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Author Topic: S/O PD Student Darwinism  (Read 886830 times)

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cwm

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Re: S/O PD Student Darwinism
« Reply #750 on: October 24, 2013, 01:27:45 PM »
One of my teachers had open-book open-note finals. The final was comprehensive for the entire year, and she had learned that the people who had studied knew exactly where to look for the exact answers they needed while the people who hadn't were flailing.

I had a college proessor who let us take notes into our tests. But this was a listening exam for music. We had a list of all the pieces in her "library" for the test and could make any notes we wanted except musical notation. Then she'd play them and we'd have to know which piece and composer it was. I look back on my notes for that course and laugh. "Spiky in the middle, with some angry blue notes, but every few measures it pauses to take a breath before starting up the rant again."

purplerainbow

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Re: S/O PD Student Darwinism
« Reply #751 on: October 24, 2013, 04:42:34 PM »
I invigilate (proctor?) exams in a high school. Unfortunately, the students really don't help themselves. Few, if any, even bring a PEN into the exam. The school has to provide pencil cases because otherwise the majority of students wouldn't have anything to write with.  :o  Then they try to steal the pens/graffiti the desk or pencil case.
In terms of trying to communicate with each other, it's got to the point where I'm actually grateful if they put their head down and go to sleep once they've finished, because it means they're not looking around at their friends.


On another note, a number of kids who come into the library after school (where and when I'm on duty), seem to think I'm deaf or don't care. Now, the truth is actually that at the librarian's desk, I have access to a program on my computer, that shows me what is happening on their computers. Not only does it show me, but I have various actions at my disposal. I can remotely control a computer (on the few occasions I've done it, it was only to log off students who had already left); I can take screen shots; I can make their screen go blank; I can write messages to them to let them know they're being watched; I can block their internet access; I can even log them out and shut down their computer. (Hypothetically. I've not shut anyone down yet.)
Most of the kids trying to access games or other blocked websites (we allow certain games, on specific educational sites), talk to each other about it, or tell each other how to try and get to said blocked site.  :P Even if they don't I can see what they're doing. So, if they've spent more than a few minutes Googling games, or youtube converters, etc, I block their internet without warning. I shouldn't need to "warn" them, to be honest; in order to log onto a computer, you need to click "I agree" to the school's computer usage policy, which states that you should be using them for school work/research/learning.
Anyway, internet blockage invariably results in cries of, "Miss, the internet's not working, and I need the internet to do my homework!" Some of them ask why it was blocked.
My reply is always similar - the internet doesn't get blocked for no reason, so it must be something they've done. If they had truly been doing homework, it wouldn't be blocked.
I don't tell them it was me who disabled their internet access. Why should I? The fact is, they were using school facilities in a way they know is not allowed. I'm not going to block them for every google search - if they're obviously researching something,  and making a powerpoint/writing an essay or something, fine. But I know the teachers in the school, and I know for a fact they haven't set homework on "Ronaldo's hairstyle", "GTA", "weird games" or "funny American Football moments".
I find it quite ridiculous, and sometimes amusing, how many of them think that I don't hear what they're saying, in an otherwise quiet library.  :P If they're telling their friend how to get to that game site, I'm going to make a note to check what they're doing. Duh!

rigs32

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Re: S/O PD Student Darwinism
« Reply #752 on: October 24, 2013, 05:02:42 PM »
I could not tolerate no bathroom breaks for a lengthy exam and would make sure I was able to go as needed.  I refuse to dehydrate myself for the sake of convenience.  My skin gets dry and itchy to the point of bleeding in the winter if I don't drink enough water.  Drinking enough water requires regular bathroom breaks.

When I took the bar exam, I used the bathroom once during each morning and afternoon session.  I was able to finish and exit the room before the mandatory lock down period - can't remember if it was 15 or 30 min - but I jogged to the bathroom each time just in case I needed that extra minute or two in the end.

---------

As for SD, I used to teach at a local college.  The worst SD ever was the paper I received that had large chunks of the college's website cut and pasted into the document.  Not only that, but the words "click here for further information" were still in place, too.

LazyDaisy

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Re: S/O PD Student Darwinism
« Reply #753 on: October 24, 2013, 05:22:31 PM »
One of my teachers had open-book open-note finals. The final was comprehensive for the entire year, and she had learned that the people who had studied knew exactly where to look for the exact answers they needed while the people who hadn't were flailing.

