Hostesses With The Mostest > Entertaining and Hospitality

Hosting horror stories

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magician5:

--- Quote from: mom22militarymen on February 16, 2013, 08:27:09 AM ---Cheyne, I liked your story and it brought back a memory from me from 30 years ago. When in college I taught myself to make bread. I spent a whole day making French croissants. It was a long process but I was proud of my efforts when I got these flaky beautiful croissants out of the oven.
My Future FIL and my dad both loved when I baked. I took some to my FIL and he met me in the driveway with a stick of Promise Margarine in hand and took me in the house, where he consumed the croissants, with that horrible fake butter ;), in just minutes. He wasn't supposed to have butter, but he piled globs of Promise on everything.
When I got home, my dad was raving about his croissants. He had enjoyed him with his bowl of canned soup!
I guess I had a vision of them eating them slowly with a nice cup of coffee. I felt my all day efforts weren't really appreciated. But two of my favorite men enjoyed them the way they wanted to, and that was really all that mattered.

--- End quote ---

But how did they go with catsup?

cheyne:

--- Quote from: magician5 on February 16, 2013, 04:18:43 PM ---
--- Quote from: mom22militarymen on February 16, 2013, 08:27:09 AM ---Cheyne, I liked your story and it brought back a memory from me from 30 years ago. When in college I taught myself to make bread. I spent a whole day making French croissants. It was a long process but I was proud of my efforts when I got these flaky beautiful croissants out of the oven.
My Future FIL and my dad both loved when I baked. I took some to my FIL and he met me in the driveway with a stick of Promise Margarine in hand and took me in the house, where he consumed the croissants, with that horrible fake butter ;), in just minutes. He wasn't supposed to have butter, but he piled globs of Promise on everything.
When I got home, my dad was raving about his croissants. He had enjoyed him with his bowl of canned soup!
I guess I had a vision of them eating them slowly with a nice cup of coffee. I felt my all day efforts weren't really appreciated. But two of my favorite men enjoyed them the way they wanted to, and that was really all that mattered.

--- End quote ---

But how did they go with catsup?

--- End quote ---

You are wicked!  >:D


jedikaiti:

--- Quote from: Hmmmmm on February 14, 2013, 10:49:37 AM ---I do understand modifying what you cook based on who is attending.  I have a BIL who really doesn't care much about what he is eating. To him, the paella I spent 3 hours preparing tastes the same as my 30 minute jambalaya recipe.

But I do have a question.  Is it a breach of etiquette to substantially modify a meal served by your hostess?  I'm not talking about a sprinkle of a little salt or pepper or adding a bit more tabasco to your bowl of gumbo.  But more like the OP stated. Dan requested a bottle of ketchup be provided and then doused his meal with the ketchup.  Is that a breach of etiquette for an adult diner? 

The OP's story reminded me of an event from my college days. I had 3 roommates and one decided to make Fettucinni Alfredo and invite over all of our BF's. She served it, bread, and salad. One roommate's BF was suprised there was no meat so his GF went and got a can of tuna to top their servings. The cook roommate was very irritated and I was completely suprised because in my background that would never have been acceptable.  Tuna roommate felt because she lived there she was within her right even though she contributed nothing in labor or cost to the meal.

--- End quote ---

I would suggest NOT doing something so smelly as tuna, though - something with that strong an odor can easily put everyone else off their meal.

Miss Misha:

--- Quote from: Roe on February 15, 2013, 08:02:49 AM ---Cheyne, that's hilarious!  English sauce!  LOL!   ;D

BTW, I would love your mole recipe if you wouldn't mind sharing.  For a shortcut, I use Dona Maria and add a few spices to it and I'm always curious to see how others make it. It's one of my favorite things to make.  The Native American Museum in DC has really good mole tacos...my middleson is begging to go back this weekend 'cause he's craving them. 

I used to live in STexas where getting tamales was no problem whatsoever!  Now that we are in DC area, I make tamales from scratch but they aren't coming out that great.  Definitely not my grandma's tamales!  They are "okay" but I'm still searching for a better recipe.  I can't ask my grandma because she buys the 'wet' masa while I can only find the dry variety around here so I'm using different recipes I find online.  So again, if you wouldn't mind sharing, I'd love to see how you make your tamales.  :)

--- End quote ---

Best mole EVAR!  I tried to link to the original page, but got a 404 error:

Basic Mole Paste from Jacqueline Higuera McMahan

10 dried ancho chiles
6 dried pasilla negro chiles
4 dried guajillo or mulato chiles
6 tbl black raisins
1/2 cup almonds
6 tbl raw sesame seeds
1/4 cup raw pumpkins seeds (sometimes called pepitas)
1 slice french bread
1 corn tortilla
1 3" piece cinnamon bark or 1 1/2 tea. ground cinnamon
6 whole cloves
1 tea peppercorns
1 1/2 tea oregano (Mexican preferred)
1 round of Ibarra Mexican Chocolate (3.1 oz.), broken into pieces

Wash the dried chiles under cold running water.  Pull out the stems, then shake out the seeds.  Heat a griddle or nonstick skillet and gently toast the chiles.  Do not overbrown or they will be bitter.

After toasting, put all chilis in a huge bowl and cover with boiling water.  Add raisins to plump. Let steep 30 minutes. 

Meanwhile, preheat oven to 350 degrees and place the almonds, sesame seeds and pumpkins seeds in separate pans for toasting (I use separate pieces of foil on a large cookie sheet).  Toast in oven for ~10 minutes.  Remove separately as they brown (usually the sesame seeds first).  Also toast the bread and tortilla in same oven.

Grind spices (I have a dedicated coffee grinder for this).

Drain chiles and raisins, reserving soaking water.  Chop chilis, almonds and seeds in food processor.  Add raisins, ground spices, tortilla, bread, oregano and chocolate and chop/combine.  Add enough soaking water to make a thick paste. 

This paste freezes well and is the base for mole sauce (1 recipe paste=2 batches sauce), below.

Mole Sauce
3 large tomatoes, chopped or 3 cups drained canned tomatoes
1/2 onion
4 cloves garlic
2 tea olive oil
2 cups Mole Paste
1 to 2 cups chicken or vegetable broth

Preheat oven to 375 degrees.  Place tomatoes in small, foil-lined roasting pan (easier clean up and handling later).  Roast in oven 20 minutes.  Let cool slightly.  Put onion and garlic in square of foil.  Drizzle with olive oil and fold foil to cover.  Roast alongside tomatoes in oven for 45 minutes.

Pick up edges of foil holding tomatoes and use as a funnel to pour into food processor.  Add roasted vegetables.  Chop roughly.   Add mole paste and broth until of desired consistency; i.e., more broth for enchilada sauce, less for tamales.  I also grill chicken and pour a thick-ish version of the sauce on top with a squeeze of lime. 

Gotta go, drooling on keyboard now.

Miss Misha:
Oh, and now my horror story.   ;)

I invited the Managing Partner, my boss (Consulting Principal and next in line to the top), and fellow consultant and their spouses to my first.big.dinner.party at my.first.big.newly.purchased house.  Fellow consultant's babysitting arrangements fell through, so he brought his five year old and 18 month old.  To a house with light grey carpets, a large dog and my wedding china and crystal laid on the table.  The dog and the tableware survived intact.  The carpet did not.  Red wine anyone?  Oh, and the childrens' mom?  Didn't even offer to help clean up.  Just kept saying how the kids "weren't used to this kind of party".  Well, uh, yeah.  Because they aren't adults yet and this was intended as an *adult* party.  /end snark

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