A Civil World. Off-topic discussions on a variety of topics. > Time For a Coffee Break!

University Related - Is this reasonable to ask?

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Roodabega:
<bg>Our child picked and went to a university that was a long way from home.  The first year they did well, making it on the Dean's list.  However the second year, they started having issues with sleeping and depression.  They ended up missing a lot of class time (unknown to us at the time) and failed or received an incomplete for all of their classes.  We took them to a professional, who gave them antidepressants and sleep aids, but when they went back for the next semester, they experienced the same issue so we did a withdrawal from the university.

The child in question has had regular visits to a professional, and is now attending a university that they can commute to from home.
</bg>

For any education professionals out there, would it be reasonable for us to talk to the first university and see if some accommodation can be made regarding grades for the "bad" semester?  No matter how well our child does with the rest of their degree, that one semester is going to be a major drag on their final GPA.

gramma dishes:
Many colleges and universities will 'drop' such negative information off their transcript.  It would be as though your child never took those classes. 

In addition, if your student is retaking those exact classes, some colleges will simply replace the old grade (from college #1) with the newer grade for that same class at college #2.

I'd wait and see how this particular student does at the new college close to home.  If his/her grades improve substantially, I'd inquire at the "new" college first and get their suggestions as to how to handle it. 

Roodabega:
Also, to go along with the first question, does anyone have ideas on how my child might respond to a potential employer in the future with regards to the education gap?  Or if we can't get that semester modified, how would they explain the dismal showing for that semester?

Sebastienne:
The last school I taught at did have a form of retroactive withdrawal, used only in very, very, very special circumstances--circumstances so special that our Dean, who had been there for over a decade, had never seen it used. So it's something that may exist, and it may not hurt to ask, but you should ask expecting the answer to be no.

As for employers, there's probably no need to explain; most employers I've encountered don't ask for transcripts. Proof of a degree, maybe, or GPA, but no transcripts. And his "old school" GPA shouldn't play into his "new school" GPA if credits are transferred over.

LadyL:

--- Quote from: Sebastienne on February 07, 2013, 03:22:46 PM ---
As for employers, there's probably no need to explain; most employers I've encountered don't ask for transcripts. Proof of a degree, maybe, or GPA, but no transcripts. And his "old school" GPA shouldn't play into his "new school" GPA if credits are transferred over.

--- End quote ---

POD. In my experience, employers and even grad school don't care about GPA as much as you'd think. I'm sure there are people who have great academic records but no actual job skills and vice versa. It's not a kiss of death to have some low grades. If it were ever to come up for any reason, I think it's acceptable to say "I was having a medical issue at that time that affected my performance. The issue has been completely resolved and I feel my current work speaks to the standards I hold for myself."

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