I had a college proessor who let us take notes into our tests. But this was a listening exam for music. We had a list of all the pieces in her "library" for the test and could make any notes we wanted except musical notation. Then she'd play them and we'd have to know which piece and composer it was. I look back on my notes for that course and laugh. "Spiky in the middle, with some angry blue notes, but every few measures it pauses to take a breath before starting up the rant again."
Ok now I'm just going to obsess about this...Rimsky-Korsakov "Flight of the Bumblebee", Gioachino Rossini "William Tell Overture"...what is it?!?!?!?
"A common mistake that people make when trying to design something completely foolproof is to underestimate the ingenuity of complete fools." Douglas Adams

Katana_Geldar

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Re: S/O PD Student Darwinism
« Reply #754 on: October 24, 2013, 08:01:57 PM »
When one student was last in a line of five people to use the bathroom, he complained when I suggested he go before the exam. Is it asking much of the average person to wait to go to the toilet for three hours?

I've lost sympathy for them when obebofvthe students said he needed to go abd he was one of the ones with a phone.

mbbored

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Re: S/O PD Student Darwinism
« Reply #755 on: October 24, 2013, 08:25:58 PM »
When one student was last in a line of five people to use the bathroom, he complained when I suggested he go before the exam. Is it asking much of the average person to wait to go to the toilet for three hours?

I've lost sympathy for them when obebofvthe students said he needed to go abd he was one of the ones with a phone.

It's too much to ask of me.

Psychopoesie

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Re: S/O PD Student Darwinism
« Reply #756 on: October 24, 2013, 08:28:01 PM »
When one student was last in a line of five people to use the bathroom, he complained when I suggested he go before the exam. Is it asking much of the average person to wait to go to the toilet for three hours?

I've lost sympathy for them when obebofvthe students said he needed to go abd he was one of the ones with a phone.

Yes, it is asking too much. Even if a person would usually be fine for that length of time, sometimes exam nerves and all the pre-exam caffeine aren't helpful in this regard. Perhaps the person has her period. Or this might just be how that individual's body normally works. Even if they went to the loo beforehand.

I would find it really offensive if an invigilator commented about my needing a toilet break. It is really none of their business why I need to go. I think the last time someone asked me why I didn't go before some major event (usually a car trip) it was my mother and I was probably eight.

Realise it is frustrating to catch out so many cheaters but at least some who put their hand up to request a bathroom break are going to be genuine. Surely it's possible to treat the students respectfully while still being vigilant about cheating?


Katana_Geldar

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Re: S/O PD Student Darwinism
« Reply #757 on: October 24, 2013, 08:44:48 PM »
I do try to, but it is a bit much when students ask to use the toilet 5 minutes after they get their paper.

It looks like our vigilance has paid off though. In our room (biggest one) we didn't have a single case of cheating or talking. Though I had one student writing after the end, I even saw him pick up his pen after putting it down to write.

Last exam and then I get to go home.

MommyPenguin

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Re: S/O PD Student Darwinism
« Reply #758 on: October 24, 2013, 09:34:01 PM »
Three hours would be way too much for me during the daytime.  Even a 2-hour movie is sometimes too much.  I drink a lot, I have a small bladder, and I have trouble ignoring a need to go.  It would *really* distract me if I had to go and wasn't allowed to.   I sort of agree about needing to go 5 minutes before the test starts, except that it might really be nerves, or maybe they were afraid to go right before the test started and miss getting into the test classroom, etc.  It does sound like cheating is rampant in that school, though, so I can see taking extra precautions.  And I agree about international students/recent immigres, that the culture back home is often different in terms of what is considered cheating, plagiarism, etc., and sometimes there's an adjustment period before they figure out what is expected in the new country.

It makes sense to me to not allow students to leave in the last 15 minutes, because students who need most of the time allocated will often be hurrying to finish, possibly going back to problems they skipped before (and thus working on the very problems that are giving them the most trouble), etc., and it's definitely distracting to have other people leaving around you.  Not just the noise and commotion, but also the feeling that everybody else is already finished, you're obviously taking too long, etc.
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RoseRose

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Re: S/O PD Student Darwinism
« Reply #759 on: October 24, 2013, 09:54:44 PM »
I had an astrophysics professor who would allow an 8.5"x11" sheet of paper, and gave awards after each exam for things like "most organized" and "most colorful"

I had a high school physics teacher who allowed one sheet of paper.  It does have to be one sheet, but he doesn't restrict the size.  One year, apparently two students brought in whole scrolls.  They got two of the worst grades in the class because they didn't know enough to know what on their sheets they needed to look for to solve the problems.

I used mine for the formulas, and a quick note about them, since I'm awful about remembering formulas.



cwm

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Re: S/O PD Student Darwinism
« Reply #760 on: October 25, 2013, 10:08:23 AM »
One of my teachers had open-book open-note finals. The final was comprehensive for the entire year, and she had learned that the people who had studied knew exactly where to look for the exact answers they needed while the people who hadn't were flailing.

