »
publicizing the questions on at least part of the test by posting that photo on the internet.

I really don't see anything wrong with this, either.  I think more people should be aware of the content of those tests so they have a much more realistic idea of what the end results of the test taking actually means for students.

But I think my bias against standardized tests in general has a lot to do with my feelings on this event.

KenveeB

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Re: S/O PD Student Darwinism
« Reply #378 on: April 05, 2013, 01:12:00 PM »
publicizing the questions on at least part of the test by posting that photo on the internet.

I really don't see anything wrong with this, either.  I think more people should be aware of the content of those tests so they have a much more realistic idea of what the end results of the test taking actually means for students.

But I think my bias against standardized tests in general has a lot to do with my feelings on this event.

Being more aware of the content of tests before you take them is also known as "cheating" when it involves actual (and unapproved) pictures of the test!

jedikaiti

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Re: S/O PD Student Darwinism
« Reply #379 on: April 05, 2013, 01:15:04 PM »
Also, if he could post a pic, he could be looking up answers, too.

Yea - there's a big difference between, say, pulling a bunch of questions from the test DB and generating a sample test (or more than one) for public perusal and comment, and posting the questions to an actual test online while it is in use. One is inviting public comment and review, the other is cheating.
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Slartibartfast

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Re: S/O PD Student Darwinism
« Reply #380 on: April 05, 2013, 02:06:04 PM »
Was this "picture of a filled-out answer sheet" or "picture of test questions" or "picture of an otherwise blank answer booklet?"  Because that would definitely affect whether I thought this was "cheating" or not.  (It's definitely breaking the rules, if no cameras/phones were allowed, but IMHO breaking the rules and cheating on the test are two overlapping but not identical sets.)

ladyknight1

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Re: S/O PD Student Darwinism
« Reply #381 on: April 05, 2013, 02:11:18 PM »
This is a big deal.

At my university and my son's high school, just taking pictures of the blank test booklet are grounds for an academic dishonesty case. If this student ends up getting in trouble for it, it will have to be reported on any college application. I see this kind of thing all the time, and the students with a history of academic misconduct have to go through a committee process to be admitted to the university.
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Garden Goblin

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Re: S/O PD Student Darwinism
« Reply #382 on: April 05, 2013, 02:36:51 PM »
Was this "picture of a filled-out answer sheet" or "picture of test questions" or "picture of an otherwise blank answer booklet?"  Because that would definitely affect whether I thought this was "cheating" or not.  (It's definitely breaking the rules, if no cameras/phones were allowed, but IMHO breaking the rules and cheating on the test are two overlapping but not identical sets.)

I've seen the pic.  Anyone who could manage to cheat off that pic deserves the A.

AngelicGamer

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Re: S/O PD Student Darwinism
« Reply #383 on: April 05, 2013, 03:04:41 PM »
Was this "picture of a filled-out answer sheet" or "picture of test questions" or "picture of an otherwise blank answer booklet?"  Because that would definitely affect whether I thought this was "cheating" or not.  (It's definitely breaking the rules, if no cameras/phones were allowed, but IMHO breaking the rules and cheating on the test are two overlapping but not identical sets.)

I've seen the pic.  Anyone who could manage to cheat off that pic deserves the A.

I agree! 

This link explains the story and shows the pic the student took: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/04/02/kyron-birdine-student-tweets-yolo-suspended_n_3000138.html



VorFemme

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Re: S/O PD Student Darwinism
« Reply #384 on: April 05, 2013, 04:26:27 PM »
Okay - no questions were compromised in the photo that he tweeted.

But there is the question of "why did you have to show off that you broke the rules by bringing your internet capable camera equipped cell phone in there with you and USING it?"  Because simple logic says that you can protest LATER, using that same piece of equipment outside the testing environment and not have any splash back on breaking the rules impacting the rest of your life.  Which, as has been pointed out in that twitter post - you only get one life.  And being a thoughtless twit who twittered at the wrong time from the wrong place (a place not intended to have cell phones in it) about something controversial - will have an impact on that one life.

Now, it may be that the name will live on in the law books as part of a precedent setting legal ruling.....or it may be that the name will live on in a rather less imposing way, as verbal shorthand for someone exposing that they did something that they weren't supposed to do at all, at the wrong time, in the wrong place, and then sent photo evidence out intentionally...... 
Let sleeping dragons be.......morning breath......need I explain?

JustEstelle

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Re: S/O PD Student Darwinism
« Reply #385 on: April 06, 2013, 02:05:48 AM »
I gather from the information given that this particular test was in Texas.  I'm familiar with Texas law regarding this (having taught in public schools here for many years). 

It wouldn't matter if he tweeted the picture from the testing room or waited until he got home to do so; taking a picture of the testing materials in any shape, form, or fashion violated Texas laws regarding the testing and invalidated his test results.  In other words, he would have automatically failed.  The teacher proctoring the exam (and Texas law mandates that the proctors be licensed teachers) likely got sanctioned by the Texas Education Agency which could have included having his/her teaching certificate pulled for the kid having a cell phone in his possession during testing.  The state of Texas does not play about these matters.

Jocelyn

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Re: S/O PD Student Darwinism
« Reply #386 on: April 06, 2013, 10:32:53 AM »
After having had the 'academic suspension' talk with an advisee earlier this week (explaining the bitter truth that no, you cannot keep flunking your classes and continue as a student in this department or at this university) and identifying the steps he needed to take to avoid that unpleasant consequence, which included preparing himself for the exam I was giving Friday morning:

I looked at his corner of the room to see him flip his notebook with his thumb. As if subtly opening it to access answers. I then noticed that his cell phone was in plain sight, too.
About 2 minutes later he noticed that my eye was directly fixed on him, and it stayed there for the rest of the hour. I have never seen a student squirm so much during an exam. I don't know if it was because he realized I'd observed him (and that he'd just lost an ally he'd desperately need to be retained in the program) or because he'd realized how poorly he'd prepared to pass the exam without outside assistance, but he was the last student to turn in his exam.
And then I went back to grade the paper he'd turned in earlier...and found it was not the correct paper, but a paper he'd prepared for a colleague. I'd write it off as simple error, except that this is a common enough cheating technique: if you haven't completed the paper, turn in any old thing, and continue to work on the paper until the professor notifies you you turned in the wrong thing.

blue2000

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Re: S/O PD Student Darwinism
« Reply #387 on: April 06, 2013, 12:07:19 PM »
After having had the 'academic suspension' talk with an advisee earlier this week (explaining the bitter truth that no, you cannot keep flunking your classes and continue as a student in this department or at this university) and identifying the steps he needed to take to avoid that unpleasant consequence, which included preparing himself for the exam I was giving Friday morning:

I looked at his corner of the room to see him flip his notebook with his thumb. As if subtly opening it to access answers. I then noticed that his cell phone was in plain sight, too.
About 2 minutes later he noticed that my eye was directly fixed on him, and it stayed there for the rest of the hour. I have never seen a student squirm so much during an exam. I don't know if it was because he realized I'd observed him (and that he'd just lost an ally he'd desperately need to be retained in the program) or because he'd realized how poorly he'd prepared to pass the exam without outside assistance, but he was the last student to turn in his exam.
And then I went back to grade the paper he'd turned in earlier...and found it was not the correct paper, but a paper he'd prepared for a colleague. I'd write it off as simple error, except that this is a common enough cheating technique: if you haven't completed the paper, turn in any old thing, and continue to work on the paper until the professor notifies you you turned in the wrong thing.

Why did I never think of these things?!?

Oh, right. Because it was easier to just write the paper without cheating. :P
You are only young once. After that you have to think up some other excuse.

Jocelyn

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Re: S/O PD Student Darwinism
« Reply #388 on: April 06, 2013, 01:05:01 PM »
After having had the 'academic suspension' talk with an advisee earlier this week (explaining the bitter truth that no, you cannot keep flunking your classes and continue as a student in this department or at this university) and identifying the steps he needed to take to avoid that unpleasant consequence, which included preparing himself for the exam I was giving Friday morning:

I looked at his corner of the room to see him flip his notebook with his thumb. As if subtly opening it to access answers. I then noticed that his cell phone was in plain sight, too.
About 2 minutes later he noticed that my eye was directly fixed on him, and it stayed there for the rest of the hour. I have never seen a student squirm so much during an exam. I don't know if it was because he realized I'd observed him (and that he'd just lost an ally he'd desperately need to be retained in the program) or because he'd realized how poorly he'd prepared to pass the exam without outside assistance, but he was the last student to turn in his exam.
And then I went back to grade the paper he'd turned in earlier...and found it was not the correct paper, but a paper he'd prepared for a colleague. I'd write it off as simple error, except that this is a common enough cheating technique: if you haven't completed the paper, turn in any old thing, and continue to work on the paper until the professor notifies you you turned in the wrong thing.

Why did I never think of these things?!?

Oh, right. Because it was easier to just write the paper without cheating. :P
A related technique is to submit a jpeg file as a docx document. It automatically comes in 'corrupted', so that the professor believes you suffered a misfortune in the uploading.
Unless the professor knows to try to open the document in a program that will open jpeg files.  >:D

Sirius

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Re: S/O PD Student Darwinism
« Reply #389 on: April 06, 2013, 01:52:03 PM »
Med Student Darwinism:  Don't talk about other patients in front of other patients, and don't leave your clipboard full of notes about private patient data on the meal tray of a random patient.  These aren't good things to do when patient privacy is important.

These are huge no-nos even if you aren't a student.  I worked at a teaching hospital, and residents would often get on the elevator with me and be talking about patients.  I guess they figured that since I was wearing an employee badge it was safe to talk in front of me.  They shouldn't have been, though, because I wasn't involved in the patient's care.