I had a college proessor who let us take notes into our tests. But this was a listening exam for music. We had a list of all the pieces in her "library" for the test and could make any notes we wanted except musical notation. Then she'd play them and we'd have to know which piece and composer it was. I look back on my notes for that course and laugh. "Spiky in the middle, with some angry blue notes, but every few measures it pauses to take a breath before starting up the rant again."
Ok now I'm just going to obsess about this...Rimsky-Korsakov "Flight of the Bumblebee", Gioachino Rossini "William Tell Overture"...what is it?!?!?!?

I honestly can't remember which piece it was, but it was a 20th century piece about the bombing of Nagasaki. The middle that was spiky was an airborne firefight, apparently.

Twik

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Re: S/O PD Student Darwinism
« Reply #761 on: October 25, 2013, 10:19:53 AM »
One of my teachers had open-book open-note finals. The final was comprehensive for the entire year, and she had learned that the people who had studied knew exactly where to look for the exact answers they needed while the people who hadn't were flailing.

I had a college proessor who let us take notes into our tests. But this was a listening exam for music. We had a list of all the pieces in her "library" for the test and could make any notes we wanted except musical notation. Then she'd play them and we'd have to know which piece and composer it was. I look back on my notes for that course and laugh. "Spiky in the middle, with some angry blue notes, but every few measures it pauses to take a breath before starting up the rant again."
Ok now I'm just going to obsess about this...Rimsky-Korsakov "Flight of the Bumblebee", Gioachino Rossini "William Tell Overture"...what is it?!?!?!?

I honestly can't remember which piece it was, but it was a 20th century piece about the bombing of Nagasaki. The middle that was spiky was an airborne firefight, apparently.

Threnody to the Victims of Hiroshima?

(Sorry, I used Wikipedia.)
"The sky's the limit. Your sky. Your limit. Now, let's dance!"

cwm

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Re: S/O PD Student Darwinism
« Reply #762 on: October 25, 2013, 10:23:45 AM »
One of my teachers had open-book open-note finals. The final was comprehensive for the entire year, and she had learned that the people who had studied knew exactly where to look for the exact answers they needed while the people who hadn't were flailing.

I had a college proessor who let us take notes into our tests. But this was a listening exam for music. We had a list of all the pieces in her "library" for the test and could make any notes we wanted except musical notation. Then she'd play them and we'd have to know which piece and composer it was. I look back on my notes for that course and laugh. "Spiky in the middle, with some angry blue notes, but every few measures it pauses to take a breath before starting up the rant again."
Ok now I'm just going to obsess about this...Rimsky-Korsakov "Flight of the Bumblebee", Gioachino Rossini "William Tell Overture"...what is it?!?!?!?

I honestly can't remember which piece it was, but it was a 20th century piece about the bombing of Nagasaki. The middle that was spiky was an airborne firefight, apparently.

Threnody to the Victims of Hiroshima?

(Sorry, I used Wikipedia.)

That's it exactly.

I'd have looked it up, but my mind has flown the coop entirely today.

Twik

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Re: S/O PD Student Darwinism
« Reply #763 on: October 25, 2013, 10:44:33 AM »
Actually, that is a brilliant description of music. I love the bit about "taking a breath before starting the rant again."
"The sky's the limit. Your sky. Your limit. Now, let's dance!"

Wordgeek

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Re: S/O PD Student Darwinism
« Reply #764 on: October 25, 2013, 11:50:05 AM »
Regarding bathroom breaks during exams:  It is common at many institutions to forbid breaks of any kind during an exam.  In some cases, breaks are allowed but only under escort. 

Those who require breaks for medical reasons must make arrangements through the centre for students with disabilities.  The student has a confidential meeting at the CSD, discusses his or her specific needs, provides the appropriate documentation, and then the CSD officer makes decisions around the necessary accommodations.  The student then notifies the professor of the accommodations.  If it's a matter of the student needing more frequent toilet breaks, s/he would probably write the exam separately from the other students but still under supervision.

The point is, university is for grown-ups, and grown-ups take responsibility for themselves.  If a student enrols in a class with a three-hour final, then the student needs to write that exam or fail the class.  A student who requires special accommodation for exams due to a disability or medical condition *is still responsible* for making the necessary arrangements.  Someone who is suffering due to poor planning gets to suffer.  That's called consequences. 

For the record, I'm writing this as a university instructor who's just filed a set of final grades.  Two students flunked out due to not doing the assigned homework.  As a result, they lost the points they would have gotten from those assignments and also did not build up the knowledge base or acquire the skills they needed to do well in their final.  Same thing: They suffered for their poor planning.  Cause, meet effect.

Better to light a candle than curse the darkness.